Category: Diversity and Inclusion

Strategic Skill Area

Socio-structural factors, health disparities, and the uptake of biomedical HIV prevention for Black Men who have Sex with Men (MSM)
Two Black Men

Course Objective

  • Describe how factors not directly related to biomedical HIV prevention (e.g., the labor market, law enforcement, gendered expectations) influence how Black MSM approach HIV prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis
  • Give examples of how factors across multiple levels (e.g., structural, community, interpersonal) impact how Black MSM engage with biomedical HIV prevention
  • Describe what types of multi-level approaches might facilitate Black MSM’s uptake of PrEP. Describe how can we balance the development of more proximate interventions (e.g., education campaigns) with large scale interventions (e.g., expanding insurance access) that might have a larger impact

Date: September 11, 2017

Presenter:
Morgan Philbin, PhD, MHS
Assistant Professor
Columbia University University Mailman School of Public Health


Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are at significantly higher risk of HIV. This is due to a complex interplay between socio-structural factors and their own intersectional identities. In this webinar, Dr Philbin describes her ethnographic study examining how factors at all levels of the social-ecological model shape healthcare behavior for black MSM and how they access PreP, as well as her sub-study about structural barriers to access. Some of these barriers included misunderstanding about PreP’s effectiveness and side-effects, concerns that it would decrease others’ condom use, distrust in the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare providers, precarious housing, the structure of the labor market, gendered healthcare systems, institutional and normative gender rules, and stigma. Dr Philbin highlights the importance of reducing barriers at all levels, particularly at the structural level in areas of stigma, employment, and housing. The implications include the need to eliminate the relationship between employment and access to healthcare, enacting policies that regulate shift work (scheduling and pay), creating clinical spaces that welcome all types of men, and expanding the PreP Assistance Program.

Caring for Vulnerable Populations in School Health
Diverse Group of Toddlers

Course Objective

  • Describe how vulnerable populations are identified in the school setting.
  • Give examples of the issues (medical, mental, social) commonly faced by students in vulnerable populations.
  • List methods to increase community and school involvement in the care of students in vulnerable populations.

Date: September 5, 2017

Presenter:
Natalie Mathurin, MD, MPH
Medical Director at Student Health Services
School District of Philadelphia

Cheryl Lawrence, MD
Medical Director at the Office of School Health-Family and Child Health
New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


Dr. Mathurin and Dr. Lawrence describe the purpose and goals of programs developed to aid children that belong to vulnerable populations using the New York City Department of Health as a case study. The beginning of the presentation considers data about vulnerable populations in New York City and why it is important to address health of children in these populations. The presenters then present the mission, objectives, frameworks, and activities of programs to care for students in vulnerable populations.

A Community-Based Organization’s Approach to Addressing LGBT Health Disparities
Colorful Balloons in Shape of a Rainbow

Course Objective

  • Identify the social and medical barriers that impact health outcomes for these various communities
  • Cite examples of culturally sensitive and inclusive programing for LGBTQ communities

Date: February 28, 2017

Presenter:
Gary Paul Wright
Founder and Executive Director
African American Office of Gay Concerns


This session will describe how the African American Office of Gay Concerns (AAOGC), a non-profit agency in Newark, NJ, has made great impacts in the health of the LGBT communities, with a particular emphasis on addressing health disparities in the LGBT community. The session focuses on the social and medical barriers regularly faced by members of the LGBT community.

Structural Factors and Sexual Orientation Health Disparities in Adolescent Substance Use: A Multi-level Analysis
Male Passing Female Drugs

Course Objective

  • Explain why it is important to understand structural causes of health disparities among sexual minority youth.
  • Describe why substance use disparities might be a large and persistent cause of disparate morbidity among sexual minority youth.
  • List potential outcomes to expect for sexual orientation substance use disparities among youth given the changing political landscape.

Date: December 6, 2016

Presenter:
M. Somjen Frazer
PhD Student, ABD in Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


In this webinar, Ms. Frazer discusses the substance use disparities among sexual minority youth, specifically in the realms of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana and other drugs. She discusses why these disparities exist, and explores what the structural determinants of these disparities are, including structural stigma and policy environments.

Critical Consciousness-based Health Promotion Interventions for Racial and Sexual Minority Populations
Two Black Men Laughing

Course Objective

  • Define Critical Consciousness
  • Describe the Mobilizing our Voices for Empowerment (MOVE) intervention for young Black gay/bisexual men living with HIV
  • Discuss current and future critical consciousness intervention research

Date: November 1, 2016

Presenter:
Patrick Wilson, PhD
Associate Professor Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


Critical Consciousness involves becoming aware of the broader social, political, and cultural forces that perpetuate oppression and inequality. Helping to raise individuals’ awareness and recognition of such forces in their daily lives can fuel empowerment, self-esteem, and other precursors to positive health behavior change. In this webinar, Dr. Patrick Wilson will discuss how critical consciousness can be used to support behavior change interventions for marginalized groups, such as black MSM youth.

