Category: Community Dimensions of Practice

Primary Competency Area

A public health perspective on dismantling systemic racism: What role for health departments?

Course Objective

  • Explain why state and local health departments have the opportunity, mandate, capacity and imperative to take action to dismantle elements of systemic racism that harm health
  • Give examples of specific actions health departments can take to interrupt pathways by which racially disparate access to healthy food, criminal justice policies, and educational policies contribute to the health burdens of Black, Latinx, indigenous, and other populations of color.
  • Identify one or more ways that they can take action now within their institution to strengthen its actions designed to dismantle systemic racism

Date: September 1, 2020

Presenters
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH

Erinn Bacchus, MPH

Craig Willingham, MPH

City University of New York Urban Food Policy Institute


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, participants learn about three distinct approaches to address the intersections between public health and systemic racism in the United States. Dr. Nicholas Freudenburg, DrPH, MPH, discusses the relationship between the key determinants of health and racism and the need to end the inequitable provisions of education, housing and healthcare by creating communities of opportunity. Errin Bachhus, MPH, addresses racism in the criminal justice system and the role of public health organizations. In light of recent incidents of police brutality, she highlights the need to reevaluate the role of police departments and the best ways for health departments to intervene through programs and policy. Craig Willingham, MPH, examines how food policy can be crucial in increasing racial equity. He reviews the Good Food Purchasing Program and other city-wide efforts and shares how they can be targeted at minority groups to help alleviate inequities. Lastly, the speakers suggest a to-do list for public health organizations to actively make changes to current structures, provide creative examples to inspire action and recommend books to further broaden perspectives.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain why state and local health departments have the opportunity, mandate, capacity and imperative to take action to dismantle elements of systemic racism that harm health
  2. Give examples of specific actions health departments can take to interrupt pathways by which racially disparate access to healthy food, criminal justice policies, and educational policies contribute to the health burdens of Black, Latinx, indigenous, and other populations of color.
  3. Identify one or more ways that they can take action now within their institution to strengthen its actions designed to dismantle systemic racism.
Assessing your Audience for More Effective Cross-Sector Collaboration

Course Objective

  • Define an audience analysis
  • List approaches to audience analysis
  • Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on situational characteristics
  • Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on demographic characteristics
  • Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on audience disposition and motivation

Launch Date: June 30, 2020

Subject Matter Expert:
Nick Linardopoulos, PhD
Assistant Teaching Professor & Public Speaking Coordinator
Rutgers University, School of Communication & Information, Department of Communication


Multi-sector collaboration is increasingly important for addressing health challenges. This training focuses on assessing audiences to develop tailored communication strategies for building collaborative partnerships. Using a case approach based in fictitious Tycho County, this training will describe the steps of developing an Audience Analysis strategy in order to build cross-sectoral partnerships to address opioid misuse.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Define an audience analysis
  2. List approaches to audience analysis
  3. Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on situational characteristics
  4. Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on demographic characteristics
  5. Describe how to conduct an audience analysis based on audience disposition and motivation
Social Inequality and Health Disparities in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Course Objective

  • Identify key trends in health disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic to date
  • Describe how the pandemic exacerbates existing social inequalities
  • Examine several proposed interventions to address health disparities in the pandemic response

Date: June 2nd, 2020

Presenter:
Alexandra Zenoff, MPH.
Senior Program Manager
East-West Management Institute, Inc. (EWMI)


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar Alexandra Zenoff discusses the role of structural racism in health disparities, how this affects health outcomes and the need to address it. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated social inequalities and considering the social determinants of health is crucial to alleviating this issue. Drawing insights from historic and current public health efforts can help with designing responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. The importance of building on existing best practices like community consultations and appropriate data collection is discussed. Participants are provided with articles for further learning and resources such as the COVID-19 racial tracker and CDC’s Social Vulnerability Index.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Identify key trends in health disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic to date
  2. Describe how the pandemic exacerbates existing social inequalities
  3. Examine several proposed interventions to address health disparities in the pandemic response
Shifting the Narrative: Trauma Informed Care to Systems Change

Course Objective

  • Develop a shared understanding of the importance of viewing trauma on a systems level
  • Identify how to utilize trauma informed principles in organizational policy and program development
  • Explain the stages of trauma informed organizational change development and implementation

Date: March 3rd, 2020

Presenter:
Ali Mateo Belen, MSW
Trainer and Principle Consultant
A Mateo Consulting


This month’s Log-in2Learn Webinar takes a look at trauma-informed principles and procedures, encouraging organizations and systems to acknowledge and recognize the trauma that individuals experience. Participants will learn how understanding individual trauma/manifestations of trauma, reflect in the way systems are able to give care to clients and workers within the organization. Participants will also be able to differentiate between policies and practice and learn ways to implement practices that not only benefit clients, but also benefit employees.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Develop a shared understanding of the importance of viewing trauma on a systems level
  2. Identify how to utilize trauma informed principles in organizational policy and program development
  3. Explain the stages of trauma informed organizational change development and implementation
Engaging Communities in the Research Process to Enhance Outcomes and Sustainability: Practical Strategies for Researchers and Public Health Practitioners
Illustration of Group of People Moving

Course Objective

  • Name the different levels of community engagement that researchers can participate in.
  • Describe the importance of understanding and involving the communities you are researching.
  • Define cultural humility.

