Category: Webinar

Question, Persuade, and Refer: Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention

Course Objective

  • Define the scope and scale of suicide as a public health issue in the US
  • Describe the warning signs common to someone experiencing thoughts of suicide
  • List practical steps they can take if they have encountered someone experiencing current thoughts of suicide

Date: November 1st, 2022

Presenter:
Garra Lloyd-Lester
Coordinator of Community and Coalition Initiatives
Suicide Prevention Center of New York


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Garra Lloyd-Lester presents on training for suicide prevention. He begins by describing the scope and scale of suicide in the US. He then explains sensitive and trauma-informed language, how to invite people to talk about suicide, and suicide clues and warning signs. Finally, Lloyd-Lester explains the Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) method for suicide prevention.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Define the scope and scale of suicide as a public health issue in the US
  2. Describe the warning signs common to someone experiencing thoughts of suicide
  3. List practical steps they can take if they have encountered someone experiencing current thoughts of suicide
Monkeypox: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, Challenges and Opportunities

Course Objective

  • List key epidemiological features of the Monkeypox 2022 Outbreak
  • Describe stigma and disparities in relation to Monkeypox
  • Describe lessons learned from HIV and COVID-19 that should inform the monkeypox response

Date: October 4th, 2022

Presenter:
Wafaa M. El-Sadr, MD, MPH, MPA
Executive Vice President, Columbia Global
University Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine at Columbia University
Director of ICAP at Columbia University


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Dr. Wafaa M. El-Sadr, Executive Vice President at Columbia Global, University Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine at Columbia University, and Director of ICAP at Columbia University, presents an update on the current Monkeypox outbreak. She begins by explaining the Monkeypox virus and the epidemiology of the current 2022 outbreak. She then explains its clinical characteristics, along with current vaccinations and treatment. Finally, Dr. El-Sadr discusses stigma and disparities surrounding Monkeypox, as well as lessons from HIV and COVID-19 that can inform the Monkeypox response.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List key epidemiological features of the Monkeypox 2022 Outbreak
  2. Describe stigma and disparities in relation to Monkeypox
  3. Describe lessons learned from HIV and COVID-19 that should inform the monkeypox response
Adaptation to Stress: Five Practices to Cultivate Resilience and Work-Life Wellbeing

Course Objective

  • Examine your work-life wellbeing and causes of work-life conflict
  • Explain a model of resilience (stressors, protective factors, adaptive & maladaptive coping strategies, resilience, thriving)
  • List five practices to cultivate resilience (mindfulness, using stress to grow, self-leadership, positivity, renewal)

Date: September 13th, 2022

Presenter:
Mary Steinhardt, EdD
Professor and Associate Vice President for Research – Research Integrity Officer,
The University of Texas at Austin


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Dr. Mary Steinhardt presents practices that can be used to adapt to change and stressful situations, promoting resilience and work-life wellbeing. She starts by defining work-life wellbeing and discusses strategies to optimize it. She then explains the stress response and presents a model of resilience. Dr. Steinhardt concludes by presenting five practices that can be used to grow our resilience.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Examine your work-life wellbeing and causes of work-life conflict
  2. Explain a model of resilience (stressors, protective factors, adaptive & maladaptive coping strategies, resilience, thriving)
  3. List five practices to cultivate resilience (mindfulness, using stress to grow, self-leadership, positivity, renewal
Gun Laws, Mental Illness and Stigma

Course Objective

  • Describe the development of gun laws as they relate to individuals with mental illness
  • Recognize the relationship between mental illness and violence
  • Explain the relationship between stigma and treatment participation, and the effects gun laws can have

Date: August 2nd, 2022

Presenter:
Merrill Rotter, MD
Senior Forensic Advisor to the Commissioner, NYS OMH
Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, AECOM


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Dr. Merrill Rotter explores the connection between gun violence, gun laws, and mental health. He explains the relationship between mental health and guns, and how the stigma around mental health impacts gun legislation. He starts by reviewing a timeline of prominent gun legislation and instances of gun violence in the United States. Dr. Rotter then explains the efficacy of gun legislation as it relates to gun violence and mental illness. He concludes by discussing the impact of recent events regarding the gun debate in the United States.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the development of gun laws as they relate to individuals with mental illness
  2. Recognize the relationship between mental illness and violence
  3. Explain the relationship between stigma and treatment participation, and the effects gun laws can have
New Resources and Creative Strategies for Recruiting Candidates for Health Departments

