Category: Learning Module

Format

Introduction to Qualitative Research
Group of People Conducting Research

Course Objective

  • Describe the rationale for using qualitative research to answer a particular question or to study a phenomenon of interest
  • Describe critical elements of each of the five main approaches to qualitative research
  • Describe the four main types of qualitative data collection methods including the main procedures and challenges associated with each
  • Select an appropriate data collection method(s) for a given study question or approach
  • Discuss commonly used strategies to ensure validity and reliability in qualitative research

Date: December 14, 2018

Presenter:
New York City-Long Island-Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center with revisions made by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center


Qualitative research is “an inquiry process of understanding whereby the researcher builds a complex, holistic picture, analyzes words, reports detailed views of informants, and conducts the study in a natural setting,” (Creswell 249). In ‘Introduction to Qualitative Research,’ learners follow along with two staff members from the Huntsville Department of Health as they discuss key concepts in qualitative research and decide how to examine an underutilized program using qualitative methods. Through interactive exercises and feedback, learners will explore the most common approaches to and data collection methods in qualitative research. The following discussion was based on John W. Creswell’s Qualitative Inquiry & Research Design, a text commonly used in qualitative research methods courses. Additional resources and suggested readings are provided for those who are interested in learning more about specific topics and concept introduced in this training.

Introduction to Qualitative Analysis with ATLAS.ti
Person Writing on Sticky Notes

Course Objective

  • Critically interpret the meaning of textual data using inductive reasoning
  • Develop a preliminary classification scheme using interpretative reading
  • Categorize inferences with meaningful conceptual labels and/or codes
  • Formulate conclusions based on relationships between established categories and/or codes
  • Perform basic qualitative analysis techniques in ATLAS.ti software, including:
    • Prepare primary documents for importing into ATLAS.ti’s Hermeneutic Unit
    • Generate output of coded textual data
    • Troubleshoot key importing, coding and output operations in ATLAS.ti

Date: December 14, 2018

Presenter:
New York City-Long Island-Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center with revisions made by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center


Qualitative research produces rich, narrative data that requires both analysis and interpretation. In this section, learners are guided through the basic steps of the analysis process: Organize, Reduce, and Describe. An interactive practice exercise accompanies each step. Following this discussion, ATLAS.ti is introduced as a computer assisted software package that can supplement and improve pen and paper coding processes. Users follow instructional videos to learn how to use ATLAS.ti to manage large bodies of textual, graphical, audio, and video data. It is recommended that users download a trial version of ATLAS.ti software to follow along with the instructional videos in Part III and to practice at home. Download a trial version of ATLAS.ti.

Introduction to Mixed Methods
Magnifying Glass on Green Paper Person

Course Objective

  • Compare the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative research.
  • Explain how mixed methods research design can take advantage of the strengths of both approaches.
  • Identify the five main types of mixed methods design and the goals of each type.
  • Match the appropriate type of mixed methods design with the aims of the research question.
  • Recognize the implications of mixed methods design on other aspects of the research design, including the sampling, measurement, and analysis.
  • Describe the main ways in which qualitative and quantitative data may be appropriately integrated during analysis.

Date: December 14, 2018

Presenter:
New York City-Long Island-Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center with revisions made by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center


The following course is designed to provide the learner with an introduction to the benefits of mixed methods, different mixed methods research designs, and methods of analyzing and integrating mixed methods data.

Facilitating Focus Groups
Focus Group

Course Objective

  • Identify focus group standards for planning and logistics.
  • Moderate a focus group utilizing listening, open-ended questioning, and probing techniques while encouraging active participation.
  • Manage the logistical execution of the focus group with attention to conversation flow, group participation, and time-keeping

Date: December 14, 2018

Presenter:
New York City-Long Island-Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center with revisions made by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center


In this video-based training program, participants sit in on a mock focus group and watch as the moderator models different techniques to carry out the focus group. The program addresses techniques including ice-breaker exercises, validation techniques, and other strategies to probe group members for clarity and deeper meaning, while encouraging group interactions and active conversation.

Building Logic Models
Illustrated Hands with Sticky Notes

Course Objective

  • Construct a public health program logic model based on given program information

Date: December 14, 2018

Presenter:
New York City-Long Island-Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center with revisions made by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center


In this training program, participants will build a logic model based on a scenarios related to improving access to healthy food in underserved neighborhoods. Participants will be asked to create a logic model based on components in the scenario and will be able to compare their logic model to an expert logic model.

Advanced Program Evaluation
Advanced Program Evaluation Graph

Course Objective

  • Appreciate that a comprehensive evaluation plan addresses a program logic, stakeholders, evaluation questions and evaluation design.
  • Assess advantages and limitations of evaluation designs, including randomized, quasi-experimental and pre-post designs.
  • Appraise and compare options for data collection methods, measures and sampling strategies.
  • Identify and address associated threats to validity.
  • Identify strategies for addressing budget, time, data and political constraints in evaluation practice.

