Category: Program Planning and Policy Development

Primary Competency Area

School of Hard Knocks: The Impact of the Pandemic on School Children and Their Families

Course Objective

  • Identify forces currently at play which are impacting child well-being
  • Explain how workforce pressures factor into access to mental health services
  • Describe what can be done to help support schools, children, and families

Date: December 7th, 2021

Presenter:
Donna M. Bradbury & Bonnie Catlin
NYS Office of Mental Health
Office of Prevention & Health Initiatives


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, Donna M. Bradbury, MA, LMHC, and Bonnie Catlin, LCSW, discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted school-aged children, their families, and how the NYS Office of Mental Health (OMH) has mounted a response. They begin by providing epidemiological context to the current mental health crisis, including risk factors and changes in prevalence, as well as the OMH’s response to address the disportionate impact on underserved populations. They summarize the strengths and limitations of OMH’s shift to telehealth, such as barriers to access, caregiver involvement, provider responsiveness, and privacy concerns. With new federal resources to expand access, they go over response efforts, such as Project Hope and a 56% increase in number of OMH clinic satellites, as well as prevention programs, such as Healthy Steps, Project TEACH, the NYS trauma-informed network, and restorative practices. They wrap up by presenting the systems of care framework and answering questions from webinar attendees.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify forces currently at play which are impacting child well-being
  2. Explain how workforce pressures factor into access to mental health services
  3. Describe what can be done to help support schools, children, and families
Open Season on Ticks

Course Objective

  • List different tick species and what diseases they may transmit
  • Describe methods to reduce tick bites and identify symptoms of tick-borne disease
  • Identify ways to engage partners to help raise awareness and prevent tick-borne diseases in your community

Date: November 9th 2021

Presenter:
Faith Lustik
Public Health Planner

&

Lisa Lagos
Public Health Educator

Jefferson County Public Health Service


In this month’s Log-In2Learn webinar, Lisa Lagos and Faith Lustik from the Jefferson County Public Health Service introduce the management of tick-borne disease from the perspectives of community education and planning. Lisa begins by reviewing the history of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease, from its initial community identification to its known geographic and seasonal distribution today. She described tick-bite identification, Lyme disease symptoms and incubation period. She then introduces other tick-borne diseases, including anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis, Babesiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Powassan virus disease. Individual techniques of protection are reviewed. Faith wraps up the presentation by focusing on stakeholder engagement. She explains how to use surveillance data to alert providers, and explains the importance of including students, outdoor workers and trail users in outreach.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List different tick species and what diseases they may transmit
  2. Describe methods to reduce tick bites and identify symptoms of tick-borne disease
  3. Identify ways to engage partners to help raise awareness and prevent tick-borne diseases in your community
Reducing Promotion and Consumption of Ultra-Processed Food

Course Objective

  • Define and explain the impact of ultra-processed food on human and planetary health
  • List factors that contribute to the ubiquity of ultra-processed foods
  • Describe how health professionals can raise public awareness of the harms of ultra-processed food via media literacy and social marketing
  • Identify at least two policy interventions to address misleading product packaging and unhealthy product formulations
  • Describe how taxation and regulation approaches can be used to combat ultra-processed food
  • Describe strategies to promote and subsidize healthy food and beverages, including tap water

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject Matter Experts: 
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor of Public Health, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy & Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Craig Willingham, MPH
Deputy Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Erinn C. Bacchus, MPH
Doctoral Student, Community Health and Health Policy
Graduate Student Assistant, Healthy CUNY

Jessica Walsh, MPH
Assistant, CUNY School of Public Health


This two-part course developed by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center (PHTC) aims to understand ultra-processed food and explore how health departments can combat the promotion of ultra-processed food.

In Part I, we will develop a better understanding of ultra-processed food, and how it promotes negative health outcomes particularly for some populations.

In Part II, we will explore how health departments can combat the promotion of ultra-processed food.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define and explain the impact of ultra-processed food on human and planetary health
  2. List factors that contribute to the ubiquity of ultra-processed foods
  3. Describe how health professionals can raise public awareness of the harms of ultra-processed food via media literacy and social marketing
  4. Identify at least two policy interventions to address misleading product packaging and unhealthy product formulations
  5. Describe how taxation and regulation approaches can be used to combat ultra-processed food
  6. Describe strategies to promote and subsidize healthy food and beverages, including tap water
Community Engagement: The People’s Approach to Improving Health and Social Outcomes

Course Objective

  • Define community engagement
  • Discuss why community engagement is critical in advancing health and social equity
  • Describe the role of local health departments (LHDs) in engaging local communities and their leaders in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health interventions and policies
  • List best practices, strategies, and participatory processes for community dialogue and engagement
  • Discuss ways to integrate community engagement in public health practice

