Category: Public Health Science

Primary Competency Area

The Challenge of Vaccine Hesitancy in the COVID Pandemic

Course Objective

  • Describe the continuum of vaccine acceptance and hesitancy
  • Identify the concerns that underlie hesitancy toward vaccination in general and COVID vaccination in particular 
  • Critique different approaches for achieving high uptake of COVID vaccines

Date: March 2nd, 2021

Presenter:
James Colgrove, PhD, MPH
Professor of Sociomedical Sciences,
Columbia Mailman School of Public Health
Dean of the Postbac Premed Program,
Columbia School of General Studies


This month’s Log-in2learn webinar comes at an opportune time, in the midst of a national vaccine rollout. Our presenter, James Colgrove, PhD, MPH, covers everything you need to know about vaccine hesitancy in the U.S.. He starts off with a brief history of the roots of vaccine hesitancy in the country and explains how these views have developed into the spectrum that we see today. He then shifts his attention to the COVID-19 pandemic, discussing the available vaccine options, their development process and the public’s response to them. He carefully walks us through the different concerns regarding the vaccine and breaks down the demographic characteristics of each group. He lays a heavy emphasis on the need to address hesitancy using targeted strategies that meet the unique needs of each group. He shares a number of approaches to do this and highlights key messages that have been effective. He ends by reiterating the main challenges and the importance of addressing broken relationships and mistrust as we attempt to address vaccine hesitancy during COVID-19.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the continuum of vaccine acceptance and hesitancy
  2. Identify the concerns that underlie hesitancy toward vaccination in general and COVID vaccination in particular 
  3. Critique different approaches for achieving high uptake of COVID vaccines
Policy Making and Systems Thinking: tools to help the public health workforce address challenging times

Course Objective

  • Define policy making in public health and how it can be used to achieve public health goals
  • Identify how systems thinking can strengthen public health policy development
  • Discuss how some of the essential steps in policy making and systems thinking can help address “wicked” public health challenges

Date: January  12th, 2021

Presenter:
Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS
Public Health Practice Consultant

Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH, MBA
Assistant Professor
Population and Family Health
Columbia University Medical Center


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Helen de Pinho, MBBCh, FCCH, MBA, and Sylvia Pirani, MPH, MS, walk us through the process of policy making and the role of systems thinking in combating complex challenges. Sylvia starts by highlighting the steps required to craft good policy and emphasizes the importance of incorporating community members and stakeholders in the process. She then identifies some of the common obstacles seen during this process and shares instances of the same. Helen goes on to unpack the concept of systems thinking, explaining how it can be used and why it is such an essential tool for policy makers and the public health workforce. She demonstrates the ways in which systems thinking can be used to address complex situations and tricky relationships in the policy making process through a series of examples. Finally, they both identify the next steps in policy making and share useful resources for policy identification and systems thinking during challenging times.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define policy making in public health and how it can be used to achieve public health goals
  2. Identify how systems thinking can strengthen public health policy development
  3. Discuss how some of the essential steps in policy making and systems thinking can help address “wicked” public health challenges
Collecting, Creating and Sharing Ethical Stories

Course Objective

  • Describe why framing and narratives of stories are the building blocks to changing hearts and mindsets. 
  • Explain ethics in storytelling and identify how to collect, create, and share stories in a manner that is respectful for the protagonist and community. 
  • Summarize different ways to find and collect stories from their staff, partners, and community.

Date: December 1st, 2020

Presenter:
Mark Dessauer, MA
Vice President of Learning
Spitfire Strategies


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Mark Dessauer, MA, is back for part two of the storytelling in public health series. Following his October webinar on the power of storytelling, he now shifts the focus on how to share the stories of others in an ethical way. He first discusses how stories can and have gone wrong in the past. He explains in detail the components that make up a good story, including the framing, narrative, influencers etc. Next, he emphasizes why ethical storytelling is so important and walks us through the 4 elements that can help achieve this. He goes on to talk about how to find these stories and where they can and should be shared. Throughout the session, Mark reiterates ways to keep the subjects of the story involved in the process and how to navigate the balance of power. Finally, he ends by sharing a number of tools that are effective in creating narratives around health equity.

