Author: admin

Challenging Misinformation: Exploring Equity- and Community-Driven Strategies

Course Objective

  • Define terms such as “infodemic management”, and other current terminology as related to misinformation within a variety of interpersonal and media settings 
  • Discuss the link between misinformation, trust, and behavioral change, including issues surrounding the politicization of health information, historical reasons for mistrust among many groups, and the role of social media 
  • Describe promising equity-and community-driven strategies to: 
    • address misinformation 
    • build trust at the community and population levels  
    • strengthen communication systems to improve health, social, and policy outcomes 
  • Discuss relevant case studies and resource

Date: September 7th 2021

Presenter:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL
Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
Founder and Board President, Health Equity Initiative
Principal, Strategies for Equity and Communication Impact (SECI)


In this month’s Log-In2Learn webinar, Dr. Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL, surveys evidence-based systems strategies for health professionals to challenge misinformation. She begins by reviewing socio-ecological models from the science of trust, emphasizing the importance of social, political and environmental factors. While acknowledging the new challenges posed by social media, which does not rely on peer-review or fact-checking processes, she reminds us that misinformation is older than the information age, going over historical reasons for mistrust such as the Tuskegee syphilis study. She defines an effective infodemic response, goes over 7 types of mis/dis-information as well as healthy information behaviors. This background leads to the paradigm shift to equity- and community-driven strategies, which Dr.Schiavo breaks down by priority and explains how to incorporate into health promotion programming.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Define terms such as “infodemic management”, and other current terminology as related to misinformation within a variety of interpersonal and media settings 
  2. Discuss the link between misinformation, trust, and behavioral change, including issues surrounding the politicization of health information, historical reasons for mistrust among many groups, and the role of social media 
  3. Describe promising equity-and community-driven strategies to: address misinformation, build trust at the community and population levels , strengthen communication systems to improve health, social, and policy outcomes 
  4. Discuss relevant case studies and resource
Redefining Resilience in the Post-COVID Era

Course Objective

  • Discuss how COVID 19 has exacerbated disparities within health departments.
  • Describe how to utilize trauma informed principles to shift internal policies and procedures to support resiliency amongst staff.
  • Identify the stages of trauma resilience and implementation into policies.
  • Explain the importance of viewing staff as whole people within an equity and resilience framework.

Date: August 3rd, 2021

Presenter:
Mateo Belen, MSW
Trainer and Principle Consultant
A Mateo Consulting


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, Mateo Belen, MSW, discusses how organizations can shift internal policies and procedures to support resilience amongst staff in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. He begins by introducing us to basic trauma informed principles and explains the need to consider impacts based on race and gender. Belen highlights the need to acknowledge racism as a public health crisis and the importance of recognizing its effects amongst our employees in addition to the communities we serve. He then spends time talking about how resilience can be seen as a coping mechanism and how it can be fostered by organizations. He shares effective strategies that can be incorporated into work structures in order to support resilience and provide adequate backing to employees in times of crisis.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss how COVID 19 has exacerbated disparities within health departments.
  2. Describe how to utilize trauma informed principles to shift internal policies and procedures to support resiliency amongst staff.
  3. Identify the stages of trauma resilience and implementation into policies.
  4. Explain the importance of viewing staff as whole people within an equity and resilience framework.
Reducing Promotion and Consumption of Ultra-Processed Food

Course Objective

  • Define and explain the impact of ultra-processed food on human and planetary health
  • List factors that contribute to the ubiquity of ultra-processed foods
  • Describe how health professionals can raise public awareness of the harms of ultra-processed food via media literacy and social marketing
  • Identify at least two policy interventions to address misleading product packaging and unhealthy product formulations
  • Describe how taxation and regulation approaches can be used to combat ultra-processed food
  • Describe strategies to promote and subsidize healthy food and beverages, including tap water

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject Matter Experts: 
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor of Public Health, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy & Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Craig Willingham, MPH
Deputy Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Erinn C. Bacchus, MPH
Doctoral Student, Community Health and Health Policy
Graduate Student Assistant, Healthy CUNY

Jessica Walsh, MPH
Assistant, CUNY School of Public Health


This two-part course developed by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center (PHTC) aims to understand ultra-processed food and explore how health departments can combat the promotion of ultra-processed food.

In Part I, we will develop a better understanding of ultra-processed food, and how it promotes negative health outcomes particularly for some populations.