Date: June 30th 2021

Subject  Matter Expert: 
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL
Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University; Founder and Board President, Health Equity Initiative; Principal, Strategies for Equity and Communication Impact (SECI)


This course developed by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center (PHTC) focuses on community engagement, and the role of local health departments in engaging local communities. It focuses on strategies for “true” community engagement, which is about collaborating with and empowering local communities, and recognizing the expert in every community member and every leader representing the community. It also provides an overview of case studies, best practices and strategies for community dialogue and engagement and/or integrating community engagement in public health practice.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define community engagement
  2. Discuss why community engagement is critical in advancing health and social equity
  3. Describe the role of local health departments (LHDs) in engaging local communities and their leaders in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health interventions and policies
  4. List best practices, strategies, and participatory processes for community dialogue and engagement
  5. Discuss ways to integrate community engagement in public health practice
State changes to alcohol availability during COVID-19: What can state/local public health departments do to protect communities’ health?

Course Objective

  • Describe trends in alcohol use and related harms over the last two decades.
  • Explain state level changes to alcohol availability during the pandemic.
  • Summarize state and local public health strategies to curtail industry sponsored efforts to increase in alcohol availability to protect population level harms.

Date: May 4th 2021

Presenter:
Sean J. Haley, PhD, MPH
Asst. Professor of Health Policy and Management
City University of New York’s Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, Sean J. Haley, PhD, MPH, addresses the alarming increase in alcohol availability and consumption over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. He starts by providing context to the state of Alcohol Use Disorders amongst the U.S. population over the years. In detail, he then discusses the changes in attitudes and behaviors towards alcohol as the pandemic began to worsen and stay-at-home orders were placed. He highlights the unique characteristics of this increased consumption, identifying individual, social and structural factors. Dr. Haley makes sure to emphasize that this is not a temporary problem and substantiates his statement with research from past disasters, decade long trends and industry motivations. He then switches to what can be done to control this problem. He walks us through the many action steps, at varying levels, that can be taken by state and local public health departments in order to protect communities’ health.

Participants will learn the following:

  1. Describe trends in alcohol use and related harms over the last two decades.
  2. Explain state level changes to alcohol availability during the pandemic.
  3. Summarize state and local public health strategies to curtail industry sponsored efforts to increase in alcohol availability to protect population level harms.
Breaking Through Public Health Bureaucracy: tools and tips to successfully navigate internal administration and processes

Course Objective

  • Describe how the federal government appropriates funding to public health agencies and other entities
  • Describe the key challenges faced by health departments implementing federally funded programs
  • Identify 3 strategies to overcome challenges and enhance efficiency in program implementation

Date: April 6, 2021

Presenter:
Jennifer McKeever, MSW, MPH
Founder and Principal of WE Public Health, LLC

&

Rishika Desai, MPH
Senior Analyst at the Association of State and Territorial Health Official (ASTHO)


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Jennifer McKeever, MSW, MPH & Rishika Desai, MPH, discuss the complexities of public health bureaucracy and the best ways to navigate it. They start by talking about what these bureaucratic issues might look like, how the pandemic has impacted them and the type of problems they might create at different levels. Jennifer and Rishika go on to describe how the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) tried to assess this in their recent qualitative study and highlight some of the key findings and recommendations for overcoming administrative bottlenecks that slow down program implementation. Through a conversation with the audience on what difficulties they’ve experienced, our presenters try to determine the common root causes. Lastly, they share ways in which agencies have responded to these challenges, now and in the past, and guide us through the unique steps that research has helped identify as tools to solve at least some of the bureaucratic problems we face in public health.

Participants will learn  the following:

  1. Describe how the federal government appropriates funding to public health agencies and other entities
  2. Describe the key challenges faced by health departments implementing federally funded programs
  3. Identify 3 strategies to overcome challenges and enhance efficiency in program implementation
Reducing Obesity and Diet-Related Diseases by Limiting Predatory Marketing of Unhealthy Food

Course Objective

Learning Objectives for Part I: Understanding Predatory Marketing

  • Define targeted and predatory marketing.
  • Distinguish between different types of predatory marketing, with examples.
  • Describe digital media avenues used for predatory marketing.
  • Explain how targeted marketing of unhealthy food leads to negative health outcomes, particularly for certain populations.

Learning Objectives for Part II: What Health Departments Can Do to Combat Predatory Marketing

  • Describe ways to increase awareness of predatory marketing in communities.
  • Describe how local, state and federal governments can regulate predatory marketing.
  • List at least 2 actionable strategies for communities to decrease predatory marketing practices.
  • List 3 policy measures that could be taken to limit predatory marketing of unhealthy food at the city/local, state OR national level.