Following the webinar participants will be able to:

  1. Describe why framing and narratives of stories are the building blocks to changing hearts and mindsets.
  2. Explain ethics in storytelling and identify how to collect, create, and share stories in a manner that is respectful for the protagonist and community.
  3. Summarize different ways to find and collect stories from their staff, partners, and community.
Change Management: How Leadership can Support Staff During Crises

Course Objective

  • Explain key elements of the adaptive leadership model.
  • List the 4 dimensions of change readiness and list questions to be raised under each dimension.
  • Describe how a planned change initiative can be implemented using Kotter’s 8-step model.

Launch Date: June 30th, 2020

Subject Matter Expert:
Emil J. Sadloch
President, Sadloch Development Associates & Instructor for Rutgers University’s Executive and Professional Education
School of Public Health, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences


The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. This training is the second in the Strategic Skills Training Series focused on Change Management for Public Health Professionals. This module explains the utility of the adaptive leadership model and the 4 dimensions of change readiness to address public health workforce issues, specifically focusing on staff morale. It also guides you through Kotter’s 8-step model to plan, implement, and sustain change within an organization.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Explain key elements of the adaptive leadership model.
  2. List the 4 dimensions of change readiness and list questions to be raised under each dimension.
  3. Describe how a planned change initiative can be implemented using Kotter’s 8-step model.
Social Inequality and Health Disparities in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Course Objective

  • Identify key trends in health disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic to date
  • Describe how the pandemic exacerbates existing social inequalities
  • Examine several proposed interventions to address health disparities in the pandemic response

Date: June 2nd, 2020

Presenter:
Alexandra Zenoff, MPH.
Senior Program Manager
East-West Management Institute, Inc. (EWMI)


In this month’s Log-in2Learn webinar Alexandra Zenoff discusses the role of structural racism in health disparities, how this affects health outcomes and the need to address it. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated social inequalities and considering the social determinants of health is crucial to alleviating this issue. Drawing insights from historic and current public health efforts can help with designing responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. The importance of building on existing best practices like community consultations and appropriate data collection is discussed. Participants are provided with articles for further learning and resources such as the COVID-19 racial tracker and CDC’s Social Vulnerability Index.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Identify key trends in health disparities during the COVID-19 pandemic to date
  2. Describe how the pandemic exacerbates existing social inequalities
  3. Examine several proposed interventions to address health disparities in the pandemic response
COVID-19: Where are we and Where are we going

Course Objective

Date: May 5, 2020

Presenter:
Wafaa M. El-Sadr, MD, MPH, MPA
Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine at Columbia University,
Director of ICAP at Columbia University,
Director of the Global Health Initiative at the Mailman School of Public Health

In this month’s Log-in2Learn Dr. Wafaa M. El-Sadr presents an overview of the epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19). Current statistics (as at the day of the webinar) show that racial/ethnic background, age and the presence of comorbidities lead to severity of outcomes. Participants are informed about known modes of transmission (droplets and contact) and the development process of future vaccines is discussed. Participants will understand the impacts of COVID-19 on the health system including a decrease in health services. As knowledge of COVID-19 continues to evolve, easing of mitigation measures needs to be done carefully to sustain progress that has been made.

After the webinar, participants will be able to:

  1. List key milestones in the spread of COVID-19
  2. Identify where New York City/NYS is in relation to the Whitehouse’s Guidelines for Opening Up America Again
  3. Describe what is being forecast for the next 6 months in relation to COVID-19
Plain Language: What is it? Why does it matter to health? How can you use it to advance health equity?

