Category: Communication

Primary Competency Area

The Swag Deficit: How and Why Public Health Sucks All The Fun Out of Everything

Course Objective

  • Understand primary gaps and weaknesses in how public health presents itself and engages communities
  • Define and discuss “swag deficit” at a barbeque or cocktail party
  • Identify ways to develop a swag surplus or make your public health organization swag neutral

Date: September 5, 2023

Presenter:
Jerel Ezell, PhD MPH
Director of Cornell Center for Cultural Humility
Assistant Professor in General Medicine
Weill Cornell University


Jerel Ezell presents on the importance of “swag” and what that means in the context of public health departments working to build a stronger public presence. He begins by describing three primary factors that contribute to a “swag deficit”. Ezell goes on to discuss approaches for engaging with communities. He ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps.

Participants will be able to:

  • Understand primary gaps and weaknesses in how public health presents itself and engages communities
  • Define and discuss “swag deficit” at a barbeque or cocktail party 
  • Identify ways to develop a swag surplus or make your public health organization swag neutral
A Systems Approach to Reduce Gun Violence

Course Objective

  • Discuss the public health approach to addressing gun violence
  • Discuss the applicability of systems thinking to address gun violence
  • Describe the roles that local public health agencies can play to address gun violence, including supporting gun safety

Date: July 1, 2023

Gun violence is a major public health issue causing significant death, injuries and years of life lost. Gun violence and gun safety are complex public health problems and challenges that can benefit from a systems-thinking approach. This self-paced module course will focus on how local health departments can take action to address gun violence in their communities. The course describes two examples of how different counties in the state are applying the public health approach to gun violence in their communities and using systems thinking to help define the problem and identify risk factors and areas to intervene.

Recruitment and Retention in Public Health

Course Objectives

  • List the six steps in the recruitment process
  • List tools you can use to prioritize the positions you need to fill
  • Describe how diversity, equity, and inclusion are part of each step of the recruitment and retention process
  • Explain the importance of a well-written job description, and how a description is different from a job posting or job advertisement
  • Describe the basics of recruitment marketing and employer branding
  • Identify at least three potential partners for developing recruitment partnerships
  • Explain how to improve communications with job candidates
  • List key elements of onboarding and retention

Date: July 1, 2023


In this self-paced module course, Dr. Heather Krasna, Associate Dean, Career Services and Professional Development at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, provides a crash course on recruitment and retention of new hires, from start to finish.

Confronting Barriers to Vaccine Acceptance: Create Effective Communication Using Behavioral Science

Course Objective

  • Describe vaccine hesitancy/vaccine confidence and why it is an important public health issue
  • Define behavioral science
  • Apply the Health Belief Model (HBM) to design vaccine messaging
  • Describe approaches to using behavioral science to combat misinformation about vaccines and build trust and confidence in vaccines and health care providers
  • Explain how these principles apply to current public health challenges that are described in case studies, including flu, COVID, and childhood vaccines

Date: June 30, 2023


This self-paced module course outlines how to confront barriers to vaccine acceptance by creating effective communication using behavioral science, health literacy, and techniques to combat misinformation. It provides an introduction to the key tools from each of those fields, then instructs on the five-step process of developing vaccine communications. It includes case studies to show how these principles have been applied in a real-world setting. This course is appropriate for anyone communicating about vaccination, from healthcare workers in one-on-one communications to public health promotion specialists developing full communication campaigns.

Public Health’s “Equity Clout” Problem: What Is It And How Do We Address It To Achieve Structural and Cultural Humility?

Course Objectives

  • Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  • Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  • Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.

Date: June 04, 2023

Presenter:
Jerel Ezell, PhD, MPH
Director, Cornell Center for Cultural Humility
Assistant Professor in General Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine


Dr. Jerel Ezell presents on the importance of equity clout and what that means in the context of public health departments working to build structural and cultural humility. He begins by describing three primary factors that contribute to diminished equity clout. Ezell goes on to discuss approaches for bridging the equity clout gap. He ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  2. Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  3. Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.
The Science of Trust: Implications for Public Health Research and Practice

Course Objective

  • List key determinants of trust and trustworthiness at the community, population, and patient levels
  • Discuss the impact of trust and mistrust on behavioral and social outcomes as related to a variety of health topics
  • Describe implications of “the science of trust” for public health research and practice

Date: March 7, 2023

Presenter:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


Renata Schiavo presents on the importance of trust in public health research and practice. She begins by defining “trust” and explaining the importance of gaining trust among communities. Schiavo goes on to discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted trust and presents commonly used models of trust. “The science of trust” is then explained by the interconnected nature of biological, social, political and environmental factors, and a new model of trust is presented. Schiavo ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps

Participants will learn about trust in public health research and practice from Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL, from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.Participants will be able to:-List key determinants of trust and trustworthiness at the community, population, and patient levels-Discuss the impact of trust and mistrust on behavioral and social outcomes as related to a variety of health topics-Describe implications of “the science of trust” for public health research and practiceRecommended Reading:-Renata Schiavo (2022) The ‘Science of Trust’: moving the field forward, Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 15:2, 75-77, DOI: 10.1080/17538068.2022.2089611https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538068.2022.2089611-Renata Schiavo (Moderator and Roundtable Chair/Organizer), Gil Eyal (Participant), Rafael Obregon (Participant), Sandra C. Quinn (Participant), Helen Riess (Participant) & Nikita Boston-Fisher (Co-Organizer) (2022) The science of trust: future directions, research gaps, and implications for health and risk communication, Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 15:4, 245-259, DOI: 10.1080/17538068.2022.2121199https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538068.2022.2121199

 

This program has been approved for 1.0 Category I Continuing Education Credit for CHES/MCHES by the Rutgers School of Public Health. The Rutgers School of Public Health is a certified CHES/MCHES provider by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc.

