Category: Financial Planning and Management

Primary Competency Area

Managing NYC death reporting from the epicenter of a pandemic: COVID-19 in Spring 2020

Course Objective

  • Describe the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS)
  • Describe the process and parties involved in registering a death.
  • Describe the operational, and other, factors that make timely, accurate registration of death possible

Date: October 5th, 2021

Presenter:
Gretchen Van Wye, PhD, MA
Assistant Commissioner & City Registrar
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH)
Bureau of Vital Statistics, Division of Epidemiology


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, Gretchen Van Wye, PhD, MA, discusses the challenges and importance of increased death reporting during the COVID-19 pandemic. She begins by recognizing death registration both as a fundamental right of persons, as well as instrumental to monitoring disease outbreaks. She highlights the contextual obstacles of the beginning of the pandemic, which was marked by initial denial and limited testing, but followed a geometric progression and the corresponding response needed. She then explains how death registration works in New York City, and shares the NYDOHMH’s plan to respond to its increased need, including staff, system, policy, and data changes.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Describe the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS)
  2. Describe the process and parties involved in registering a death.
  3. Describe the operational, and other, factors that make timely, accurate registration of death possible
Succession Planning and Workforce Development for Public Health Agencies

Course Objective

  • Define “succession planning” for public health agencies
  • Present the reasons for a succession planning process in public health agencies, even during challenging times
  • Explain the key elements of the succession planning process
  • Link the elements of change management to organizational succession planning
  • Clarify the critical success factors for succession planning in public health

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject Matter  Expert: 
Emil J. Sadloch
President, Sadloch Development Associates & Instructor for Rutgers University’s Executive and Professional Education, School of Public Health, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences


The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist.

This course describes how health departments can undertake succession planning and workforce development efforts, even during ‘VUCA’ (volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous) times, using a case study approach set in the fictitious Tycho County.

Recommended Pre-Requisites:

  1. Introduction to Change Management
  2. Change Management: How Leadership Can Support Staff During Crises

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define “succession planning” for public health agencies
  2. Present the reasons for a succession planning process in public health agencies, even during challenging times
  3. Explain the key elements of the succession planning process
  4. Link the elements of change management to organizational succession planning
  5. Clarify the critical success factors for succession planning in public health
Breaking Through Public Health Bureaucracy: tools and tips to successfully navigate internal administration and processes

Course Objective

  • Describe how the federal government appropriates funding to public health agencies and other entities
  • Describe the key challenges faced by health departments implementing federally funded programs
  • Identify 3 strategies to overcome challenges and enhance efficiency in program implementation

Date: April 6, 2021

Presenter:
Jennifer McKeever, MSW, MPH
Founder and Principal of WE Public Health, LLC

&

Rishika Desai, MPH
Senior Analyst at the Association of State and Territorial Health Official (ASTHO)


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Jennifer McKeever, MSW, MPH & Rishika Desai, MPH, discuss the complexities of public health bureaucracy and the best ways to navigate it. They start by talking about what these bureaucratic issues might look like, how the pandemic has impacted them and the type of problems they might create at different levels. Jennifer and Rishika go on to describe how the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) tried to assess this in their recent qualitative study and highlight some of the key findings and recommendations for overcoming administrative bottlenecks that slow down program implementation. Through a conversation with the audience on what difficulties they’ve experienced, our presenters try to determine the common root causes. Lastly, they share ways in which agencies have responded to these challenges, now and in the past, and guide us through the unique steps that research has helped identify as tools to solve at least some of the bureaucratic problems we face in public health.

