Category: Policy Engagement

Strategic Skill Area

Nicotine and Neighborhoods: Findings from a Policy Evaluation and Retailer Assessment Study in NYC
Nicotine and Neighborhoods: Findings from a Policy Evaluation and Retailer Assessment Study in NYC Daniel P. Giovenco, PhD, MPH Assistant Professor, Dept of Sociomedical Sciences Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health Livestreaming: March 5th, 2024 at 12-1 pm ET 2

Course Objective

  • Explain the relationship between nicotine product retail in communities, use behaviors, and inequities
  • Describe the early impacts of a policy initiative to reduce tobacco retailer density in NYC
  • Discuss the current landscape of product availability for newer classes of nicotine products across several US cities

Date: March 5, 2024

Presenters:
Daniel P. Giovenco, PhD, MPH
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Dr. Giovenco presented his findings from a study investigating the effectiveness of a policy to reduce the density of tobacco retailers in New York City. He began by explaining the issue of tobacco retailer density and its relation to communities and inequities. He went on to summarize the evaluation methods used to evaluate the policy’s effectiveness, utilizing GIS technology. He then summarized the findings of the study and changes in the number of tobacco retailers in various neighborhoods resulting from the impact of the new policy. As a bonus, Dr. Giovenco also shared preliminary findings of a new study investigating shifts in tobacco product availability in three major U.S. cities, as related to the retailer limiting policy. He concludes with a call for more research efforts to investigate variations in retail access, use behaviors, and tobacco product risks. 

A Systems Approach to Reduce Gun Violence
Pistol

Course Objective

  • Discuss the public health approach to addressing gun violence
  • Discuss the applicability of systems thinking to address gun violence
  • Describe the roles that local public health agencies can play to address gun violence, including supporting gun safety

Date: July 1, 2023

Gun violence is a major public health issue causing significant death, injuries and years of life lost. Gun violence and gun safety are complex public health problems and challenges that can benefit from a systems-thinking approach. This self-paced module course will focus on how local health departments can take action to address gun violence in their communities. The course describes two examples of how different counties in the state are applying the public health approach to gun violence in their communities and using systems thinking to help define the problem and identify risk factors and areas to intervene.

Public Health Law in the 21st Century: Exploring Authority, Equity, and Advocacy
Public Health Law in the 21st Century: Exploring Authority, Equity, and Advocacy Montrece Ransom, JD, MPH, ACC Director National Coordinating Center for Public Health Training Dawn Hunter, JD, MPH Director Southwestern Regional Netowrk for Public Health Law Livestreaming: April 4th, 2023, at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objectives

  • Describe how law serves as a foundation for public health practice.
  • Provide examples of how law serves as a social determinant of health.
  • Identify efforts to limit or diminish public health authority and how these efforts impact public health outcomes.
  • Provide examples of how law can be used to advance health and racial equity.
  • Highlight activities under way to strengthen public health advocacy at the local, state, and national levels.

Date: April 4, 2023

Presenter:
Montrece Ransom, JD, MPH, ACC
Director, National Coordinating Center for Public Health Training 

Dawn Hunter, JD, MPH
Director, Southwestern Regional Network for Public Health Law


Montrece Ransom, JD, MPH and Dawn Hunter, JD, MPH present on public health law fundamentals. The presenters begin by explaining the basics of law in the United States and how it realtes to public health. They then discuss landmark supreme court cases and changes to public health authority since the COVID-19 pandemic. The presenters go on to discuss law as a tool for equity and racism as a public health crisis. Finally, the presenters explain how law can be used as a tool for public health practice.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe how law serves as a foundation for public health practice.
  • Provide examples of how law serves as a social determinant of health
  • Identify efforts to limit or diminish public health authority and how these efforts impact public health outcomes.
  • Provide examples of how law can be used to advance health and racial equity.
  • Highlight activities under way to strengthen public health advocacy at the local, state, and national levels.
Adaptive Leadership: Strategies for Public Health
Adaptive Leadership: Strategies for Public Health Emil J. Sadloch, BA, MA SADLOCH DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES Livestreaming: December 6th, 2022 at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • List highlights of the leadership approach known as “Adaptive Leadership”
  • Describe situational challenges as technical or adaptive
  • Identify the three phases of the “Adaptive Leadership” process
  • Apply the “Adaptive Leadership” behaviors to situations facing public health professionals

