Category: Webinar

Flourishing through Adversity: How Can Stress and Emotional Experiences Make Us Resilient and Avoid Burnout

Course Objective

  • Understand the relationships among stress, emotions, burnout, and health. 
  • Measure and monitor one’s “positivity ratio” and explain the implications of these scores. 
  • Identify and apply effective strategies to cope with stress, reduce negative emotional experiences, prevent burnout, and promote resilience. 

Date: February 6, 2024

Presenters:
Christian Gloria, PhD, MA, CHES.
Associate Professor & Deputy Chair, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Director, MPH Certificate in Health Promotion Research & Practice, Principal Investigator Region 2 Public Health Training Center, Board Member, New York State Public Health Association


How do you handle stress and stressors at work, school, and life? This session presented current research in positive psychology, emotionality, and health. Dr. Gloria discussed how experiences of certain emotions affect our abilities to cope with stress, and their influences on our mental and physical health. During this talk, audience members participated in an exercise to score their own stressors and emotional experiences, and learned the implications of their results. The session then concluded with recommendations on how to reduce stress, increase positivity, improve coping, be happier, be healthier, and be able to flourish at work, school, and in life. 

The Swag Deficit: How and Why Public Health Sucks All The Fun Out of Everything

Course Objective

  • Understand primary gaps and weaknesses in how public health presents itself and engages communities
  • Define and discuss “swag deficit” at a barbeque or cocktail party
  • Identify ways to develop a swag surplus or make your public health organization swag neutral

Date: September 5, 2023

Presenter:
Jerel Ezell, PhD MPH
Director of Cornell Center for Cultural Humility
Assistant Professor in General Medicine
Weill Cornell University


Jerel Ezell presents on the importance of “swag” and what that means in the context of public health departments working to build a stronger public presence. He begins by describing three primary factors that contribute to a “swag deficit”. Ezell goes on to discuss approaches for engaging with communities. He ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps.

Participants will be able to:

  • Understand primary gaps and weaknesses in how public health presents itself and engages communities
  • Define and discuss “swag deficit” at a barbeque or cocktail party 
  • Identify ways to develop a swag surplus or make your public health organization swag neutral
Public Health’s “Equity Clout” Problem: What Is It And How Do We Address It To Achieve Structural and Cultural Humility?

Course Objectives

  • Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  • Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  • Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.

Date: June 04, 2023

Presenter:
Jerel Ezell, PhD, MPH
Director, Cornell Center for Cultural Humility
Assistant Professor in General Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine


Dr. Jerel Ezell presents on the importance of equity clout and what that means in the context of public health departments working to build structural and cultural humility. He begins by describing three primary factors that contribute to diminished equity clout. Ezell goes on to discuss approaches for bridging the equity clout gap. He ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  2. Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  3. Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.
Teaching the Commercial Determinants of Health: A Workshop Webinar

Course Objective

  • Explain how commercial determinants of health (CDoH) differ from social determinants and how do these two ideas fit together or conflict.
  • Describe how public health faculty are already teaching about CDoH and assess how their experiences can guide faculty and students who want to learn more
  • Identify ways in which public health programs can ensure that students and faculty have the needed competencies in this field

Date: May 31, 2023

Panelists:
Nicholas Freudenberg
Distinguished Professor of Public Health
City University of New York

Mark Petticrew
Professor
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Cecile Knai
Professor
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Vibhuti Arya
Professor
St John’s University
Clinical Advisor to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Eric Crosbie
Associate Professor
University of Nevada, Reno

Moderators:
Raquel Burgess
Yale PhD Student

Erinn Bacchus
City University of New York PhD Student


Defined by the WHO as “private sector activities that affect people’s health”, the Commercial Determinants of Health (CDoH) framework has the potential to inform powerful new approaches to reducing the world’s most serious public health problems.

Are you interested in the Commercial Determinants of Health (CDoH) and how schools and programs of public health can apply the CDoH framework? This webinar is designed to prepare faculty and students at schools and programs of public health to apply the CDoH perspective to their teaching, research and advocacy.

