Category: Webinar

Harnessing the Power of Music, Movement, Culture, and Science to Build Youth Health Literacy and Inspire Health Behavior Change
Harnessing the Power of Music, Movement, Culture, and Science to Build Youth Health Literacy and Inspire Health Behavior Change Lori Rose Benson, MA, DrPH Candidate CEO, Hip Hop Public Health Livestreaming: May 7th, 2024 at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Understand the connection between music and the brain 
  • Explain how music can be leveraged to enhance public health and health education efforts 
  • Describe ways to implement and integrate Hip Hop Public Health’s evidence-based tools and resources into health promotions 

 

Date: May 7, 2024

Presenters:
Lori Rose Benson, MA, DrPH Candidate
CEO, Hip Hop Public Health


This inspiring session featured Lori Rose Benson, CEO of Hip Hop Public Health, a non-profit dedicated to creating and disseminating research-based educational resources by harnessing the power of music and culture to improve health in communities that are underserved. Lori takes viewers on a journey through Hip Hop Public Health’s visionary approach to enhance health education and public health communication via the intersection of music, movement, culture, and science, revealing how these elements can be harnessed to cultivate positive health behavior change among today’s youth. 

 

 

Trauma-Informed Care: What it is and Why it Matters: Three-Part Webinar Series

This three-part webinar series, for local health department and FQHC staff, will explore key concepts around trauma-informed care. From the challenges in the lives of our most vulnerable community members to the global upheaval brought by the COVID-19 pandemic, we see the impacts of trauma all around us. In this series, we will define trauma and examine techniques for reducing its effect in our workplace and in the communities we serve.

Session 1: What is trauma? 
What is the difference between a bad experience and a traumatic event? We will discuss the definition of trauma. We will also examine the findings of the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, the largest study of its kind that correlates adversity in childhood with the leading causes of early deaths in adults. The neurobiology of trauma sheds light on what interventions lead to healthier out-comes. We will also discuss how positive childhood experiences correlate with resilience.

Session 2: Trauma and marginalized communities 
The marginalization of groups based on race, gender, culture, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, gender identity, etc. exacerbates the experience of trauma and adversity. We will discuss how racism and other forms of oppression impact individual and community health, as well as how policies and practices aimed at addressing hidden biases support healing and resilience.

Session 3: Helping the helper
Many people come to work in helping professions because of their own experiences with trauma and adversity. In serving individuals that have been impacted by trauma, helpers can be further affected by secondary traumatic stress and vicarious trauma. We will explore how this happens, as well as strategies to counteract it.

Presented by: Andrus Sanctuary Institute in collaboration with New York State Association of County Health Officials

Nicotine and Neighborhoods: Findings from a Policy Evaluation and Retailer Assessment Study in NYC
Nicotine and Neighborhoods: Findings from a Policy Evaluation and Retailer Assessment Study in NYC Daniel P. Giovenco, PhD, MPH Assistant Professor, Dept of Sociomedical Sciences Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health Livestreaming: March 5th, 2024 at 12-1 pm ET 2

Course Objective

  • Explain the relationship between nicotine product retail in communities, use behaviors, and inequities
  • Describe the early impacts of a policy initiative to reduce tobacco retailer density in NYC
  • Discuss the current landscape of product availability for newer classes of nicotine products across several US cities

Date: March 5, 2024

Presenters:
Daniel P. Giovenco, PhD, MPH
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Dr. Giovenco presented his findings from a study investigating the effectiveness of a policy to reduce the density of tobacco retailers in New York City. He began by explaining the issue of tobacco retailer density and its relation to communities and inequities. He went on to summarize the evaluation methods used to evaluate the policy’s effectiveness, utilizing GIS technology. He then summarized the findings of the study and changes in the number of tobacco retailers in various neighborhoods resulting from the impact of the new policy. As a bonus, Dr. Giovenco also shared preliminary findings of a new study investigating shifts in tobacco product availability in three major U.S. cities, as related to the retailer limiting policy. He concludes with a call for more research efforts to investigate variations in retail access, use behaviors, and tobacco product risks. 

Flourishing through Adversity: How Can Stress and Emotional Experiences Make Us Resilient and Avoid Burnout
Flourishing through Adversity: How Can Stress and Emotional Experiences Make Us Resilient and Avoid Burnout Christian Gloria, PhD, MA,CHES® Associate Professor & Deputy Chair, Dept. of Sociomedical Sciences Director, MPH Certificate in Health Promotion Research & Practice Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Principal Investigator, Region 2 Public Health Training Center Board Member, New York State Public Health Association Livestreaming: February 6th, 2024 at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Understand the relationships among stress, emotions, burnout, and health. 
  • Measure and monitor one’s “positivity ratio” and explain the implications of these scores. 
  • Identify and apply effective strategies to cope with stress, reduce negative emotional experiences, prevent burnout, and promote resilience. 

