Category: Health Disparities, Health Equity, Social Determinants of Health

Primary Competency Area

Navigating the path to a culture of healing: How trauma-informed care provides a blueprint for the well-being of public health professionals and the communities they serve
Navigating the path to a culture of healing: How trauma-informed care provides a blueprint for the well-being of public health professionals and the communities they serve. Carina Schmid, RN, MPH Lecturer, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Trauma-Informed Coach Resonant healing practitioner Livestreaming: October 3rd, 2023, 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Understand the increasing and universal need for trauma-informed care and communication
  • Identify the linkage between trauma and adverse health outcomes
  • Articulate the underlying principles of trauma-informed care

Date: October 3, 2023

Presenter:
Carina Schmid, MPH
Lecturer, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
Trauma-informed coach and resonant healing practitioner


Ms. Schmid discusses how trauma-informed care provides a basis for public health professionals and the communities they serve. Trauma-informed care and communication have become increasingly crucial for public health professionals, driven by the substantial impact and prevalence of trauma within individuals, communities, and populations — including the professionals themselves. This webinar serves as an introduction to the realm of trauma-informed care, encompassing essential concepts, the intricate connection between trauma and adverse health outcomes, and the guiding principles of trauma-informed practice. Together, we get a taste of the journey that shifts our perspective from asking, “What is wrong with you?” (or me, or them) to understanding, “What happened to you?” (or me, or us).

The Swag Deficit: How and Why Public Health Sucks All The Fun Out of Everything
The Swag Deficit: How and Why Public Health Sucks All The Fun Out of Everything Jerel Ezell, PhD, MPH Director, Cornell Center for Cultural Humility Assistant Professor in General Medicine Weill Cornell Medicine Livestreaming: September 5th, 2023, at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Understand primary gaps and weaknesses in how public health presents itself and engages communities
  • Define and discuss “swag deficit” at a barbeque or cocktail party
  • Identify ways to develop a swag surplus or make your public health organization swag neutral

Date: September 5, 2023

Presenter:
Jerel Ezell, PhD MPH
Director of Cornell Center for Cultural Humility
Assistant Professor in General Medicine
Weill Cornell University


Jerel Ezell presents on the importance of “swag” and what that means in the context of public health departments working to build a stronger public presence. He begins by describing three primary factors that contribute to a “swag deficit”. Ezell goes on to discuss approaches for engaging with communities. He ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps.

Participants will be able to:

  • Understand primary gaps and weaknesses in how public health presents itself and engages communities
  • Define and discuss “swag deficit” at a barbeque or cocktail party 
  • Identify ways to develop a swag surplus or make your public health organization swag neutral
Climate Change: Using Technical and Adaptive Leadership to Identify and Address Extreme Heat
Thermometer

Course Objectives

  • Identify technical vs. adaptive challenges related to climate change
  • Assess, frame, and take action to address the climate change problem using data and evidence
  • Discuss the applicability of adaptive leadership to address the health impacts of climate change
  • Identify barriers to creating effective messages and media campaigns
  • Identify technical vs. adaptive challenges related to climate change

Date: July 1, 2023


Climate change can contribute to disruptions of physical, biological, and ecological systems, including disturbances originating locally and elsewhere. The health effects of these disruptions can be severe.

As climate change continues, some existing health threats will intensify and new health threats will emerge. Effective leadership in public health can take steps to lessen these impacts on the populace.

This self-paced module course will focus on how local health departments can take action to adapt to the health impacts of climate change such as rising temperatures, using principles of adaptive leadership.