This program has been approved for 1.0 Certified in Public Health (CPH) credit by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center. The Region 2 Public Health Training Center is a certified CPH provider by the National Board of Public Health Examiners.

Leveraging a bilingual communications campaign to promote physical activity: Muévete a tu Manera

Course Objective

  • Discuss the recommendations in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition and key findings to be communicated 
  • Identify physical activity trends and diabetes prevalence in Spanish speaking populations 
  • Describe how communities can leverage Muévete a tu Manera campaign to promote physical activity for Spanish speakers 

Date: January 10th, 2023

Presenter:
Joshua Chigozie Ogbuefi, MPH
Health Communications Fellow
Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
U.S Department of Health and Human Services 


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Joshua Chigozie Ogbuefi discusses the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans 2nd edition (Guidelines) and its key recommendations and findings related to how much physical activity Americans need and the benefits of physical activity, including the prevention of chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes. Additionally, Ogbuefi identifies current physical activity rates among U.S populations and the estimated burden of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes among Spanish speaking populations. Lastly, Ogbuefi highlights a bilingual communications campaign that focuses on increasing awareness and knowledge of the Guidelines, physical activity self-efficacy, and changing behavior. Ogbuefi describes how organizations can leverage the campaign to promote physical activity in their communities.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the recommendations in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition and key findings to be communicated 
  2. Identify physical activity trends and diabetes prevalence in Spanish speaking populations 
  3. Describe how communities can leverage Muévete a tu Manera campaign to promote physical activity for Spanish speakers 
Adaptive Leadership: Strategies for Public Health

Course Objective

  • List highlights of the leadership approach known as “Adaptive Leadership”
  • Describe situational challenges as technical or adaptive
  • Identify the three phases of the “Adaptive Leadership” process
  • Apply the “Adaptive Leadership” behaviors to situations facing public health professionals

Date: December 6th, 2022

Presenter:
Emil J. Sadloch
SADLOCH DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Emil Sadloch presents on the leadership approach known as “Adaptive Leadership.” He begins by defining “Adaptative Leadership” and explaining the difference between technical and adaptive situational challenges. He goes on to describe the three phases of the “Adaptive Leadership” model: Observe, Interpret, and Intervene. Sadloch ends by presenting a case study and explaining how “Adaptive Leadership” can be applied to a current public health issue.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List highlights of the leadership approach known as “Adaptive Leadership”
  2. Describe situational challenges as technical or adaptive
  3. Identify the three phases of the “Adaptive Leadership” process 
  4. Apply the “Adaptive Leadership” behaviors to situations facing public health professionals 
Question, Persuade, and Refer: Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention

Course Objective

  • Define the scope and scale of suicide as a public health issue in the US
  • Describe the warning signs common to someone experiencing thoughts of suicide
  • List practical steps they can take if they have encountered someone experiencing current thoughts of suicide

Date: November 1st, 2022

Presenter:
Garra Lloyd-Lester
Coordinator of Community and Coalition Initiatives
Suicide Prevention Center of New York


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Garra Lloyd-Lester presents on training for suicide prevention. He begins by describing the scope and scale of suicide in the US. He then explains sensitive and trauma-informed language, how to invite people to talk about suicide, and suicide clues and warning signs. Finally, Lloyd-Lester explains the Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) method for suicide prevention.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Define the scope and scale of suicide as a public health issue in the US
  2. Describe the warning signs common to someone experiencing thoughts of suicide
  3. List practical steps they can take if they have encountered someone experiencing current thoughts of suicide
Communicate More Effectively: Psychological Principles to Change Behavior and Improve Outcomes

Course Objective

  • Describe what behavioral economics is, with examples of behavioral economics in action
  • Understand how to create messaging for disseminating public health data and information using behavioral economics principles
  • List and explain some key biases related to communicating information to influence behavior and improve health
  • Discuss some ethical considerations around the use of behavioral economics in communication

Date: June 30th, 2022

Presenter:
Suzanne Kirkendall, MPH
CEO, BVA Nudge Consulting North America


This course empowers public health professionals to communicate more effectively with the public. To do so, learners will discover the basics of behavioral economics, key psychological principles that are important in communications, and the five-step process for how to apply these principles to their communications ethically and effectively. This is illustrated with a case study on how these new skills could be applied to a real-life situation.

Learners will be able to:

  1. Describe what behavioral economics is, with examples of behavioral economics in action
  2. Understand how to create messaging for disseminating public health data and information using behavioral economics principles
  3. List and explain some key biases related to communicating information to influence behavior and improve health
  4. Discuss some ethical considerations around the use of behavioral economics in communication
Region 2 Public Health Training Center