Course Objective

  • Identify language that makes comprehension difficult for readers
  • Apply basic strategies to make communication more clear
  • Connect to additional resources to advance their understanding of plain language

Date: January 7th 2020

Presenter:
Gretchen Van Wye, PhD, MA
Assistant Commissioner and Registrar, Bureau of Vital Statistics, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, participants will learn the basics of plain language from Dr. Gretchen Van Wye, Assistant Commissioner and Registrar for the Bureau of Vital Statistics for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Gretchen walks participants through basic strategies of clear communication and discusses how plain language is essential to advance health equity.

Participants will learn about the following three lessons about public health communication:

  1. Identify language that makes comprehension difficult for readers
  2. Apply basic strategies to make communication more clear
  3. Connect to additional resources to advance their understanding of plain language
Strategic Skills Training Series: Introduction to Persuasive Communication

Course Objective

By the end of this module, you should know how to:

  • Identify the key theories of persuasion
  • Identify instances where key theories of persuasion can be applied in a public health context
  • Conduct an audience analysis assessment for a persuasive presentation in a public health setting
  • Describe how to assess elements of key theories of persuasion to create a persuasive argument

…and see how you can incorporate these concepts in your practice to address a major public health crisis.

The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. The modules in this series use the community health improvement planning process to introduce you to the basics of the following four strategic skills areas. The first set of modules have been developed at an introductory level; the next part of the series will build on these foundational modules.

To help you think about ways to leverage these skills in your journey as a Chief Health Strategist to address real world problems in your community, the modules will utilize a case study approach, set in the fictitious Tycho County.

Follow how the Tycho County Health Department could adopt a systems approach to inform its thinking and planning while developing a community health improvement plan focused on a familiar public health problem, opioid misuse.

In this module, you will learn some strategy-based communication principles you can use across different settings and audiences.

Strategic Skills Training Series: Introduction to Systems Thinking

Course Objective

By the end of this module, you should know how to:

  • Consider events, patterns, and structures related to a complex problem
  • Explain what a complex adaptive system is
  • Explain how mental models impact the way we perceive a problem
  • List some key systems thinking habits to develop

…and see how you can incorporate these concepts in your practice to address a major public health crisis.

The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health practitioners to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. The modules in this series use the community health improvement planning process to introduce you to the basics of the following four strategic skills areas. This first set of modules have been developed at an introductory level; the next part of the series will build on these foundational modules.

To help you think about ways to leverage these skills in your journey as a Chief Health Strategist to address real world problems in your community, the modules will utilize a case study approach, set in the fictitious Tycho County.

Follow how the Tycho County Health Department could adopt a systems approach to inform its thinking and planning while developing a community health improvement plan focused on a familiar public health problem, opioid misuse.

In this module, you will learn how to identify the characteristics of a system in a public health context.

Change and Public Health: A Deeper Look into Leading Change Successfully

Course Objective

  • Identify key competencies for managing change in the role of the Chief Health Strategist and Public Health 3.0
  • Assess how change impacts individuals and organizations when addressing a major public health crisis
  • Describe how Kotter’s “8-Step Process for Leading Change” may help guide a successful organizational change initiative

Date: October 1, 2019

Presenter:
Emil J. Sadloch, MA
President, Sadloch Development Associates


In this Month’s Log-in2Learn webinar, participants learn about change management principles that public health professionals can utilize from Emil J. Sadloch, MA, President of SADLOCH DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES. Using a systems thinking approach to generate collaboration in Public Health 3.0, Emil provides an overview of how Chief Health Strategists can be change agents, who take the initiative in actualizing change. Emil highlights Kotter’s 8-Step Model for Leading Change as one of various frameworks for implementing change practices.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Identify key competencies for managing change in the role of the Chief Health Strategist and Public Health 3.0
  2. Assess how change impacts individuals and organizations when addressing a major public health crisis
  3. Describe how Kotter’s “8-Step Process for Leading Change” may help guide a successful organizational change initiative
Region 2 Public Health Training Center