Category: Leadership and Systems Thinking

Primary Competency Area

A Systems Approach to Understanding Childhood Obesity

Course Objective

By the end of this module, you should know how to:

  • Describe public health as part of a larger inter-related system of organizations that influence the health of populations at local, national, and global levels.
  • Describe different stakeholders with the power to address childhood obesity.
  • Explain how local health departments (LHDs) can use systems thinking approaches while planning intersectoral initiatives to reduce inequities in childhood obesity.

…and see how you can incorporate these concepts in your practice to address a major public health crisis.

This module developed by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center (PHTC) aims to explore how to use problem solving approaches inspired by systems thinking to reduce inequities in childhood obesity.* Systems thinking is a methodological approach that helps us better understand how complex systems operate, and how we can identify leverage points within systems to influence behavior. Since this is a foundational module, our goal is just to introduce how a systems thinking lens can be applied to a major public health issue.

In this module, you will learn how to identify the characteristics of a system in a public health context.

*To learn more about systems thinking, please enroll in the course ‘Introduction to Systems Thinking’, part of the Strategic Skills training series also offered by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center.

Strategic Skills Training Series: Introduction to Change Management

Course Objective

By the end of this module, you should know how to:

  • Assess how change impacts individuals and organizations
  • Analyze barriers to change in a community
  • Describe the role of leadership in managing change
  • Explain the importance of communicating about change in the right way

…and see how you can incorporate these concepts in your practice to address a major public health crisis.

The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. The modules in this series use the community health improvement planning process to introduce you to the basics of the following four strategic skills areas. The first set of modules have been developed at an introductory level; the next part of the series will build on these foundational modules.

To help you think about ways to leverage these skills in your journey as a Chief Health Strategist to address real world problems in your community, the modules will utilize a case study approach, set in the fictitious Tycho County.

Follow how the Tycho County Health Department could adopt a systems approach to inform its thinking and planning while developing a community health improvement plan focused on a familiar public health problem, opioid misuse.

In this module, you will learn how to describe how change impacts individuals and organizations.

Strategic Skills Training Series: Introduction to Systems Thinking

Course Objective

By the end of this module, you should know how to:

  • Consider events, patterns, and structures related to a complex problem
  • Explain what a complex adaptive system is
  • Explain how mental models impact the way we perceive a problem
  • List some key systems thinking habits to develop

…and see how you can incorporate these concepts in your practice to address a major public health crisis.

The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health practitioners to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. The modules in this series use the community health improvement planning process to introduce you to the basics of the following four strategic skills areas. This first set of modules have been developed at an introductory level; the next part of the series will build on these foundational modules.

To help you think about ways to leverage these skills in your journey as a Chief Health Strategist to address real world problems in your community, the modules will utilize a case study approach, set in the fictitious Tycho County.

Follow how the Tycho County Health Department could adopt a systems approach to inform its thinking and planning while developing a community health improvement plan focused on a familiar public health problem, opioid misuse.

In this module, you will learn how to identify the characteristics of a system in a public health context.

Change and Public Health: A Deeper Look into Leading Change Successfully

Course Objective

  • Identify key competencies for managing change in the role of the Chief Health Strategist and Public Health 3.0
  • Assess how change impacts individuals and organizations when addressing a major public health crisis
  • Describe how Kotter’s “8-Step Process for Leading Change” may help guide a successful organizational change initiative

Date: October 1, 2019

Presenter:
Emil J. Sadloch, MA
President, Sadloch Development Associates


In this Month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, participants learn about change management principles that public health professionals can utilize from Emil J. Sadloch, MA, President of SADLOCH DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES. Using a systems thinking approach to generate collaboration in Public Health 3.0, Emil provides an overview of how Chief Health Strategists can be change agents, who take the initiative in actualizing change. Emil highlights Kotter’s 8-Step Model for Leading Change as one of various frameworks for implementing change practices.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Identify key competencies for managing change in the role of the Chief Health Strategist and Public Health 3.0
  2. Assess how change impacts individuals and organizations when addressing a major public health crisis
  3. Describe how Kotter’s “8-Step Process for Leading Change” may help guide a successful organizational change initiative
Policy Engagement: An Essential Role for Public Health Agencies in Public Health 3.0

Course Objective

  • Describe the policy engagement process in public health
  • Identify approaches that public health agencies can use to inform policy development
  • Describe how the elements of the community health improvement process can be used to support effective policy engagement to achieve public health goals

Date: August 6, 2019

Presenter:
Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant


In this Month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, participants learn about various policy-focused approaches that public health agencies can utilize from Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS. The lecture takes a systems thinking approach and acknowledges that policy making is a rarely linear process with stages occurring simultaneously. From policy around motor vehicle related incident and fluoridation of drinking water through the transition to Public Health surveillance, this webinar walks participants through the evolution of policy engagement up to Public Health 3.0 and the role of the Chief Health Strategist. Focusing on partnerships and cross-cutting activities such as stakeholder engagement, collaboration and communication Slvia Pirani provides an overview of the policy engagement process.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Describe the policy engagement process in public health
  2. Identify approaches that public health agencies can use to inform policy development
  3. Describe how the elements of the community health improvement process can be used to support effective policy engagement to achieve public health goals
Systems Thinking for Public Health: An Introduction
Systems Thinking for Public Health An Introduction