Date: November 7, 2017

Presenter:
Carly Hutchinson, PhD, MA
Researcher and Lecturer, Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a research method that equitably involves all community and academic partners in every step of designing and conducting research. CBPR allows community members to research a topic that is important to them and improves their health. This course provides practical strategies to help people engage in a more successful way with communities using CBPR. CBPR is successful because of the relevancy of a co-developed research project and greater community buy-in, both of which lead to better outcomes and sustainability.

Dr. Hutchinson describes the Community Engagement Continuum for the various ways in which researchers can involve communities in their research, and provides two case studies for how this has been done. She gives further tips on how to get started trying CBPR and makes a strong case for its value.

Social Movements in Public Health
Group of People in Protest

Course Objective

  • Describe the interrelationship between social movements and public health.
  • Compare past and present social movements that have/ have had public health implications.
  • Identify how public health practice can partner with social movement actors to promote health.

Date: August 25, 2016

Presenter:
James Colgrove PhD, MPH
Professor of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Merlin Chowkwunyun PhD
Assistant Professor of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Peggy Shepard
Executive Director
WE ACT For Environmental Justice


Social movements throughout US history have brought about positive changes in economic conditions, environmental protections, and human rights that have directly or indirectly affected population health. It is important for public health professionals to understand the relationship between social movements and public health and how that relationship can be harnessed to improve health outcomes. This training provides examples of the wide range of social movement strategies and approaches that have been used in US history and discuss the challenges that these movements have faced. Last, this training details how WE ACT For Environmental Justice of West Harlem has successfully approached deteriorating environmental conditions and health inequalities.

The Physical and Mental Health Problems of the Prison Population
Light Shining in Dark Prison Cell

Course Objective

  • Identify national data on the incidence and prevalence of chronic disease among the incarcerated population
  • Recognize the limited resources available to support inmate reentry into the community

Date: April 7, 2016

Presenter:
Arthur M. Brewer, MD, CCHP
Statewide Medical Director
Rutgers University – University Correctional Health Care


This seminar reviews the health status of the incarcerated persons, including local jails and prison inmates. Dr. Brewer will discuss mortality rates, chronic disease prevalence, mental health prevalence and substance abuse/dependency data from a national perspective. He will discuss some challenging issues around substance abuse treatment and perceptions about mental health within prisons and local jails. Dr. Brewer will also discuss limited resources particularly as it relates to treatment of hepatitis C virus infection. It concludes with a review of challenges and efforts with inmate reentry into the community.

Energy Insecurity: Understanding Its Dimensions and Implications for Public Health
House Cut-out With Heart in the Middle

Course Objective

  • Explain the primary dimensions of energy insecurity
  • Describe how energy insecurity is related to other forms of insecurity (i.e. food and housing)
  • Discuss the public health implications of energy insecurity

Date: June 2, 2015

Reviewed June 30, 2020

Presenter:
Diana Hernandez, PhD
Assistant Professor, Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
JPB Environmental Health Fellow, Harvard School of Public Health


In this webinar, Dr. Hernandez provides an overview of energy insecurity, its relationship with health outcomes, and solutions to prevent and treat energy insecurity.

Syndemics and HIV among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in the U.S.: Understanding Risk in Context
Two Hands Wrapped Together by and Holding Red Ribbon

Course Objective

  • Define a syndemic
  • List key components of the syndemic affecting Black and Latino MSM in the US
  • Describe how the concept of syndemics increase our ability to intervene upon the disparities in HIV/AIDS affecting MSM of color in the US

Date: May 5, 2015

Reviewed June 30, 2020

Presenter:
Patrick Wilson, PhD, MA
Associate Professor, Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


Syndemics offer a useful framework through which we can potentially explain enhanced HIV risk among MSM in that it describe “clustering” of different physiological and sociological epidemics by person, place, or time. Dr. Patrick Wilson discusses the problem of HIV in our own country – where the prevalence of HIV in black and Latino communities is high and where the HIV epidemic tends to be increasing in MSM in the US. This webinar takes a look at how looking at, and targeting the behavioral, social, and structural factors that influence disparities in HIV epidemic in black and white MSM may help to address said disparities in comprehensive, “de-silo’ed” ways.

Region 2 Public Health Training Center