Category: Program Planning and Policy Development

Primary Competency Area

Collective Impact Part I: Common Agenda and Shared Measures
Hands Drawing on Chalkboard

Course Objective

  • Identify some ways a community organization could provide assists to a Collective Impact project.
  • Describe a key practice for the Continuous Communication condition.
  • List the elements of Backbone Support for a Collective Impact project.
  • Describe how technology-based tools can affect Collective Impact efforts.

Date: August 31, 2018

Presenter:
Bill Barberg
President
Insightformation, Inc.


This module is part two of a two-part introductory series to the Collective Impact framework. In this module, participants build upon the lessons of part one by learning about the last three conditions of the Collective Impact framework–mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication, and backbone support. Participants will explore best practices of each of these conditions in order to advance public health initiatives.

Collective Impact Part II: Mutually Reinforcing Activities, Continuous Communication, and Backbone Support
Hands Drawing Graph on Chalkboard

Course Objective

  • Identify some ways a community organization could provide assists to a Collective Impact project.
  • Describe a key practice for the Continuous Communication condition.
  • List the elements of Backbone Support for a Collective Impact project.
  • Describe how technology-based tools can affect Collective Impact efforts.

Date: August 31, 2018

Presenter:
Bill Barberg
President
Insightformation, Inc.


This module is part two of a two-part introductory series to the Collective Impact framework. In this module, participants build upon the lessons of part one by learning about the last three conditions of the Collective Impact framework – mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication, and backbone support. Participants will explore best practices of each of these conditions in order to advance public health initiatives.

Data-Based Decision-Making Using Data to Intervene for Maternal and Child Health – Part Two in a Series
Woman Staring at 3D Pie Graph on White Board

Course Objective

  • Identify sources of evidence-based interventions/promising practices.
  • Define and develop SMART objectives, for outcome evaluation.
  • Use progress and outcome measures in program monitoring and evaluation.

Date: April 10, 2018

Presenter:
Michael Medvesky
Director
Public Health Information Group, New York State Department of Health


The purpose of this training is to inform public health professionals how to use data to shape needs assessments, develop public health programs, and provide a framework for program evaluation. In Part Two of this series, learners will take advantage of readily available data sources to explore interventions and programs to address public health issues in maternal and child health using Columbia County, NY as a case study.

Data-Based Decision-Making Using Data to Intervene for Maternal and Child Health – Part One in a Series
Woman Staring at 3D Pie Graph on White Board

Course Objective

  • Identify and locate sources of Maternal and Child Health data in New York State, at state, county, and sub-county levels.
  • Use descriptive epidemiology (person, place, and time) in needs assessment and program targeting.
  • Use data to identify high-risk populations in population for program targeting

Date: April 10, 2018

Presenter:
Michael Medvesky
Director
Public Health Information Group, New York State Department of Health


The purpose of this training is to inform public health professionals how to use data to shape needs assessments, develop public health programs, and provide a framework for program evaluation. In Part One of this series, learners will take advantage of readily available data sources to begin planning and implementing a successful health program related to issues in maternal and child health using Columbia County, NY as a case study.

Lead in Drinking Water: Preventing Exposure to Children in the Post-Flint Era
Faucet with Brown Water

Course Objective

  • Recognize past crises where lead has impacted the safety of drinking water in the United States
  • Identify exposure-prevention measures that can be applied in institutions such as schools, childcare centers and summer camps

Date: November 2, 2017

Presenter:
Howard N. Apsan, Ph.D.
University Director
Environmental, Health, Safety, and Risk Management, City University of New York


This webinar will provide background on the Flint, Michigan water crisis and other cases of impacted drinking water. It will also review the preventive efforts in place in New York and explore the initiatives being implemented to ensure that preschool and K-12 students are protected. Finally, it will provide guidance on how institutions serving children—public schools, child care centers, camps, after school programs and others—can prevent exposure of these vulnerable populations to elevated lead levels.