In Part II, we will explore how health departments can combat the promotion of ultra-processed food.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define and explain the impact of ultra-processed food on human and planetary health
  2. List factors that contribute to the ubiquity of ultra-processed foods
  3. Describe how health professionals can raise public awareness of the harms of ultra-processed food via media literacy and social marketing
  4. Identify at least two policy interventions to address misleading product packaging and unhealthy product formulations
  5. Describe how taxation and regulation approaches can be used to combat ultra-processed food
  6. Describe strategies to promote and subsidize healthy food and beverages, including tap water
Community Engagement: The People’s Approach to Improving Health and Social Outcomes

Course Objective

  • Define community engagement
  • Discuss why community engagement is critical in advancing health and social equity
  • Describe the role of local health departments (LHDs) in engaging local communities and their leaders in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health interventions and policies
  • List best practices, strategies, and participatory processes for community dialogue and engagement
  • Discuss ways to integrate community engagement in public health practice

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject  Matter Expert: 
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL
Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Founder and Board President, Health Equity Initiative; Principal, Strategies for Equity and Communication Impact (SECI)


This course developed by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center (PHTC) focuses on community engagement, and the role of local health departments in engaging local communities. It focuses on strategies for “true” community engagement, which is about collaborating with and empowering local communities, and recognizing the expert in every community member and every leader representing the community. It also provides an overview of case studies, best practices and strategies for community dialogue and engagement and/or integrating community engagement in public health practice.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define community engagement
  2. Discuss why community engagement is critical in advancing health and social equity
  3. Describe the role of local health departments (LHDs) in engaging local communities and their leaders in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health interventions and policies
  4. List best practices, strategies, and participatory processes for community dialogue and engagement
  5. Discuss ways to integrate community engagement in public health practice
Policy Analysis in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In

Course Objective

  • Define Stage Two of the CDC policy process i.e. Policy Analysis
  • List types of evidence that can be reviewed as part of the policy analysis phase
  • Assess feasibility of available policy options via framing questions and rubrics
  • Identify and define key variables in a complex public health issue
  • Sketch and interpret a simple systems map/ causal loop diagram
  • Define and identify leverage points in a system and assess their potential impact on the system
  • Discuss the importance of systems modeling and explore how systems models can be used to ask and answer policy-relevant questions

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject Matter Experts:  
Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH (Public Health), MBA
Assistant Professor at Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, and Associate Director of the Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program (AMDD) at Columbia University

&

Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant


The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist.

Using a scenario focused on the opioid problem in the fictitious ‘Tycho County’, this course will describe how the ‘Policy Analysis’ stage of the CDC policy process can be implemented by a health department using systems thinking tools and approaches.

Recommended Pre-Requisites:

  1. An Overview of the Policy Process in Public Health and the Need for Systems Thinking
  2. Problem Identification in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define Stage Two of the CDC policy process i.e. Policy Analysis
  2. List types of evidence that can be reviewed as part of the policy analysis phase
  3. Assess feasibility of available policy options via framing questions and rubrics
  4. Identify and define key variables in a complex public health issue
  5. Sketch and interpret a simple systems map/ causal loop diagram
  6. Define and identify leverage points in a system and assess their potential impact on the system
  7. Discuss the importance of systems modeling and explore how systems models can be used to ask and answer policy-relevant questions
Strategy and Policy Development in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In

Course Objective

  • Define Stage Three of the CDC policy process i.e. Strategy and Policy Development
  • Describe the steps that Health Departments can follow to develop an enactment strategy and draft an actual policy
  • Understand how systems thinking tools can help strengthen the strategy and policy development process

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject Matter Experts: 
Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant

&

Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH (Public Health), MBA
Assistant Professor at Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, and Associate Director of the Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program (AMDD) at Columbia University


The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist.

 

Using a scenario focused on the opioid problem in the fictitious ‘Tycho County’, this course will describe how the ‘Strategy and Policy Development’ stage of the CDC policy process can be implemented by a health department using systems thinking tools and approaches.

 

Recommended Pre-Requisites:

  1. An Overview of the Policy Process in Public Health and the Need for Systems Thinking
  2. Problem Identification in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In
  3. Policy Analysis in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define Stage Three of the CDC policy process i.e. Strategy and Policy Development
  2. Describe the steps that Health Departments can follow to develop an enactment strategy and draft an actual policy
  3. Understand how systems thinking tools can help strengthen the strategy and policy development process
Succession Planning and Workforce Development for Public Health Agencies

Course Objective

  • Define “succession planning” for public health agencies
  • Present the reasons for a succession planning process in public health agencies, even during challenging times
  • Explain the key elements of the succession planning process
  • Link the elements of change management to organizational succession planning
  • Clarify the critical success factors for succession planning in public health

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject Matter  Expert: 
Emil J. Sadloch
President, Sadloch Development Associates & Instructor for Rutgers University’s Executive and Professional Education, School of Public Health, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences


The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist.

This course describes how health departments can undertake succession planning and workforce development efforts, even during ‘VUCA’ (volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous) times, using a case study approach set in the fictitious Tycho County.