Date: December 6th, 2022

Presenter:
Emil J. Sadloch
SADLOCH DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Emil Sadloch presents on the leadership approach known as “Adaptive Leadership.” He begins by defining “Adaptative Leadership” and explaining the difference between technical and adaptive situational challenges. He goes on to describe the three phases of the “Adaptive Leadership” model: Observe, Interpret, and Intervene. Sadloch ends by presenting a case study and explaining how “Adaptive Leadership” can be applied to a current public health issue.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List highlights of the leadership approach known as “Adaptive Leadership”
  2. Describe situational challenges as technical or adaptive
  3. Identify the three phases of the “Adaptive Leadership” process 
  4. Apply the “Adaptive Leadership” behaviors to situations facing public health professionals 
Policy Enactment and Implementation in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In
Opioid Rescue Kit next to a Defibrillator

Course Objective

  • Describe the steps and strategies needed to enact and implement a policy, program or service
  • Identify the kinds of individuals and organizations who can contribute to the enactment and implementation of policies, programs, and services
  • Explain the importance of monitoring the implementation of policies, programs, and services
  • Understand how applying habits of systems thinking can improve the enactment and implementation processes

Date: June 30th, 2022

Subject Matter Experts:
Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant
&
Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH (Public Health), MBA,
Assistant Professor at Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health,
Associate Director of the Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program (AMDD) at Columbia University


The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. Using a scenario focused on the opioid problem in the fictitious ‘Tycho County’, this course will describe how the ‘Policy Enactment and Policy Implementation’ stages of the CDC policy process can be implemented by a health department using systems thinking tools and approaches.

Learners will be able to:

  1. Describe the steps and strategies needed to enact and implement a policy, program or service
  2. Identify the kinds of individuals and organizations who can contribute to the enactment and implementation of policies, programs, and services
  3. Explain the importance of monitoring the implementation of policies, programs, and services
  4. Understand how applying habits of systems thinking can improve the enactment and implementation processes
Improving Well-Being of Low Wage Food Workers: What Role for State and Local Governments?
Person cutting a grapefruit

Course Objective

  • Identify key threats to the well-being of low-wage food workers
  • Describe the role of policy and programs related to low-wage workers across sectors in reducing or increasing health and other inequities
  • Describe current responsibilities of state and local health departments and other public agencies in protecting the well-being of food workers
  • Identify at least three examples of policy or program initiatives that state and local health departments can undertake to improve the well-being and life chances of low-wage food workers
  • Describe one specific action your agency can take in the coming year to better protect the health of low-wage food workers

Date: June 30th, 2022

Subject Matter Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor of Public Health, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy
Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emilia Vignola,
PhD candidate, CUNY School of Public Health

Luis Saavedra,
Research Associate, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute


Ensuring and maintaining our nation’s food supply is the responsibility of approximately 19.7 million workers. The U.S. food system – including production, processing, distribution, retail, and service – relies on these workers to ensure the dietary needs of every American. Despite their critical role in our society, food workers are paid some of the lowest wages in the entire workforce, have limited access to benefits, and have high rates of occupational morbidity and mortality. As public health professionals, promoting the health and well-being of low-wage food workers is part of our responsibility to meet key public health goals, including protecting food safety, reducing food insecurity and hunger, preventing occupational illnesses and injuries, and reducing the income inequality that is the fundamental driver of health inequities. In essence, threats to low-wage food workers are threats to us all.

Learners will be able to:

  1. Identify key threats to the well-being of low-wage food workers
  2. Describe the role of policy and programs related to low-wage workers across sectors in reducing or increasing health and other inequities
  3. Describe current responsibilities of state and local health departments and other public agencies in protecting the well-being of food workers
  4. Identify at least three examples of policy or program initiatives that state and local health departments can undertake to improve the well-being and life chances of low-wage food workers
  5. Describe one specific action your agency can take in the coming year to better protect the health of low-wage food workers
Confronting Barriers to Vaccine Acceptance: The Role of Effective Communication
Nurse putting bandaid over vaccine shot.

Course Objective

  • Discuss root causes of vaccine hesitancy and inequities among different groups
  • Describe the role of effective communication in promoting vaccine acceptance
  • Identify promising equity- and community-driven strategies to address barriers to vaccine acceptance during COVID-19 and beyond
  • Discuss examples, case studies, and action steps to strengthen local communication systems and promote vaccine acceptance

Date: April 5th, 2022

Subject Matter Expert:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL
Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
Founder and Board President, Health Equity Initiative
Principal, Strategies for Equity and Communication Impact (SECI) 


