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Succession Planning and Change: Growing and Developing Talent in Public Health

Course Objective

  • Define “succession planning” for public health agencies
  • Explain the rationale for succession planning in public health
  • Identify the key elements of the succession planning process
  • Describe the link between change management and organizational succession planning
  • Explain the critical success factors for succession planning in public health

Date: November 10, 2020

Presenter:
Emil J. Sadloch, MA
SADLOCH DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANTS


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Emil J. Sadloch, MA, highlights the importance of succession planning and why it is so relevant for public health today. While acknowledging the incredible contributions of public health officials during this pandemic, he underscores the aspects of leadership, change management and workforce resilience that enabled this. He goes on to discuss the necessary shift in focus needed to address the future of public health and how leaders can recover and adapt from times of crisis. Emil elaborates ways to strengthen the current workforce in preparation for new challenges, while simultaneously grooming the next generation for the same. He walks us through 10 important goals of succession planning and what the existing barriers look like. Lastly, he shows us how to create an effective succession planning system by walking us through crucial practices and providing us with important tips to develop future leaders.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define “succession planning” for public health agencies
  2. Explain the rationale for succession planning in public health
  3. Identify the key elements of the succession planning process
  4. Describe the link between change management and organizational succession planning
  5. Explain the critical success factors for succession planning in public health
Strategic Storytelling for Public Health

Course Objective

  • Describe the value and power of using stories to engage audiences in a strategic manner
  • Identify six different types of stories to use when engaging audiences
  • Explain techniques for creating powerful stories, including both the process of telling stories and the content

Date: October 6th 2020

Presenter:
Mark Dessauer, MA
Vice President of Learning
Spitfire Strategies


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Mark Dessauer, MA, discusses the power of storytelling and how to optimize it. He emphasizes the importance of using stories as a public health tool to engage diverse audiences. He talks about the impact stories can have on changing existing narratives and addressing cultural norms. During this time of uncertainty, Mark stresses the need to use stories to connect people by sharing emotions and experiences that reflect their communities. He reiterates the use of this strategy to shed light on untold stories and to encourage equitable visibility. He also makes use of a variety of examples to demonstrate the effective use of this strategy to influence changes in attitudes and behaviors. Lastly, Mark walks us through the “storyteller’s toolbox”, providing insights on the types of stories to share, what angles to take and how to best showcase them.

Participants will learn how to the following:

  1. Describe the value and power of using stories to engage audiences in a strategic manner
  2. Identify six different types of stories to use when engaging audiences
  3. Explain techniques for creating powerful stories, including both the process of telling stories and the content
A public health perspective on dismantling systemic racism: What role for health departments?

Course Objective

  • Explain why state and local health departments have the opportunity, mandate, capacity and imperative to take action to dismantle elements of systemic racism that harm health
  • Give examples of specific actions health departments can take to interrupt pathways by which racially disparate access to healthy food, criminal justice policies, and educational policies contribute to the health burdens of Black, Latinx, indigenous, and other populations of color.
  • Identify one or more ways that they can take action now within their institution to strengthen its actions designed to dismantle systemic racism

Date: September 1, 2020

Presenters
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH

Erinn Bacchus, MPH

Craig Willingham, MPH

City University of New York Urban Food Policy Institute


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, participants learn about three distinct approaches to address the intersections between public health and systemic racism in the United States. Dr. Nicholas Freudenburg, DrPH, MPH, discusses the relationship between the key determinants of health and racism and the need to end the inequitable provisions of education, housing and healthcare by creating communities of opportunity. Errin Bachhus, MPH, addresses racism in the criminal justice system and the role of public health organizations. In light of recent incidents of police brutality, she highlights the need to reevaluate the role of police departments and the best ways for health departments to intervene through programs and policy. Craig Willingham, MPH, examines how food policy can be crucial in increasing racial equity. He reviews the Good Food Purchasing Program and other city-wide efforts and shares how they can be targeted at minority groups to help alleviate inequities. Lastly, the speakers suggest a to-do list for public health organizations to actively make changes to current structures, provide creative examples to inspire action and recommend books to further broaden perspectives.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain why state and local health departments have the opportunity, mandate, capacity and imperative to take action to dismantle elements of systemic racism that harm health
  2. Give examples of specific actions health departments can take to interrupt pathways by which racially disparate access to healthy food, criminal justice policies, and educational policies contribute to the health burdens of Black, Latinx, indigenous, and other populations of color.
  3. Identify one or more ways that they can take action now within their institution to strengthen its actions designed to dismantle systemic racism.
Buprenorphine Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Course Objective