Course Objective

  • Describe the industry/sector and occupational competition for key roles in public health
  • Identify at least three strategies and tactics your agency can use to attract new hires
  • Assess feasibility of recruitment strategies for your own agency/organization

Date: June 7th 2022

Presenters: 
Heather Krasna, PhD, EdM, MS
Assistant Dean and Director, Career Services, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Laura J. Trolio
Director, New York State Public Health Corps Fellowship Program, Office of Public Health Practice

Jody Ordioni
Chief Brand Officer, Brandemix


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Dr. Heather Krasna, Laura Trolio, and Jody Ordioni present new evidence-based resources and strategies to overcome current challenges in public health recruitment. They explain how understanding candidate motivation, creating or leveraging appealing recruitment marketing materials, leveraging the public service motivation of candidates, and highlighting the mission-driven work of public health agencies can help agencies attract the best candidates and compete with other employers. They review strategies such as branding, making a Unique Sales Proposition, and the new forthcoming public health recruitment website for standardized job posting. They also present new funding streams and the NYS Public Health Corps Fellowship Program, with its Public Health Essentials Certificate and mentoring opportunities. There is a focus, throughout, on diversity, equity and inclusion in recruitment, and they finish by answering questions from attendees.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the industry/sector and occupational competition for key roles in public health
  2. Identify at least three strategies and tactics your agency can use to attract new hires
  3. Assess feasibility of recruitment strategies for your own agency/organization
Commercial Determinants of Health : A New Framework for Improving Population Health and Reducing Health Inequities

Course Objective

  • Define commercial determinants  of health and explain the historical origins of this concept
  • Identify the  potential and limitations of the commercial determinants of health framework for development of more effective strategies to improve population health and reduce health inequities
  • Discuss key current needs for research, education  and practice on commercial determinants of health

Date: May 3rd, 2022

Presenter:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH
Distinguished Professor of Public Health
CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy
Senior Faculty Fellow, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Dr. Nicholas Freudenberg presents how the commercial determinants of health framework can help reduce health inequities, guided by the belief that another world is possible. He starts by defining commercial determinants of health and reviewing the cascade of public health crises that have happened in the 21st century. He goes over a framework that attributes this cascade and increases in stratification, inequality, and inequity to changes in 6 characteristics of capitalism. He then reviews the importance of changing corporate practices and political and economic structures that harm health, and lists key ideas and strategies that can help tackle that change. He finishes by providing specific examples of how public health professionals can build more alliances and move practice beyond business as usual, and answers questions from attendees.

Participants will be able t0:

  1. Define commercial determinants of health and explain the historical origins of this concept
  2. Identify the potential and limitations of the commercial determinants of health framework for development of more effective strategies to improve population health and reduce health inequities
  3. Discuss key current needs for research, education and practice on commercial determinants of health
COVID-19: From Pandemic to Endemic

Course Objective

  • Differentiate between “Pandemic” and “Endemic,” with examples from COVID-19 and other infectious diseases
  • Describe examples from the HIV epidemic that may apply to the COVID-19 pandemic
  • Explain implications for public health practice as the field transitions from a pandemic to endemic response to COVID-19

Date: April 5th, 2022

Presenter:
Dr. Jessica Justman
 Associate Professor of Medicine in Epidemiology
Columbia University Irving Medical Center


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Dr. Jessica Justman, Associate Professor of Medicine in Epidemiology at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center, goes over epidemiology concepts and skills as illustrated by the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. She starts by defining the terms epidemic, pandemic, and endemic as they relate to infectious diseases. She then explains how COVID-19 went from an outbreak to an epidemic, and reviews the progression and classification of epidemics. In addition to the example of COVID-19, she speaks to the toll and spread of other pandemics in history. In particular, she highlights the similarities between HIV and COVID-19 pandemics, including spread, overall burden and disparities, public health and community-driven responses, communication challenges, and issues of uncertainty and fear. Finally, she summarizes lessons learned from the progression and response to COVID-19, commenting on how we could have been better prepared.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Differentiate between “Pandemic” and “Endemic,” with examples from COVID-19 and other infectious diseases
  2. Describe examples from the HIV epidemic that may apply to the COVID-19 pandemic
  3. Explain implications for public health practice as the field transitions from a pandemic to endemic response to COVID-19
Developing and Implementing Climate and Health Adaptations: An Update from the NYSDOH BRACE Project

Course Objective

  • Describe the Building Resilience Against Climate Effects, or BRACE, framework for climate and health adaptation work.
  • Identify at least 3 resources for gaining knowledge about likely impacts of climate change on health in NYS.
  • Describe examples of climate and health adaptation-related activities that have been conducted in NYS.

