Category: Uncategorized

Enumerating and Understanding New York’s Local Public Health Workforce

Course Objective

  • Communicate the methods used for enumerating the local public health workforce in New York State and present enumeration study results.
  • Describe the value of conducting public health workforce enumeration to inform public health practice and strategic workforce planning. 
  • Offer practical insights and best practices derived from the study as guidance for learners interested in conducting similar enumeration studies in other settings. 

Date: January 9, 2024

Presenters:
Molly Fleming, MPH
Senior Program Manager, New York State Association of County Health Officials

Isaac Michaels, MPH
Program Director, Research Science, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and DrPH Student at University at Albany School of Public Health


Molly Fleming and Isaac Michaels presented their findings from an enumeration study of local health departments in New York State. The presenters began by sharing the study background and methods, including collaborative efforts between academia and public health practice. They then summarized the findings of the study and changes in the workforce resulting from the impact of COVID-19. They went on to discuss successes, lessons learned, and next steps including continued assessment. They conclude with recommendations for working with public health schools as a pipeline to the public health workforce, the need for advocacy and civil service reform, and continued flexible sustainable funding. 

Climate Change: Using Technical and Adaptive Leadership to Identify and Address Extreme Heat

Course Objectives

  • Identify technical vs. adaptive challenges related to climate change
  • Assess, frame, and take action to address the climate change problem using data and evidence
  • Discuss the applicability of adaptive leadership to address the health impacts of climate change
  • Identify barriers to creating effective messages and media campaigns
  • Identify technical vs. adaptive challenges related to climate change

Date: July 1, 2023


Climate change can contribute to disruptions of physical, biological, and ecological systems, including disturbances originating locally and elsewhere. The health effects of these disruptions can be severe.

As climate change continues, some existing health threats will intensify and new health threats will emerge. Effective leadership in public health can take steps to lessen these impacts on the populace.

This self-paced module course will focus on how local health departments can take action to adapt to the health impacts of climate change such as rising temperatures, using principles of adaptive leadership.

Participants will learn to:

  1. Describe roles that local health departments can play to address the health impacts of climate change.
  2. Assess, frame, and take action to address the climate change problem using data and evidence.
  3. Define adaptive leadership and adaptive leadership behaviors.
  4. Discuss the applicability of adaptive leadership to address the health impacts of climate change.
  5. Identify technical vs. adaptive challenges related to climate change.
A Systems Approach to Reduce Gun Violence

Course Objective

  • Discuss the public health approach to addressing gun violence
  • Discuss the applicability of systems thinking to address gun violence
  • Describe the roles that local public health agencies can play to address gun violence, including supporting gun safety

Date: July 1, 2023

Gun violence is a major public health issue causing significant death, injuries and years of life lost. Gun violence and gun safety are complex public health problems and challenges that can benefit from a systems-thinking approach. This self-paced module course will focus on how local health departments can take action to address gun violence in their communities. The course describes two examples of how different counties in the state are applying the public health approach to gun violence in their communities and using systems thinking to help define the problem and identify risk factors and areas to intervene.

Recruitment and Retention in Public Health

Course Objectives

  • List the six steps in the recruitment process
  • List tools you can use to prioritize the positions you need to fill
  • Describe how diversity, equity, and inclusion are part of each step of the recruitment and retention process
  • Explain the importance of a well-written job description, and how a description is different from a job posting or job advertisement
  • Describe the basics of recruitment marketing and employer branding
  • Identify at least three potential partners for developing recruitment partnerships
  • Explain how to improve communications with job candidates
  • List key elements of onboarding and retention

Date: July 1, 2023


In this self-paced module course, Dr. Heather Krasna, Associate Dean, Career Services and Professional Development at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, provides a crash course on recruitment and retention of new hires, from start to finish.

Public Health’s “Equity Clout” Problem: What Is It And How Do We Address It To Achieve Structural and Cultural Humility?

Course Objectives

  • Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  • Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  • Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.

Date: June 04, 2023

Presenter:
Jerel Ezell, PhD, MPH
Director, Cornell Center for Cultural Humility
Assistant Professor in General Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine


Dr. Jerel Ezell presents on the importance of equity clout and what that means in the context of public health departments working to build structural and cultural humility. He begins by describing three primary factors that contribute to diminished equity clout. Ezell goes on to discuss approaches for bridging the equity clout gap. He ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  2. Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  3. Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.
Region 2 Public Health Training Center