  • Explain regulatory updates regarding buprenorphine treatment during a public health emergency
  • Describe practice-level changes in buprenorphine treatment throughout COVID-19
  • Discuss common issues affecting patients in buprenorphine treatment during COVID-19

Date: July 7th, 2020

Presenter:
Tiffany Lu, MD, MS
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Montefiore Medical Center / Albert Einstein School of Medicine


In this month’s Log-in2Learn Dr. Tiffany Lu provides an overview of buprenorphine treatment prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and the challenges associated with treatment for opioid use disorder during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Lu describes the communities hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic and how the pandemic paved the way for regulation updates regarding buprenorphine treatment such as reduced restrictions and an increased use of telemedicine to treat opioid use disorders. The webinar also addresses some other measures put in place with buprenorphine treatment due to the public health emergency, including: longer prescriptions, halted urine drug testing (self reports), access to naloxone and harm reduction supplies. The presenter also shares available resources to support clinical providers as they face the challenges associated with buprenorphine treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain regulatory updates regarding buprenorphine treatment during a public health emergency
  2. Describe practice-level changes in buprenorphine treatment throughout COVID-19
  3. Discuss common issues affecting patients in buprenorphine treatment during COVID-19
Reducing Obesity and Diet-Related Diseases by Limiting Predatory Marketing of Unhealthy Food

Course Objective

Learning Objectives for Part I: Understanding Predatory Marketing

  • Define targeted and predatory marketing.
  • Distinguish between different types of predatory marketing, with examples.
  • Describe digital media avenues used for predatory marketing.
  • Explain how targeted marketing of unhealthy food leads to negative health outcomes, particularly for certain populations.

Learning Objectives for Part II: What Health Departments Can Do to Combat Predatory Marketing

  • Describe ways to increase awareness of predatory marketing in communities.
  • Describe how local, state and federal governments can regulate predatory marketing.
  • List at least 2 actionable strategies for communities to decrease predatory marketing practices.
  • List 3 policy measures that could be taken to limit predatory marketing of unhealthy food at the city/local, state OR national level.

Launch Date: June 30th, 2020

Presenter:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor of Public Health, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy
Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute


Unhealthy food is the leading cause of premature death and preventable illness around the world today. Predatory marketing makes a significant contribution to this burden. Public health professionals can play an important role in reducing the prevalence and exposure to predatory marketing. This two-part training module develops an understanding of the current landscape of predatory marketing of unhealthy food and beverages, and how it promotes negative health outcomes particularly for vulnerable populations. This program will define the role of health departments in addressing predatory marketing, outline ways health departments can help document predatory marketing in their communities, and provide recommendations and examples of policy engagement activities public health professionals can get involved in.

Learning Objectives for Part I: Understanding Predatory Marketing

  • Define targeted and predatory marketing.
  • Distinguish between different types of predatory marketing, with examples.
  • Describe digital media avenues used for predatory marketing.
  • Explain how targeted marketing of unhealthy food leads to negative health outcomes, particularly for certain populations.

Learning Objectives for Part II: What Health Departments Can Do to Combat Predatory Marketing

  • Describe ways to increase awareness of predatory marketing in communities.
  • Describe how local, state and federal governments can regulate predatory marketing.
  • List at least 2 actionable strategies for communities to decrease predatory marketing practices.
  • List 3 policy measures that could be taken to limit predatory marketing of unhealthy food at the city/local, state OR national level.
Change Management: How Leadership can Support Staff During Crises

Course Objective

  • Explain key elements of the adaptive leadership model.
  • List the 4 dimensions of change readiness and list questions to be raised under each dimension.
  • Describe how a planned change initiative can be implemented using Kotter’s 8-step model.