Participants will learn  the following:

  1. Describe how the federal government appropriates funding to public health agencies and other entities
  2. Describe the key challenges faced by health departments implementing federally funded programs
  3. Identify 3 strategies to overcome challenges and enhance efficiency in program implementation
Succession Planning and Change: Growing and Developing Talent in Public Health

Course Objective

  • Define “succession planning” for public health agencies
  • Explain the rationale for succession planning in public health
  • Identify the key elements of the succession planning process
  • Describe the link between change management and organizational succession planning
  • Explain the critical success factors for succession planning in public health

Date: November 10, 2020

Presenter:
Emil J. Sadloch, MA
SADLOCH DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANTS


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Emil J. Sadloch, MA, highlights the importance of succession planning and why it is so relevant for public health today. While acknowledging the incredible contributions of public health officials during this pandemic, he underscores the aspects of leadership, change management and workforce resilience that enabled this. He goes on to discuss the necessary shift in focus needed to address the future of public health and how leaders can recover and adapt from times of crisis. Emil elaborates ways to strengthen the current workforce in preparation for new challenges, while simultaneously grooming the next generation for the same. He walks us through 10 important goals of succession planning and what the existing barriers look like. Lastly, he shows us how to create an effective succession planning system by walking us through crucial practices and providing us with important tips to develop future leaders.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define “succession planning” for public health agencies
  2. Explain the rationale for succession planning in public health
  3. Identify the key elements of the succession planning process
  4. Describe the link between change management and organizational succession planning
  5. Explain the critical success factors for succession planning in public health
Taking Intelligent Risks: Leading Change that Works

Course Objective

  • Understand the role and importance of change in the workplace
  • Describe and identify reasons why people are resistant to change
  • Learn how to implement beneficial strategies to effectively manage change in the workplace

Date: February 4th 2020

Presenter:
Dr. Paul Thurman
Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, participants will explore how to navigate change in the workplace with Dr. Paul Thurman, Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. The course describes the concept of change in a professional setting, what changes are needed to make healthcare companies agile and how to implement these changes in the workplace. The webinar also explores the barriers to intelligent change management, providing managers and leaders with actionable tips to overcome these barriers.

Participants will learn about the following three lessons about public health communication:

  1. Understand the role and importance of change in the workplace
  2. Describe and identify reasons why people are resistant to change
  3. Learn how to implement beneficial strategies to effectively manage change in the workplace
Strategic Skills Training Series: Introduction to Change Management

Course Objective

By the end of this module, you should know how to:

  • Assess how change impacts individuals and organizations
  • Analyze barriers to change in a community
  • Describe the role of leadership in managing change
  • Explain the importance of communicating about change in the right way

…and see how you can incorporate these concepts in your practice to address a major public health crisis.

The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. The modules in this series use the community health improvement planning process to introduce you to the basics of the following four strategic skills areas. The first set of modules have been developed at an introductory level; the next part of the series will build on these foundational modules.

To help you think about ways to leverage these skills in your journey as a Chief Health Strategist to address real world problems in your community, the modules will utilize a case study approach, set in the fictitious Tycho County.

Follow how the Tycho County Health Department could adopt a systems approach to inform its thinking and planning while developing a community health improvement plan focused on a familiar public health problem, opioid misuse.

In this module, you will learn how to describe how change impacts individuals and organizations.

Achieving Health Equity through Community Control of Budgets
Ten Dollar Bill and Coins

Course Objective

  • Name the characteristics of public engagement practices that offer community control to historically underrepresented and under-resourced communities
  • Describe how participatory budgeting has impacted health outcomes and social determinants of health in the US and internationally
  • Describe opportunities to integrate data-informed community engagement practices into the allocation of health-focused funds and/or budgets that influence the social determinants of health

Date: October 3, 2017

Presenter:
Jennifer Godzeno, MSUP, MPH, AICP
Deputy Director
Participatory Budgeting Project


Participatory budgeting involves community members in deciding what to do with a given budget. It is a powerful tool used globally to increase community engagement and shift from “indirect” to “direct” democracy. Its impacts include encouraging a more responsive government, giving voices to community members who otherwise may be ineligible to vote in standard elections, and has even been linked to a 30% reduction in under-5 mortality in communities in Brazil that adopted the practice. Jennifer Godenzo discusses how it applies to the “ladder of participation” by giving citizens control and is thus equitable, empowering, and focuses on the social determinants of health. She explains the five steps of participatory budgeting: design a process with the community, brainstorm ideas, develop proposals, cast a vote, and fund winning projects. She also gives examples of where participatory budgeting has been used, from high schools in Phoenix, AZ to citywide community garden projects in Vallejo, CA to within organizations, such as hospitals and foundations.

Region 2 Public Health Training Center