Date: December 14, 2018

Presenter:
New York City-Long Island-Lower Tri-County Public Health Training Center with revisions made by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center


*This course is Certified Quality through the Public Health Learning Navigator, an initiative of the Public Health Learning Network (PHLN) and National Network of Public Health Institutes (NNPHI).

Learners will take on the role of a staff member at the Middleton County Health Department who is tasked with helping to develop an evaluation plan for an obesity-prevention program recently launched in Middleton County. Using the CDC Program Evaluation Framework, learners will connect each step of the framework with a section of the evaluation plan, going into detailed discussion about: incorporating stakeholders, logic models and evaluation questions in the process; characteristics of different research designs for evaluation and considerations for choosing an appropriate design; options for data collection methods and sampling; and thinking through threats to validity. Additionally, the learner will review strategies for conducting rigorous evaluations within constraints of budget, time, and resources.

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: State and Local Health Departments’ Role in Building Pathways to Higher Education
Group of Diverse Graduates

Course Objective

  • Explain the rationale for expanding public health practice to promote health and equity by supporting access to high-quality, affordable education
  • Summarize evidence documenting how high school and college completion can improve health
  • Describe structural, social, political, and economic barriers to high school and college completion
  • Identify three specific strategies designed to support high school completion, transition to higher education, and college completion to advance health equity
  • Explain how LHDs can leverage “upstream” strategies to support these initiatives, including partnering with other agencies, social movements and community organizations

Date: September 24, 2018

Presenter:
Nicholas Freudenberg
Distinguished Professor of Public Health
City University of New York School of Public Health

Emily Frazosa
Senior Researcher
City University of New York School of Public Health


The relationship between health and education is well documented. However, not everyone in the United States has the same access to high-quality education, which creates wide disparities in high school and college graduation rates and future life success. Additionally, people with more education live longer lives and have lower rates of chronic disease and less drug use, less smoking and better birth outcomes. Advancing health equity means we must work to make sure everyone in our communities has access to equitable, high-quality, affordable educational opportunities. In this module, participants will explore specifically on how high school and college completion influence health, and what prevents students from earning a degree. While high school and college each present some challenges that are different, you’ll see that many of them overlap. Also, learners will review barriers that keep students from academic success, and the public health tools we have to break down those barriers. Lastly, learners will look at real-world examples of how schools, governments and health departments are working to help all students succeed.

Collective Impact Part I: Common Agenda and Shared Measures
Hands Drawing on Chalkboard

Course Objective

  • Identify some ways a community organization could provide assists to a Collective Impact project.
  • Describe a key practice for the Continuous Communication condition.
  • List the elements of Backbone Support for a Collective Impact project.
  • Describe how technology-based tools can affect Collective Impact efforts.

Date: August 31, 2018

Presenter:
Bill Barberg
President
Insightformation, Inc.


This module is part two of a two-part introductory series to the Collective Impact framework. In this module, participants build upon the lessons of part one by learning about the last three conditions of the Collective Impact framework–mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication, and backbone support. Participants will explore best practices of each of these conditions in order to advance public health initiatives.

Collective Impact Part II: Mutually Reinforcing Activities, Continuous Communication, and Backbone Support
Hands Drawing Graph on Chalkboard

Course Objective

  • Identify some ways a community organization could provide assists to a Collective Impact project.
  • Describe a key practice for the Continuous Communication condition.
  • List the elements of Backbone Support for a Collective Impact project.
  • Describe how technology-based tools can affect Collective Impact efforts.

Date: August 31, 2018

Presenter:
Bill Barberg
President
Insightformation, Inc.


This module is part two of a two-part introductory series to the Collective Impact framework. In this module, participants build upon the lessons of part one by learning about the last three conditions of the Collective Impact framework – mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication, and backbone support. Participants will explore best practices of each of these conditions in order to advance public health initiatives.

Understanding Diabetes Numbers
Diabetes Test

Course Objective

  • Identify high and low blood glucose levels in relation to age
  • Understand the impact of rising or falling blood glucose values
  • Understand how the A1C reflects long term diabetes control
  • Understand ketone values and their impact
  • Know when to contact the provider for immediate diabetes management issues
  • Know when to contact 911 for diabetes related issues
  • Know when to contact the provider for overall management adjustments
  • What to send home in preparation for a visit to the endocrinologist

Date: August 29, 2018

Presenter:
Linda Moskin, MD, MPH & Anne Brennan, MS, RN, FNP
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH)


This self-paced module provides an overview of important metrics related to managing diabetes. In this training, participants will learn about blood glucose values, A1C testing, ketone testing, and diabetes management adjustments.

Region 2 Public Health Training Center