Date: February 6, 2024

Presenters:
Christian Gloria, PhD, MA, CHES.
Associate Professor & Deputy Chair, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Director, MPH Certificate in Health Promotion Research & Practice, Principal Investigator Region 2 Public Health Training Center, Board Member, New York State Public Health Association


How do you handle stress and stressors at work, school, and life? This session presented current research in positive psychology, emotionality, and health. Dr. Gloria discussed how experiences of certain emotions affect our abilities to cope with stress, and their influences on our mental and physical health. During this talk, audience members participated in an exercise to score their own stressors and emotional experiences, and learned the implications of their results. The session then concluded with recommendations on how to reduce stress, increase positivity, improve coping, be happier, be healthier, and be able to flourish at work, school, and in life. 

The Swag Deficit: How and Why Public Health Sucks All The Fun Out of Everything
The Swag Deficit: How and Why Public Health Sucks All The Fun Out of Everything Jerel Ezell, PhD, MPH Director, Cornell Center for Cultural Humility Assistant Professor in General Medicine Weill Cornell Medicine Livestreaming: September 5th, 2023, at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Understand primary gaps and weaknesses in how public health presents itself and engages communities
  • Define and discuss “swag deficit” at a barbeque or cocktail party
  • Identify ways to develop a swag surplus or make your public health organization swag neutral

Date: September 5, 2023

Presenter:
Jerel Ezell, PhD MPH
Director of Cornell Center for Cultural Humility
Assistant Professor in General Medicine
Weill Cornell University


Jerel Ezell presents on the importance of “swag” and what that means in the context of public health departments working to build a stronger public presence. He begins by describing three primary factors that contribute to a “swag deficit”. Ezell goes on to discuss approaches for engaging with communities. He ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps.

Participants will be able to:

  • Understand primary gaps and weaknesses in how public health presents itself and engages communities
  • Define and discuss “swag deficit” at a barbeque or cocktail party 
  • Identify ways to develop a swag surplus or make your public health organization swag neutral
Public Health’s “Equity Clout” Problem: What Is It And How Do We Address It To Achieve Structural and Cultural Humility?
Public Health's "Equity Clout" Problem: What Is It And How Do We Address It To Achieve Structural and Cultural Humility? Jerel Ezell, PhD, MPH Director, Cornell Center for Cultural Humility Assistant Professor in General Medicine Weill Cornell Medicine Livestreaming: June 6th, 2023, at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objectives

  • Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  • Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  • Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.

Date: June 04, 2023

Presenter:
Jerel Ezell, PhD, MPH
Director, Cornell Center for Cultural Humility
Assistant Professor in General Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine


Dr. Jerel Ezell presents on the importance of equity clout and what that means in the context of public health departments working to build structural and cultural humility. He begins by describing three primary factors that contribute to diminished equity clout. Ezell goes on to discuss approaches for bridging the equity clout gap. He ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Examine what equity clout means in the context of public health departments’ efforts to build structural and cultural humility.
  2. Describe three primary factors contributing to diminished equity clout.
  3. Identify three approaches for bridging the equity clout gap.
Teaching the Commercial Determinants of Health: A Workshop Webinar
Teaching the Commercial Determinants of Health: A Workshop Webinar • Nick Freudenberg, City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health • Mark Petticrew/Cecile Knai, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine • Vibhuti Arya, St. John's University and Clinical Advisor to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene • Eric Crosbie, University of Nevada, Reno Livestreaming: May 31st, 2023 at 10:00 - 11:30 am ET

Course Objective

  • Explain how commercial determinants of health (CDoH) differ from social determinants and how do these two ideas fit together or conflict.
  • Describe how public health faculty are already teaching about CDoH and assess how their experiences can guide faculty and students who want to learn more
  • Identify ways in which public health programs can ensure that students and faculty have the needed competencies in this field

Date: May 31, 2023

Panelists:
Nicholas Freudenberg
Distinguished Professor of Public Health
City University of New York

Mark Petticrew
Professor
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Cecile Knai
Professor
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Vibhuti Arya
Professor
St John’s University
Clinical Advisor to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Eric Crosbie
Associate Professor
University of Nevada, Reno

Moderators:
Raquel Burgess
Yale PhD Student

Erinn Bacchus
City University of New York PhD Student


Defined by the WHO as “private sector activities that affect people’s health”, the Commercial Determinants of Health (CDoH) framework has the potential to inform powerful new approaches to reducing the world’s most serious public health problems.

Are you interested in the Commercial Determinants of Health (CDoH) and how schools and programs of public health can apply the CDoH framework? This webinar is designed to prepare faculty and students at schools and programs of public health to apply the CDoH perspective to their teaching, research and advocacy.

In this webinar, participants will learn from leading academic experts about the CDoH and how schools and programs of public health can apply the CDoH framework to their teaching, research, and advocacy. This discussion can be used as a starting point for sharing experiences and materials, identifying best practices, and setting competencies in CDoH for public health professionals. Participants will be invited to join small discussion groups and a learning community on teaching about CDoH in public health programs.