Safety and Respect for All: Providing a Supportive Environment for LGBT Individuals and Families During a Disaster
Family in Therapy Session

Course Objective

  • Distinguish between sexual orientation and gender identity / expressions and identity terminology currently being used
  • Identify and promote protective factors for sexual minorities
  • List knowledge, attitudes and skills needed to create a safe and inclusive environment

Date: September 21, 2016

Presenter:
Phil McCabe, CSW, CAS
Rutgers School of Public Health and Rutgers School of Nursing


Public health emergency response activities, including disaster response such as sheltering, are a core function of local and state governmental public health. It is important that public health professionals recognize the unique needs of the many community groups they serve. With an emphasis on cultural competency, this session addresses the unique needs of the LGBTQ community, and suggests ways in which public health can work to provide a safe environment for members of that community during disasters.

Sex Differences in the Relationship between Social Stressors and Obesity
Person Stepping on Scale

Course Objective

  • Describe the challenges in defining social stressors across the life course
  • Explain the importance of examining sex differences and the effect of social stressors on obesity
  • List the potential mechanisms by which social stressors impact obesity

Date: April 5, 2016

Presenter:
Shakira F. Suglia, ScD, MD
Associate Professor, Epidemiology
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


In this webinar, Dr. Suglia provides an overview of the physiological responses to stressors and their relationship to obesity. Stressors have a significant impact on mental and physical health, with high levels of stress associated with eating disorders and obesity. There is also a sociodemographic gradient within this relationship, meaning that individuals with low SES experience a greater number of social risk factors and suffer more frequently from obesity. This disparity is also seen between genders, with girls and women experiencing more stress than their male counterparts.

Breast Cancer Screening and other Health Behaviors among Latinas
Breast Cancer X-Ray

Course Objective

  • Explain why it is important to consider the heterogeneity of Latino groups in the United States
  • Describe some of the challenges inherent in the concept of acculturation
  • Describe the controversies regarding fatalism and cancer screening

Date: March 1, 2016

Reviewed June 30, 2020

Presenter:
Ana Abraido-Lanza, PhD
Associate Professor, Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


In this webinar, Dr. Ana Abriado-Lanza gives an overview of the break down of the Latino population living in the United States, linking these statistics to breast cancer screening disparities between Latinas and non-Hispanic whites. Through description of relevant evidence-based literature and her own research, Dr. Lanza identifies cultural and structural factors that impact screening rates and breast cancer morbidity and mortality. She concludes by specifying rich areas for future research in addressing Latino health disparities related to cancer screening, smoking, and physical activity.

Collaborating with Churches to Conduct Evidence-Based Health Promotion
Illustration of Church

Course Objective

  • Describe the factors of faith-based HIV prevention programs in churches that may make them more acceptable to African American women than HIV prevention programs conducted in more traditional public health venues.
  • Describe how a CDC-defined evidence based intervention can be used to create the curriculum of a faith-based HIV prevention program
  • Describe which key stakeholders should be involved when designing a faith-based HIV prevention program

Date: February 2, 2016

Reviewed June 30, 2020

Presenter:
Gina Wingood, ScD
Sid and Helaine Lerner Professor of Public Health Promotion
Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


In this presentation, Dr. Wingood provides an overview of her research in HIV prevention, especially the community impact of large-scale HIV prevention interventions. The webinar describes the HIV prevention programs and their national dissemination and adoption.

“School to Prison” to “School Again:” Preparing a New Workforce to Address Health Disparities
Handcuffs on Stack of Books

Course Objective

  • Describe what is needed to develop a public health concentration for any new program that focuses on the education and training of inmates
  • Describe how current ‘pipeline’ programs to increase the participation of underrepresented minority students can be adjusted to create a pipeline for students in prison
  • Describe how evaluation studies can assist in the creation of programs designed to alter the school-to-prison pipeline

Date: January 27, 2016

Reviewed June 30, 2020

Presenter:
Robert Fullilove, EdD
Professor of Sociomedical Sciences
Associate Dean, Community and Minority Affairs
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


Mass incarceration is one of the leading contributors of health disparities, with a disproportionately large percentage of African American and Latino men experiencing incarceration during their lifetime. Having ever served time makes finding a job, securing housing, and utilizing health care services significantly more difficult, if not impossible. While the United States prison system is meant to “rehabilitate” inmates, many who are released have no education, no job, and no home, and are forced to resort to criminal activities, leading to high recidivism rates. This webinar raises the importance of educational programs for inmates as an effective tool for improving outcomes after release and reducing recidivism. Dr. Fullilove discusses his experience with the Bard Prison Initiative and his vision for a public health prison education system that would educate and recruit inmates as community public health workers striving to improve health and reduce disparities within their own neighborhoods after their release.

Region 2 Public Health Training Center