In this webinar, participants will learn from leading academic experts about the CDoH and how schools and programs of public health can apply the CDoH framework to their teaching, research, and advocacy. This discussion can be used as a starting point for sharing experiences and materials, identifying best practices, and setting competencies in CDoH for public health professionals. Participants will be invited to join small discussion groups and a learning community on teaching about CDoH in public health programs.

The Science of Trust: Implications for Public Health Research and Practice

Course Objective

  • List key determinants of trust and trustworthiness at the community, population, and patient levels
  • Discuss the impact of trust and mistrust on behavioral and social outcomes as related to a variety of health topics
  • Describe implications of “the science of trust” for public health research and practice

Date: March 7, 2023

Presenter:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


Renata Schiavo presents on the importance of trust in public health research and practice. She begins by defining “trust” and explaining the importance of gaining trust among communities. Schiavo goes on to discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted trust and presents commonly used models of trust. “The science of trust” is then explained by the interconnected nature of biological, social, political and environmental factors, and a new model of trust is presented. Schiavo ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps

Participants will learn about trust in public health research and practice from Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL, from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.Participants will be able to:-List key determinants of trust and trustworthiness at the community, population, and patient levels-Discuss the impact of trust and mistrust on behavioral and social outcomes as related to a variety of health topics-Describe implications of “the science of trust” for public health research and practiceRecommended Reading:-Renata Schiavo (2022) The ‘Science of Trust’: moving the field forward, Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 15:2, 75-77, DOI: 10.1080/17538068.2022.2089611https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538068.2022.2089611-Renata Schiavo (Moderator and Roundtable Chair/Organizer), Gil Eyal (Participant), Rafael Obregon (Participant), Sandra C. Quinn (Participant), Helen Riess (Participant) & Nikita Boston-Fisher (Co-Organizer) (2022) The science of trust: future directions, research gaps, and implications for health and risk communication, Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 15:4, 245-259, DOI: 10.1080/17538068.2022.2121199https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538068.2022.2121199

 

This program has been approved for 1.0 Category I Continuing Education Credit for CHES/MCHES by the Rutgers School of Public Health. The Rutgers School of Public Health is a certified CHES/MCHES provider by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc.

This program has been approved for 1.0 Certified in Public Health (CPH) credit by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center. The Region 2 Public Health Training Center is a certified CPH provider by the National Board of Public Health Examiners.

Mortality surveillance using an Automated Mortality Syndromic Surveillance System (MortalSS) – Lessons Learned from New York City

Course Objective

  • Identify aberrations in time-series data.
  • Classify free text cause of death data into multiple ICD-10 code categories using Natural Language Processing (NLP).
  • Construct interactive html dashboards in R and RStudio.

Date: February 7th, 2023

Presenter:
Alejandro F. Castro III, MPH
Mortality Surveillance Analyst,
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH)


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Alejandro Castro III presents on mortality surveillance using an Automated Mortality Syndromic Surveillance System (MortalSS). He begins by explaining the importance of mortality surveillance in New York City and reviews the death registration process. He goes on to explain MortalSS, including time series analysis, model implementation, and interactive dashboards. He then discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted mortality surveillance in New York City and the potential future impact of MortalSS. Castro ends by explaining artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) for ICD-10 cause of death coding.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify aberrations in time-series data.
  2. Classify free text cause of death data into multiple ICD-10 code categories using Natural Language Processing (NLP).
  3. Construct interactive html dashboards in R and RStudio.
Leveraging a bilingual communications campaign to promote physical activity: Muévete a tu Manera

Course Objective

  • Discuss the recommendations in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition and key findings to be communicated 
  • Identify physical activity trends and diabetes prevalence in Spanish speaking populations 
  • Describe how communities can leverage Muévete a tu Manera campaign to promote physical activity for Spanish speakers 

Date: January 10th, 2023

Presenter:
Joshua Chigozie Ogbuefi, MPH
Health Communications Fellow
Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
U.S Department of Health and Human Services 