Recommended Pre-Requisites:

  1. Introduction to Change Management
  2. Change Management: How Leadership Can Support Staff During Crises

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define “succession planning” for public health agencies
  2. Present the reasons for a succession planning process in public health agencies, even during challenging times
  3. Explain the key elements of the succession planning process
  4. Link the elements of change management to organizational succession planning
  5. Clarify the critical success factors for succession planning in public health
Making Community Colleges and Public Universities Incubators Of Health Equity For Young Adults

Course Objective

  • Describe how the coivd-19 pandemic and its economic consequences, Black Lives Matter and other recent movements campaigning for social justice, and emerging federal higher education policies create an opportunity to strengthen the role of institutions of higher education in promoting health equity among young adults.
  • Explain how community colleges and public universities can contribute to reducing racial/ethnic and class inequities in health, academic and life success among young people enrolled in the community colleges and public universities that serve populations previously excluded from higher education
  • Identify specific roles public health and other professionals in health departments, health care and social service institutions, and higher education can play in the development of equity enhancing policies, programs and environments 
  • Describe how these institutions of higher education can expand and strengthen programs to promote mental health, food security, sexual and reproductive health and health care access, four challenges that can undermine academic success 

Date: June 1, 2021

Presenter:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor of Public Health City University of New York School of Public Health and Health Policy
Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Erinn C. Bacchus, MPH
Doctoral Student, Community Health and Health Policy
Graduate Student Assistant, Healthy CUNY

 


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH and Erinn C. Bacchus, MPH, discuss how community colleges and public universities can contribute to reducing racial, ethnic and class inequities in health, academic and life success among young people. After a brief overview of trends related to student demographics, tuition and public support over the past 25 years, the speakers highlight the unique health challenges experienced by students of color and those from low income backgrounds. They then walk us through ways in which universities can move from stratifying students to building equity. These include how to support and engage students to promote health, how to create cultures of inclusion, how to partner with public and private institutions and how to use data to inform strategies. They end by addressing pertinent questions from audience members regarding self advocacy and best ways to hold institutions accountable.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain how community colleges and public universities can contribute to reducing racial/ethnic and class inequities in health, academic and life success among young people enrolled in the community colleges and public universities that serve populations previously excluded from higher education
  2. Describe how these institutions of higher education can expand and strengthen programs to promote mental health, food security, sexual and reproductive health and health care access, four challenges that can undermine academic success
  3. Identify specific roles public health and other professionals in health departments, health care and social service institutions, and higher education can play in the development of equity enhancing policies, programs and environments
  4. Describe how the coivd-19 pandemic and its economic consequences, Black Lives Matter and other recent movements campaigning for social justice, and emerging federal higher education policies create an opportunity to strengthen the role of institutions of higher education in promoting health equity among young adults.
State changes to alcohol availability during COVID-19: What can state/local public health departments do to protect communities’ health?

Course Objective

  • Describe trends in alcohol use and related harms over the last two decades.
  • Explain state level changes to alcohol availability during the pandemic.
  • Summarize state and local public health strategies to curtail industry sponsored efforts to increase in alcohol availability to protect population level harms.

Date: May 4th 2021

Presenter:
Sean J. Haley, PhD, MPH
Asst. Professor of Health Policy and Management
City University of New York’s Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, Sean J. Haley, PhD, MPH, addresses the alarming increase in alcohol availability and consumption over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. He starts by providing context to the state of Alcohol Use Disorders amongst the U.S. population over the years. In detail, he then discusses the changes in attitudes and behaviors towards alcohol as the pandemic began to worsen and stay-at-home orders were placed. He highlights the unique characteristics of this increased consumption, identifying individual, social and structural factors. Dr. Haley makes sure to emphasize that this is not a temporary problem and substantiates his statement with research from past disasters, decade long trends and industry motivations. He then switches to what can be done to control this problem. He walks us through the many action steps, at varying levels, that can be taken by state and local public health departments in order to protect communities’ health.

Participants will learn the following:

  1. Describe trends in alcohol use and related harms over the last two decades.
  2. Explain state level changes to alcohol availability during the pandemic.
  3. Summarize state and local public health strategies to curtail industry sponsored efforts to increase in alcohol availability to protect population level harms.
Breaking Through Public Health Bureaucracy: tools and tips to successfully navigate internal administration and processes

Course Objective

  • Describe how the federal government appropriates funding to public health agencies and other entities
  • Describe the key challenges faced by health departments implementing federally funded programs
  • Identify 3 strategies to overcome challenges and enhance efficiency in program implementation

Date: April 6, 2021

Presenter:
Jennifer McKeever, MSW, MPH
Founder and Principal of WE Public Health, LLC

&

Rishika Desai, MPH
Senior Analyst at the Association of State and Territorial Health Official (ASTHO)


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Jennifer McKeever, MSW, MPH & Rishika Desai, MPH, discuss the complexities of public health bureaucracy and the best ways to navigate it. They start by talking about what these bureaucratic issues might look like, how the pandemic has impacted them and the type of problems they might create at different levels. Jennifer and Rishika go on to describe how the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) tried to assess this in their recent qualitative study and highlight some of the key findings and recommendations for overcoming administrative bottlenecks that slow down program implementation. Through a conversation with the audience on what difficulties they’ve experienced, our presenters try to determine the common root causes. Lastly, they share ways in which agencies have responded to these challenges, now and in the past, and guide us through the unique steps that research has helped identify as tools to solve at least some of the bureaucratic problems we face in public health.

Participants will learn  the following:

  1. Describe how the federal government appropriates funding to public health agencies and other entities
  2. Describe the key challenges faced by health departments implementing federally funded programs
  3. Identify 3 strategies to overcome challenges and enhance efficiency in program implementation
Region 2 Public Health Training Center