Participants will learn to:

  1. Describe roles that local health departments can play to address the health impacts of climate change.
  2. Assess, frame, and take action to address the climate change problem using data and evidence.
  3. Define adaptive leadership and adaptive leadership behaviors.
  4. Discuss the applicability of adaptive leadership to address the health impacts of climate change.
  5. Identify technical vs. adaptive challenges related to climate change.
A Systems Approach to Reduce Gun Violence
Pistol

Course Objective

  • Discuss the public health approach to addressing gun violence
  • Discuss the applicability of systems thinking to address gun violence
  • Describe the roles that local public health agencies can play to address gun violence, including supporting gun safety

Date: July 1, 2023

Gun violence is a major public health issue causing significant death, injuries and years of life lost. Gun violence and gun safety are complex public health problems and challenges that can benefit from a systems-thinking approach. This self-paced module course will focus on how local health departments can take action to address gun violence in their communities. The course describes two examples of how different counties in the state are applying the public health approach to gun violence in their communities and using systems thinking to help define the problem and identify risk factors and areas to intervene.

Recruitment and Retention in Public Health

Course Objectives

  • List the six steps in the recruitment process
  • List tools you can use to prioritize the positions you need to fill
  • Describe how diversity, equity, and inclusion are part of each step of the recruitment and retention process
  • Explain the importance of a well-written job description, and how a description is different from a job posting or job advertisement
  • Describe the basics of recruitment marketing and employer branding
  • Identify at least three potential partners for developing recruitment partnerships
  • Explain how to improve communications with job candidates
  • List key elements of onboarding and retention

Date: July 1, 2023


In this self-paced module course, Dr. Heather Krasna, Associate Dean, Career Services and Professional Development at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, provides a crash course on recruitment and retention of new hires, from start to finish.

Confronting Barriers to Vaccine Acceptance: Create Effective Communication Using Behavioral Science

Course Objective

  • Describe vaccine hesitancy/vaccine confidence and why it is an important public health issue
  • Define behavioral science
  • Apply the Health Belief Model (HBM) to design vaccine messaging
  • Describe approaches to using behavioral science to combat misinformation about vaccines and build trust and confidence in vaccines and health care providers
  • Explain how these principles apply to current public health challenges that are described in case studies, including flu, COVID, and childhood vaccines

Date: June 30, 2023


This self-paced module course outlines how to confront barriers to vaccine acceptance by creating effective communication using behavioral science, health literacy, and techniques to combat misinformation. It provides an introduction to the key tools from each of those fields, then instructs on the five-step process of developing vaccine communications. It includes case studies to show how these principles have been applied in a real-world setting. This course is appropriate for anyone communicating about vaccination, from healthcare workers in one-on-one communications to public health promotion specialists developing full communication campaigns.

Commercial Determinants of Health

Course Objective

  • Define commercial determinants of health (CDOH) and discuss their relationship to other determinants of health frameworks such as the social determinants of health (SDOH)
  • Apply CDOH frameworks to the analysis of public health problems that public health professionals encounter in order to develop programs, policies, and services that contribute to minimizing the harms and maximizing the benefits of commercial influences on health
  • Assess marketing practices and corporate political activity of at least two major health-harming industries (e.g., tobacco, alcohol, food and beverage, pharmaceuticals, social media, fossil fuels, or others) and describe their impact on population health and health inequities
  • Identify key sources of evidence and data on the distribution, impact, and pathways by which commercial factors influence health that can inform creation of effective interventions
  • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of major strategies that advocacy groups and coalitions have used to reduce the harms of CDOH
  • Make the case for public health practices that address CDOH as fundamental determinants of health and health equity

Date: June 30, 2023


This course is designed to introduce public health practitioners and academics to the concept of commercial determinants of health (CDOH). It provides definitions and a framework for the study of CDOH. It also presents: 

  • How public health campaigns have modified CDOH to improve health and equity.    
  • Sources of data and evidence on CDOH  
  • Obstacles to taking on CDOH  
  • Role of public-private partnerships in tackling CDOH
Public Health’s “Equity Clout” Problem: What Is It And How Do We Address It To Achieve Structural and Cultural Humility?
Public Health's "Equity Clout" Problem: What Is It And How Do We Address It To Achieve Structural and Cultural Humility? Jerel Ezell, PhD, MPH Director, Cornell Center for Cultural Humility Assistant Professor in General Medicine Weill Cornell Medicine Livestreaming: June 6th, 2023, at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objectives

  • Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  • Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  • Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.