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Joshua Chigozie Ogbuefi discusses the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans 2nd edition (Guidelines) and its key recommendations and findings related to how much physical activity Americans need and the benefits of physical activity, including the prevention of chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes. Additionally, Ogbuefi identifies current physical activity rates among U.S populations and the estimated burden of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes among Spanish speaking populations. Lastly, Ogbuefi highlights a bilingual communications campaign that focuses on increasing awareness and knowledge of the Guidelines, physical activity self-efficacy, and changing behavior. Ogbuefi describes how organizations can leverage the campaign to promote physical activity in their communities.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the recommendations in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition and key findings to be communicated 
  2. Identify physical activity trends and diabetes prevalence in Spanish speaking populations 
  3. Describe how communities can leverage Muévete a tu Manera campaign to promote physical activity for Spanish speakers 
Adaptive Leadership: Strategies for Public Health

Course Objective

  • List highlights of the leadership approach known as “Adaptive Leadership”
  • Describe situational challenges as technical or adaptive
  • Identify the three phases of the “Adaptive Leadership” process
  • Apply the “Adaptive Leadership” behaviors to situations facing public health professionals

Date: December 6th, 2022

Presenter:
Emil J. Sadloch
SADLOCH DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATES


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Emil Sadloch presents on the leadership approach known as “Adaptive Leadership.” He begins by defining “Adaptative Leadership” and explaining the difference between technical and adaptive situational challenges. He goes on to describe the three phases of the “Adaptive Leadership” model: Observe, Interpret, and Intervene. Sadloch ends by presenting a case study and explaining how “Adaptive Leadership” can be applied to a current public health issue.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List highlights of the leadership approach known as “Adaptive Leadership”
  2. Describe situational challenges as technical or adaptive
  3. Identify the three phases of the “Adaptive Leadership” process 
  4. Apply the “Adaptive Leadership” behaviors to situations facing public health professionals 
Question, Persuade, and Refer: Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention

Course Objective

  • Define the scope and scale of suicide as a public health issue in the US
  • Describe the warning signs common to someone experiencing thoughts of suicide
  • List practical steps they can take if they have encountered someone experiencing current thoughts of suicide

Date: November 1st, 2022

Presenter:
Garra Lloyd-Lester
Coordinator of Community and Coalition Initiatives
Suicide Prevention Center of New York


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Garra Lloyd-Lester presents on training for suicide prevention. He begins by describing the scope and scale of suicide in the US. He then explains sensitive and trauma-informed language, how to invite people to talk about suicide, and suicide clues and warning signs. Finally, Lloyd-Lester explains the Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) method for suicide prevention.

Participants will learn about the following:

  1. Define the scope and scale of suicide as a public health issue in the US
  2. Describe the warning signs common to someone experiencing thoughts of suicide
  3. List practical steps they can take if they have encountered someone experiencing current thoughts of suicide
Monkeypox: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, Challenges and Opportunities

Course Objective

  • List key epidemiological features of the Monkeypox 2022 Outbreak
  • Describe stigma and disparities in relation to Monkeypox
  • Describe lessons learned from HIV and COVID-19 that should inform the monkeypox response

Date: October 4th, 2022

Presenter:
Wafaa M. El-Sadr, MD, MPH, MPA
Executive Vice President, Columbia Global
University Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine at Columbia University
Director of ICAP at Columbia University


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Dr. Wafaa M. El-Sadr, Executive Vice President at Columbia Global, University Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine at Columbia University, and Director of ICAP at Columbia University, presents an update on the current Monkeypox outbreak. She begins by explaining the Monkeypox virus and the epidemiology of the current 2022 outbreak. She then explains its clinical characteristics, along with current vaccinations and treatment. Finally, Dr. El-Sadr discusses stigma and disparities surrounding Monkeypox, as well as lessons from HIV and COVID-19 that can inform the Monkeypox response.

Participants will be able to:

  1. List key epidemiological features of the Monkeypox 2022 Outbreak
  2. Describe stigma and disparities in relation to Monkeypox
  3. Describe lessons learned from HIV and COVID-19 that should inform the monkeypox response
Region 2 Public Health Training Center