Date: March 1st, 2022

Presenter:
Neil Muscatiello, MS
Director, Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology,
New York State Department of Health


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Neil Muscatiello, director of the NYSDOH Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology reviews the importance and progress of the Building Resilience Against Climate Effects (BRACE) framework for climate and health adaptation work in New York. He starts by contextualizing the human impact on climate and New York State projections, including warming trends and increased precipitations. He then explains how the BRACE model builds on evidence such as the climate impact assessments from ClimAID, which summarize observed and projected impacts across 8 sectors, and the county heat and health profile reports, which correlate temperature increases to poor health outcomes. He then traces the climate change adaptations steps, and goes over some example adaptations, such as the benefit analysis of heating and cooling assistance on hospitalizations, the Climate Smart Community certification. He ends by sharing information about regional climate and health adaptation workshops, additional resources, and answering attendees’ questions.

Participants will learn to:

  1. Describe the Building Resilience Against Climate Effects, or BRACE, framework for climate and health adaptation work
  2. Identify at least 3 resources for gaining knowledge about likely impacts of climate change on health in NYS.
  3. Describe examples of climate and health adaptation-related activities that have been conducted in NYS.
Introducing the 2021 Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals

Course Objective

  • Describe the Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals.
  • Identify changes made in the 2021 version of the Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals.
  • Discuss how the Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals can be used to support the public health workforce.

Date: February 1st, 2022

Presenter:
Kathleen Amos, MLIS
Director, Academic/Practice Linkages
Public Health Foundation


In this month’s Log-In Learn, Kathleen Amos, Director of the Academic and Practice Linkages for the Public Health Foundation, presents the newly revised Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals. She introduces the Core Competencies as a longstanding initiative of the PHF’s Council on Linkages between academia and public health practice, in an effort to synthesize the foundational or cross cutting skills for public health professionals. She presented an overview of their usage, including Healthy People 2030, the Public Health Accreditation Board, and the TRAIN Learning Network. She explained that revision included two open comment periods, but feedback is always welcome, including after the webinar. She reviewed the main feedback received, including requests for better harmonization, expanded content on certain topic areas (especially health equity and management and finance), and increased ease of use, and explained how each of these were addressed. She concluded by sharing resources and tools, training, and assistance for implementation of the updated Core Competencies.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Describe the Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals.
  2. Identify changes made in the 2021 version of the Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals.
  3. Discuss how the Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals can be used to support the public health workforce.
Connecting the Dots With Systemic Thinking for Equitable and Healthiest Communities

Course Objective

  • Define key concepts, including: systems, systemic thinking, equity, social justice, and complexity.
  • Explain how systemic thinking links to existing frameworks for equitable and healthier communities.
  • Demonstrate use of two tools for exploring deep leverage points.

Date: January 11th, 2022

Presenter:
Priti Irani, MSPH
Research Scientist

Office of Public Health Practice, New York State Department of Health


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Priti Irani, MSPH connects system thinking to the revised 10 Essential Public Health Services, which put health equity at the center. She begins by introducing the New York State Prevention Agenda, and defining key concepts of justice, systemic thinking, and targeted universalism. She then illustrates a concrete application of systems thinking by going through the example of food insecurity in New York State as a complex problem. She demonstrates how to use the iceberg model to look for hidden structures and mental models, as well as a causal loop diagram to find deep leverage points that guide interventions for greater impact. Finally, she shares additional online resources to continue the learning and application of systems thinking, and answer questions from live webinar participants, including incorporating paradigm shifts into different jobs.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define key concepts, including: systems, systemic thinking, equity, social justice, and complexity.
  2. Explain how systemic thinking links to existing frameworks for equitable and healthier communities.
  3. Demonstrate use of two tools for exploring deep leverage points.
Region 2 Public Health Training Center