Launch Date: June 30th, 2020

Presenter:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor of Public Health, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy
Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute


Unhealthy food is the leading cause of premature death and preventable illness around the world today. Predatory marketing makes a significant contribution to this burden. Public health professionals can play an important role in reducing the prevalence and exposure to predatory marketing. This two-part training module develops an understanding of the current landscape of predatory marketing of unhealthy food and beverages, and how it promotes negative health outcomes particularly for vulnerable populations. This program will define the role of health departments in addressing predatory marketing, outline ways health departments can help document predatory marketing in their communities, and provide recommendations and examples of policy engagement activities public health professionals can get involved in.

Learning Objectives for Part I: Understanding Predatory Marketing

  • Define targeted and predatory marketing.
  • Distinguish between different types of predatory marketing, with examples.
  • Describe digital media avenues used for predatory marketing.
  • Explain how targeted marketing of unhealthy food leads to negative health outcomes, particularly for certain populations.

Learning Objectives for Part II: What Health Departments Can Do to Combat Predatory Marketing

  • Describe ways to increase awareness of predatory marketing in communities.
  • Describe how local, state and federal governments can regulate predatory marketing.
  • List at least 2 actionable strategies for communities to decrease predatory marketing practices.
  • List 3 policy measures that could be taken to limit predatory marketing of unhealthy food at the city/local, state OR national level.
An Overview of the Policy Process in Public Health and the Need for Systems Thinking

Course Objective

  • Explain the role of policy engagement in public health
  • Describe how policy is understood in a Public Health 3.0 context
  • Define the role of a public health agency in policy making
  • List ways that systems thinking concepts and tools can strengthen the policy process

Launch Date: June 30th, 2020

Presenter:
Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant


Engaging in policy making is an essential activity of public health agencies and staff to achieve the goals of Public Health 3.0 and to work collaboratively to address the social determinants of health. This training provides an overview of the policy making process as defined by the Centers for Disease Control, draws on the COVID-19 and other complex public health problems to discuss the challenges commonly faced by public health agencies during this policy process, and makes the case for using a systems thinking approach to overcome these policy roadblocks and address unintended consequences.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Explain the role of policy engagement in public health
  2. Describe how policy is understood in a Public Health 3.0 context
  3. Define the role of a public health agency in policy making
  4. List ways that systems thinking concepts and tools can strengthen the policy process
Building BRIDGES to Communicate with Multi-Sector Partners

Course Objective

  • Describe the process of identifying others’ positions including values, actions, and resources
  • Explain how differing definitions of key issues and problems can create misunderstanding
  • Identify systems and structures that support collaboration

Date: September 10, 2019

Presenter:
Dr. Anne Marie Liebel, EdD.
President
Health Comunication Partners LLC.


This month’s Log-in2Learn is the second in a three-part series designed to help you convey public health messages that resonate with audiences outside of public health. Using the approach of building BRIDGES, Dr. Anne Marie Liebel concentrates on communication strategies to use with potential collaborative partners.

It is well known that multi-sectoral partnerships are key to addressing some of society’s most deep-seated problems, and that multiple perspectives are beneficial in seeking to affect meaningful and sustainable change. It is essential in such collaborative efforts to be able to build on commonalities, and communicate across differences, recognizing various stakeholders’ goals, assumptions, and approaches.

Drawing on policy sociology and inquiry-as-stance, this webinar explores communication to and from policy-makers, the media, and other potential partners. You’ll have the opportunity to explore the main challenges in successful cross-sector communication. You’ll examine how communicating with multi sector partners contrasts with communicating with a public health audience. And you’ll learn the steps for building bridges to potential collaborators.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Describe the process of identifying others’ positions including values, actions, and resources
  2. Explain how differing definitions of key issues and problems can create misunderstanding
  3. Identify systems and structures that support collaboration
Policy Engagement: An Essential Role for Public Health Agencies in Public Health 3.0

Course Objective

  • Describe the policy engagement process in public health
  • Identify approaches that public health agencies can use to inform policy development
  • Describe how the elements of the community health improvement process can be used to support effective policy engagement to achieve public health goals

Date: August 6, 2019

Presenter:
Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant


In this Month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, participants learn about various policy-focused approaches that public health agencies can utilize from Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS. The lecture takes a systems thinking approach and acknowledges that policy making is a rarely linear process with stages occurring simultaneously. From policy around motor vehicle related incident and fluoridation of drinking water through the transition to Public Health surveillance, this webinar walks participants through the evolution of policy engagement up to Public Health 3.0 and the role of the Chief Health Strategist. Focusing on partnerships and cross-cutting activities such as stakeholder engagement, collaboration and communication Slvia Pirani provides an overview of the policy engagement process.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Describe the policy engagement process in public health
  2. Identify approaches that public health agencies can use to inform policy development
  3. Describe how the elements of the community health improvement process can be used to support effective policy engagement to achieve public health goals
Region 2 Public Health Training Center