The Opiate Epidemic and the Medical Industrial Complex
White Pills Fallen Outside of Pill Bottle

Course Objective

  • Describe at least three conflicts of interests that medical professionals engaged in that led to the Opioid Epidemic
  • List at least three different types of insurance reform that has been suggested by health care experts regarding addiction treatment
  • Identify three major criticisms of the current addiction treatment industry

Date: October 11, 2017

Presenter:
Frank L. Greenagel II, MPAP, MSW, LCSW, LCADC, ICADC, CASAC, ACSW, CJC, CCS
Rutgers School of Social Work, Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies
New Jersey Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse


This webinar retraces the history of opiate use from opium to prescription drugs and track the long history of heroin use. It delves into how Big Pharma, doctors, insurance companies, marketers, the FDA, government policies, and consumers each hold some responsibility for the current epidemic, and what they can do to reverse this devastating trend. Every group comes out poorly here. But solutions that have been undertaken in a variety of states are offered at the conclusion.

Auditing as a Tool for Managing Environmental Improvement
Person Looking at Graph

Course Objective

  • Identify key components of an environmental compliance auditing regimen
  • Understand the impact of compliance auditing on environmental quality

Date: September 28, 2017

Presenter:
Howard N. Apsan, Ph.D.
University Director
Environmental, Health, Safety, and Risk Management, City University of New York


CUNY entered into a five-year audit and disclosure agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This forced CUNY to adjust to the rigors of an intensive compliance auditing regimen, but it also helped make environmental quality an integral part of the CUNY culture. Today, long after the original commitments were fulfilled, CUNY continues to conduct audits—now including health and safety and environmental management system components, as well—and uses the audit process as a fundamental tool for continual improvement.

Non-Cigarette Tobacco Products: Patterns of Use and Community-Level Prevention Strategies
White Male with Smoke from Vape Pen

Course Objective

  • Define and describe the non-cigarette tobacco products currently on the market.
  • Identify patterns of non-cigarette tobacco product use among youth and adults in the U.S.
  • Discuss potential community-level strategies to combat product use.

Date: February 7, 2017

Presenter:
Daniel Giovenco, PhD, MPH
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


Although cigarettes are still used by 15% of Americans and contribute significantly to premature morbidity and mortality in the United States, new non-cigarette tobacco products are becoming increasingly popular among youth and racial and ethnic minority populations. These products include cigars and cigarillos, hookah, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). Each non-cigarette tobacco product has different risks, patterns of use, and potential to create health disparities, making solutions for prevention and harm reduction as varied as the types of non-cigarette tobacco products. To prevent the use of non-cigarette tobacco products, public health professionals need to be able to define the current market of non-cigarette tobacco products, understand how these products are regulated by different levels of government, and use health promotion and disease prevention strategies at the community-level.

Health Policy Agenda Beyond the ACA
White Drawing on Blue Chalkboard

Course Objective

  • Explain the importance of considering social determinants of health when creating health-related messages
  • List techniques for developing targeted messages that increase awareness and promote action to address the social determinants of health
  • Describe research findings that demonstrate how personal ideology impacts how individuals receive, process, and interpret messages
  • Identify barriers to creating effective messages and media campaigns

Date: October 27, 2016

Presenter:
Dr. Drew Altman
CEO and President
Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation


Many Americans feel that commercial, political and ideological interests control the information that they consume. The Kaiser Family Foundation serves as an independent and non-partisan source of research, analysis and journalism for policymakers, the media and the general public. Kaiser aims to provide the highest quality coverage of health policy issues and developments at the federal and state levels and in the marketplace.

Dr. Drew Altman, CEO and President of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, is an innovator in the world of foundations and a leading expert on national health policy who publishes and speaks widely on health issues. Join him to discuss the future of health policy in the US.

Access to Care for Undocumented Patients
Colorful Paper Hands

Course Objective

  • Describe the extent to which undocumented immigrants are eligible for publicly funded health care programs
  • Assess the health consequences of existing health policy for undocumented immigrants
  • Evaluate state and local efforts to expand access for undocumented immigrants

Date: October 18, 2016

Presenter:
Michael K. Guzmano
Associate Professor
Rutgers University, School of Public Health Department of Health Systems and Policy


This presentation will review how federal, state and local policies influence access to health care for undocumented patients. The presenter will review the exclusion of these patients from major public health programs, analyze the consequences of these exclusions, and describe recent efforts by state and local governments to improve access for this population.

Region 2 Public Health Training Center