This course developed by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center (PHTC) focuses on the role of effective communication in confronting barriers to vaccine acceptance. It discusses root causes of vaccine hesitancy and inequities among different groups and describes the role of effective communication in addressing such root causes, including a focus on equity- and community-driven strategies during COVID-19 and beyond. It also provides an overview of examples, case studies, best practices, and action steps to strengthen local communication systems and promote vaccine acceptance among a variety of groups.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Discuss root causes of vaccine hesitancy and inequities among different groups
  2. Describe the role of effective communication in promoting vaccine acceptance
  3. Identify promising equity- and community-driven strategies to address barriers to vaccine acceptance during COVID-19 and beyond
  4. Discuss examples, case studies, and action steps to strengthen local communication systems and promote vaccine acceptance
Policy Analysis in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In
People typing on computers

Course Objective

  • Define Stage Two of the CDC policy process i.e. Policy Analysis
  • List types of evidence that can be reviewed as part of the policy analysis phase
  • Assess feasibility of available policy options via framing questions and rubrics
  • Identify and define key variables in a complex public health issue
  • Sketch and interpret a simple systems map/ causal loop diagram
  • Define and identify leverage points in a system and assess their potential impact on the system
  • Discuss the importance of systems modeling and explore how systems models can be used to ask and answer policy-relevant questions

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject Matter Experts:  
Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH (Public Health), MBA
Assistant Professor at Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, and Associate Director of the Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program (AMDD) at Columbia University

&

Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant


The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist.

Using a scenario focused on the opioid problem in the fictitious ‘Tycho County’, this course will describe how the ‘Policy Analysis’ stage of the CDC policy process can be implemented by a health department using systems thinking tools and approaches.

Recommended Pre-Requisites:

  1. An Overview of the Policy Process in Public Health and the Need for Systems Thinking
  2. Problem Identification in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define Stage Two of the CDC policy process i.e. Policy Analysis
  2. List types of evidence that can be reviewed as part of the policy analysis phase
  3. Assess feasibility of available policy options via framing questions and rubrics
  4. Identify and define key variables in a complex public health issue
  5. Sketch and interpret a simple systems map/ causal loop diagram
  6. Define and identify leverage points in a system and assess their potential impact on the system
  7. Discuss the importance of systems modeling and explore how systems models can be used to ask and answer policy-relevant questions
Strategy and Policy Development in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In
Conference room meeting

Course Objective

  • Define Stage Three of the CDC policy process i.e. Strategy and Policy Development
  • Describe the steps that Health Departments can follow to develop an enactment strategy and draft an actual policy
  • Understand how systems thinking tools can help strengthen the strategy and policy development process

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject Matter Experts: 
Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant

&

Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH (Public Health), MBA
Assistant Professor at Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, and Associate Director of the Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program (AMDD) at Columbia University


The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist.

 

Using a scenario focused on the opioid problem in the fictitious ‘Tycho County’, this course will describe how the ‘Strategy and Policy Development’ stage of the CDC policy process can be implemented by a health department using systems thinking tools and approaches.

 

Recommended Pre-Requisites:

  1. An Overview of the Policy Process in Public Health and the Need for Systems Thinking
  2. Problem Identification in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In
  3. Policy Analysis in the Policy Process and How Systems Thinking Fits In

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define Stage Three of the CDC policy process i.e. Strategy and Policy Development
  2. Describe the steps that Health Departments can follow to develop an enactment strategy and draft an actual policy
  3. Understand how systems thinking tools can help strengthen the strategy and policy development process
Policy Making and Systems Thinking: tools to help the public health workforce address challenging times
Policy Making and Systems Thinking: tools to help the public health workforce address challenging times Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH, MBA Assistant Professor Population and Family Health Columbia University Medical Center Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS Public Health Practice Consultant Livestreaming January 12th 2021 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Define policy making in public health and how it can be used to achieve public health goals
  • Identify how systems thinking can strengthen public health policy development
  • Discuss how some of the essential steps in policy making and systems thinking can help address “wicked” public health challenges

Date: January  12th, 2021

Presenter:
Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant

Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH, MBA
Assistant Professor
Population and Family Health
Columbia University Medical Center


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH, MBA, and Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS, walk us through the process of policy making and the role of systems thinking in combating complex challenges. Sylvia starts by highlighting the steps required to craft good policy and emphasizes the importance of incorporating community members and stakeholders in the process. She then identifies some of the common obstacles seen during this process and shares instances of the same. Helen goes on to unpack the concept of systems thinking, explaining how it can be used and why it is such an essential tool for policy makers and the public health workforce. She demonstrates the ways in which systems thinking can be used to address complex situations and tricky relationships in the policy making process through a series of examples. Finally, they both identify the next steps in policy making and share useful resources for policy identification and systems thinking during challenging times.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define policy making in public health and how it can be used to achieve public health goals
  2. Identify how systems thinking can strengthen public health policy development
  3. Discuss how some of the essential steps in policy making and systems thinking can help address “wicked” public health challenges
Region 2 Public Health Training Center