Launch Date: June 30th, 2020

Subject Matter Expert:
Emil J. Sadloch
President, Sadloch Development Associates & Instructor for Rutgers University’s Executive and Professional Education
School of Public Health, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences


The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. This training is the second in the Strategic Skills Training Series focused on Change Management for Public Health Professionals. This module explains the utility of the adaptive leadership model and the 4 dimensions of change readiness to address public health workforce issues, specifically focusing on staff morale. It also guides you through Kotter’s 8-step model to plan, implement, and sustain change within an organization.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Explain key elements of the adaptive leadership model.
  2. List the 4 dimensions of change readiness and list questions to be raised under each dimension.
  3. Describe how a planned change initiative can be implemented using Kotter’s 8-step model.
An Overview of the Policy Process in Public Health and the Need for Systems Thinking

Course Objective

  • Explain the role of policy engagement in public health
  • Describe how policy is understood in a Public Health 3.0 context
  • Define the role of a public health agency in policy making
  • List ways that systems thinking concepts and tools can strengthen the policy process

Launch Date: June 30th, 2020

Presenter:
Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant


Engaging in policy making is an essential activity of public health agencies and staff to achieve the goals of Public Health 3.0 and to work collaboratively to address the social determinants of health. This training provides an overview of the policy making process as defined by the Centers for Disease Control, draws on the COVID-19 and other complex public health problems to discuss the challenges commonly faced by public health agencies during this policy process, and makes the case for using a systems thinking approach to overcome these policy roadblocks and address unintended consequences.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Explain the role of policy engagement in public health
  2. Describe how policy is understood in a Public Health 3.0 context
  3. Define the role of a public health agency in policy making
  4. List ways that systems thinking concepts and tools can strengthen the policy process
Problem Identification in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In

Course Objective

  • Explain Stage One of the policy making process i.e. Problem Identification
  • Describe how Systems Thinking tools and approaches can help visualize a problem
  • Describe how Systems Thinking tools and approaches can help define the boundaries of a problem

Launch Date: June 30th, 2020

Subject Matter Expert:
Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH (Public Health), MBA
Assistant Professor at Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health,
Associate Director of the Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program (AMDD) at Columbia University


This training describes how to implement the first stage of the CDC policy process – Problem Identification. Using a scenario focused on the opioid problem in fictitious Tycho County, the course discusses the practical steps that a health department, working in collaboration with key stakeholders, can take to describe and understand this complex problem. The course also explores how the application of systems thinking tools and approaches to make boundary decisions and visualize the problem using behavior over time graphs and rich pictures, can strengthen this stage of the policy making process.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Explain Stage One of the policy making process i.e. Problem Identification
  2. Describe how Systems Thinking tools and approaches can help visualize a problem
  3. Describe how Systems Thinking tools and approaches can help define the boundaries of a problem
Assessing your Audience for More Effective Cross-Sector Collaboration

Course Objective

  • Define an audience analysis
  • List approaches to audience analysis
  • Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on situational characteristics
  • Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on demographic characteristics
  • Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on audience disposition and motivation

Launch Date: June 30, 2020

Subject Matter Expert:
Nick Linardopoulos, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor & Public Speaking Coordinator
Rutgers University, School of Communication & Information, Department of Communication


Multi-sector collaboration is increasingly important for addressing health challenges. This training focuses on assessing audiences to develop tailored communication strategies for building collaborative partnerships. Using a case approach based in fictitious Tycho County, this training will describe the steps of developing an Audience Analysis strategy in order to build cross-sectoral partnerships to address opioid misuse.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Define an audience analysis
  2. List approaches to audience analysis
  3. Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on situational characteristics
  4. Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on demographic characteristics
  5. Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on audience disposition and motivation
Social Inequality and Health Disparities in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Course Objective

  • Identify key trends in health disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic to date
  • Describe how the pandemic exacerbates existing social inequalities
  • Examine several proposed interventions to address health disparities in the pandemic response

Date: June 2nd, 2020

Presenter:
Alexandra Zenoff, MPH.
Senior Program Manager
East-West Management Institute, Inc. (EWMI)


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar Alexandra Zenoff discusses the role of structural racism in health disparities, how this affects health outcomes and the need to address it. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated social inequalities and considering the social determinants of health is crucial to alleviating this issue. Drawing insights from historic and current public health efforts can help with designing responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. The importance of building on existing best practices like community consultations and appropriate data collection is discussed. Participants are provided with articles for further learning and resources such as the COVID-19 racial tracker and CDC’s Social Vulnerability Index.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Identify key trends in health disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic to date
  2. Describe how the pandemic exacerbates existing social inequalities
  3. Examine several proposed interventions to address health disparities in the pandemic response
Region 2 Public Health Training Center