Course Objective

  • Define a system
  • Explain why systems thinking is important for public health
  • Describe 3 tools for systems thinking

Date: May 7, 2019

Presenter:
Dr. Jacqueline Merrill, PhD, MPH, RN


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, participants learn from Dr. Jacqueline Merrill about the value of systems thinking in addressing major, complex public health challenges. The lecture provides an overview on public health’s emerging responsibility to engage multiple stakeholders and community partners in improving social determinants of health, as well as how systems thinking can facilitate the creation of context-specific solutions between them. Dr. Merrill introduces the major constructs and describes basic decision-making tools used in systems thinking. At the end of the lecture, Dr. Merrill illustrates in-depth examples in applying systems thinking techniques in public health.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Define a system
  2. Explain why systems thinking is important for public health
  3. Describe 3 tools for systems thinking
Change Management and You: How Change Impacts Public Health Professionals
Large Yellow Arrow

Course Objective

  • Name key competencies for managing change within public health
  • Identify and analyze situations where change affected initiatives in public health
  • Explain critical roles of the public health professional that serves as a “change agent”

Date: September 4, 2018

Presenter:
Emil J Sadloch, MA
President
Sadloch Development Associates


The Region 2 Public Health Training Center presents its monthly Log-in2Learn series. Starting September 2018, the series began its new focus on the de Beaumont Foundation Strategic Skill Areas, eight skills and knowledge areas needed to address complex public health problems. In this webinar, participants will learn from Mr. Emil J Sadloch about introductory concepts of change management, such as the definition of change management, types of change an organization might experience, and the cycle of change. Mr. Sadloch continues his presentation by give examples of how change agents can anticipate the effects of change with explanations of people’s personal change styles, signs of resistance, essential components of change management, and tools and key questions supervisors can use to manage change.

Crossing the Quality Chasm in Public Health
Illustration Showing Efficiency, Cost and Quality

Course Objective

  • Define the components of continuous quality improvement (CQI) and describe its applications.
  • Articulate the rationale for recent promotion of quality improvement frameworks in public health policy and practice.
  • Identify resources, including online training opportunities, to assist in the incorporation of CQI into your public health practice .

Date: December 21, 2016

Presenter:
Thomas I. Mackie
Assistant Professor, Department of Health Systems and Policy
Rutgers University School of Public Health


This presentation will provide an introduction to a continuous quality improvement framework, the rationale for promotion of quality improvement in policy and practice, and tools and resources to facilitate incorporation into your public health practice.

Public Health and Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Health Webinar Series, Part IV: Transformation of New York Mental Health System to A Medicaid Managed Care Model
Paper Cut Out

Course Objective

  • Describe the role of managed care and behavioral health integration for addressing the needs of individuals with mental health challenges.
  • Identify critical elements for health plan engagement with mental health services in Managed Care.
  • Explain Health and Recovery Plans (HARP Services) in Medicaid Managed Care and how community work force can work to integrate HARP Services into health care.

Date: September 22, 2016

Presenter:
Glenn Liebman
CEO
Mental Health Association in New York State, Inc.


In this webinar, Glenn Liebman of the Mental Health Association in New York State discusses the transformation of the New York State mental health system into a Medicaid managed care model. Mr. Liebman provides a historical context for the reform, describes the changes that will occur to funding streams as a result of the reform, and implications of these changes.

Climate Change, Extreme Weather, Natural Disaster & Human Health and Integrating Climate and Public Health Data into the Hazard Vulnerability Analysis Process
Damage from Natural Disaster

Course Objective

  • Discuss the research findings of the effects of extreme weather and natural disaster on human health
  • Identify population vulnerability to extreme weather events and climate change
  • Develop evidence-based interventions based on research findings
  • Following the second half of the webinar, participants will be able to:Describe how climate change is altering the way emergency preparedness is conducted
  • Explain how local health departments can incorporate climate change into Hazard Vulnerability Analysis process

Date: April 13, 2016

Presenter:
Shao Lin, MD, PhD, MPH
Professor, Research Director of Global Health Program
University of Albany, New York School of Public Health

Elena Grossman, MPH
BRACE-Illinois Project Manager
UIC School of Public Health


The first half of this webinar focuses on the specific health risks associated with extreme weather conditions. High temperatures and humidity increase hospital admission rates due to respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, renal disease, and total mortality; conversely, cold temperatures contribute to and increase in asthma and incidence of congenital cataracts. Vulnerabilities due to severe weather, based on post-Hurricane Sandy health evaluations, include but are not limited to mental health and substance abuse, kidney disease, and COPD. The webinar outlines the risks, vulnerabilities, and health burden associated with climate change, and offers next steps for addressing these issues in the future

The second half of the webinar focuses on preparation for the public health impacts of climate change. As a way to encourage emergency preparedness professionals to recognize the impact of climate change in, Grossman encourages requiring them to acknowledge the possibility for extreme and/or severe weather in their Hazard Vulnerability Analysis when applying for CDC grant money. She outlines four pieces necessary for success in doing so, which include: 1) historic weather data, 2) projected weather data, 3) health indicators data, and 4) social vulnerability index data.

Region 2 Public Health Training Center