The Science of Trust: Implications for Public Health Research and Practice
The Science of Trust: Implications for Public Health Research and Practice Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL Senior Lecturer, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Founder and Board President, Health Equity Initiative; Principal, Strategies for Equity and Communication Impact (SECI) Livestreaming: March 7th, 2023 at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • List key determinants of trust and trustworthiness at the community, population, and patient levels
  • Discuss the impact of trust and mistrust on behavioral and social outcomes as related to a variety of health topics
  • Describe implications of “the science of trust” for public health research and practice

Date: March 7, 2023

Presenter:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health


Renata Schiavo presents on the importance of trust in public health research and practice. She begins by defining “trust” and explaining the importance of gaining trust among communities. Schiavo goes on to discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted trust and presents commonly used models of trust. “The science of trust” is then explained by the interconnected nature of biological, social, political and environmental factors, and a new model of trust is presented. Schiavo ends by suggesting implications for practice and next steps

Participants will learn about trust in public health research and practice from Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL, from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.Participants will be able to:-List key determinants of trust and trustworthiness at the community, population, and patient levels-Discuss the impact of trust and mistrust on behavioral and social outcomes as related to a variety of health topics-Describe implications of “the science of trust” for public health research and practiceRecommended Reading:-Renata Schiavo (2022) The ‘Science of Trust’: moving the field forward, Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 15:2, 75-77, DOI: 10.1080/17538068.2022.2089611https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538068.2022.2089611-Renata Schiavo (Moderator and Roundtable Chair/Organizer), Gil Eyal (Participant), Rafael Obregon (Participant), Sandra C. Quinn (Participant), Helen Riess (Participant) & Nikita Boston-Fisher (Co-Organizer) (2022) The science of trust: future directions, research gaps, and implications for health and risk communication, Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 15:4, 245-259, DOI: 10.1080/17538068.2022.2121199https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538068.2022.2121199

 

This program has been approved for 1.0 Category I Continuing Education Credit for CHES/MCHES by the Rutgers School of Public Health. The Rutgers School of Public Health is a certified CHES/MCHES provider by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc.

This program has been approved for 1.0 Certified in Public Health (CPH) credit by the Region 2 Public Health Training Center. The Region 2 Public Health Training Center is a certified CPH provider by the National Board of Public Health Examiners.

Mortality surveillance using an Automated Mortality Syndromic Surveillance System (MortalSS) – Lessons Learned from New York City
Mortality surveillance using an Automated Mortality Syndromic Surveillance System (MortalSS) - Lessons Learned from New York City Alejandro F. Castro III, MPH Mortality Surveillance Analyst, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Livestreaming: February 7th, 2023 at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Identify aberrations in time-series data.
  • Classify free text cause of death data into multiple ICD-10 code categories using Natural Language Processing (NLP).
  • Construct interactive html dashboards in R and RStudio.

Date: February 7th, 2023

Presenter:
Alejandro F. Castro III, MPH
Mortality Surveillance Analyst,
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYCDOHMH)


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Alejandro Castro III presents on mortality surveillance using an Automated Mortality Syndromic Surveillance System (MortalSS). He begins by explaining the importance of mortality surveillance in New York City and reviews the death registration process. He goes on to explain MortalSS, including time series analysis, model implementation, and interactive dashboards. He then discusses how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted mortality surveillance in New York City and the potential future impact of MortalSS. Castro ends by explaining artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) for ICD-10 cause of death coding.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Identify aberrations in time-series data.
  2. Classify free text cause of death data into multiple ICD-10 code categories using Natural Language Processing (NLP).
  3. Construct interactive html dashboards in R and RStudio.
Leveraging a bilingual communications campaign to promote physical activity: Muévete a tu Manera
Leveraging a bilingual communications campaign to promote physical activity: Muévete a tu Manera Joshua Chigozie Ogbuefi, MPH Health Communications Fellow, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Livestreaming: January 10th 2023 at 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Discuss the recommendations in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition and key findings to be communicated 
  • Identify physical activity trends and diabetes prevalence in Spanish speaking populations 
  • Describe how communities can leverage Muévete a tu Manera campaign to promote physical activity for Spanish speakers 

Date: January 10th, 2023

Presenter:
Joshua Chigozie Ogbuefi, MPH
Health Communications Fellow
Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP)
U.S Department of Health and Human Services 


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Joshua Chigozie Ogbuefi discusses the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans 2nd edition (Guidelines) and its key recommendations and findings related to how much physical activity Americans need and the benefits of physical activity, including the prevention of chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes. Additionally, Ogbuefi identifies current physical activity rates among U.S populations and the estimated burden of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes among Spanish speaking populations. Lastly, Ogbuefi highlights a bilingual communications campaign that focuses on increasing awareness and knowledge of the Guidelines, physical activity self-efficacy, and changing behavior. Ogbuefi describes how organizations can leverage the campaign to promote physical activity in their communities.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the recommendations in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition and key findings to be communicated 
  2. Identify physical activity trends and diabetes prevalence in Spanish speaking populations 
  3. Describe how communities can leverage Muévete a tu Manera campaign to promote physical activity for Spanish speakers 
Region 2 Public Health Training Center