Date: June 04, 2023

Presenter:
Jerel Ezell, PhD, MPH
Director, Cornell Center for Cultural Humility
Assistant Professor in General Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine


Dr. Jerel Ezell presents on the importance of equity clout and what that means in the context of public health departments working to build structural and cultural humility. He begins by describing three primary factors that contribute to diminished equity clout. Ezell goes on to discuss approaches for bridging the equity clout gap. He ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  2. Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  3. Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.
Occupation and COVID-19 Mortality in New York City
Occupation and COVID-19 Mortality in New York City ‹ City Blanca Bernard-Davila, MPH, MS COVID-19 Data Coordinator and Analyst Bureau of Vital Statistics Division of Epidemiology New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Livestreaming: May 2nd, 2023, at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objectives

  • Examine the impact of COVID-19 on mortality across occupational groups in New York City
  • Describe mortality across occupational groups during the COVID-19 pandemic study
  • Describe the evidence demonstrating disproportionate mortality across occupational groups by age, race/ethnicity, and gender

Date: May 2, 2023

Presenter:
Blanca Bernard-Davila, MPH, MS
COVID-19 Data Coordinator and Analyst
Bureau of Vital Statistics
Division of Epidemiology
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Blanca Bernard-Davila, MPH, MS presents on the importance of occupation COVID-19 mortality in NYC. The presenter begins by examing the impact of COVID-19 mortality across different occupational groups in New York City and how it realtes to public health. She then describes the COVID-19 pandemic study period and the mortality across occupational groups. She goes on to discuss the evidence demonstrating mortality across occupaitonal groups by age, race and ethnicity, and gender and the public health relevance.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Examine the impact of COVID-19 on mortality across occupational groups in New York City.
  2. Describe mortality across occupational groups during the COVID-19 pandemic study period.
  3. Describe the evidence demonstrating disproportionate mortality across occupational groups by age, race/ethnicity, and gender.
Public Health Law in the 21st Century: Exploring Authority, Equity, and Advocacy
Public Health Law in the 21st Century: Exploring Authority, Equity, and Advocacy Montrece Ransom, JD, MPH, ACC Director National Coordinating Center for Public Health Training Dawn Hunter, JD, MPH Director Southwestern Regional Netowrk for Public Health Law Livestreaming: April 4th, 2023, at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objectives

  • Describe how law serves as a foundation for public health practice.
  • Provide examples of how law serves as a social determinant of health.
  • Identify efforts to limit or diminish public health authority and how these efforts impact public health outcomes.
  • Provide examples of how law can be used to advance health and racial equity.
  • Highlight activities under way to strengthen public health advocacy at the local, state, and national levels.

Date: April 4, 2023

Presenter:
Montrece Ransom, JD, MPH, ACC
Director, National Coordinating Center for Public Health Training 

Dawn Hunter, JD, MPH
Director, Southwestern Regional Network for Public Health Law


Montrece Ransom, JD, MPH and Dawn Hunter, JD, MPH present on public health law fundamentals. The presenters begin by explaining the basics of law in the United States and how it realtes to public health. They then discuss landmark supreme court cases and changes to public health authority since the COVID-19 pandemic. The presenters go on to discuss law as a tool for equity and racism as a public health crisis. Finally, the presenters explain how law can be used as a tool for public health practice.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe how law serves as a foundation for public health practice.
  • Provide examples of how law serves as a social determinant of health
  • Identify efforts to limit or diminish public health authority and how these efforts impact public health outcomes.
  • Provide examples of how law can be used to advance health and racial equity.
  • Highlight activities under way to strengthen public health advocacy at the local, state, and national levels.
Region 2 Public Health Training Center