Health Disparities in HIV: Supporting Adolescents through the Care Continuum

Presenter:Tanner_Headshot
Amanda Tanner
Associate Professor
University of North Carolina – Greensboro

Description:

This webinar explores the specific challenges associated with ensuring adolescents are able to access HIV screening and treatment. Dr. Amanda Tanner provides background on adolescent’s biological, cognitive, social, and legal changes as they progress to adulthood as well as the disparities of HIV diagnosis and care among adolescents, especially minority youth. This presentation continues with an overview of two studies that investigate care linkage and engagement for youth with newly diagnosed HIV as well as the HIV-related healthcare transition at adolescent clinics. Dr. Tanner provides recommendations for future interventions that will help adolescents know their HIV status, become linked with appropriate care, and maintain viral suppression.

Course Objectives:

  1. Define the adolescent specific HIV-related health disparities in the United States.
  2. Describe the individual and structural level factors impeding youth’s progress through the HIV Care Continuum.
  3. Identify potential individual and structural level intervention points to support the health of youth living with HIV.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1B1, 1C1, 5A2, 5A3, 6B4, 6C4, 8A3, 8A5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Addressing Unconscious Bias in our Language

Presenter:
Anne Marie Liebel, EdDAMLphoto
Founder and President
Health Communication Partners LLC

Description:

As health professionals, it is critical that we reflect and address unconscious bias in our language, especially when working with patient populations. Dr. Anne Marie Liebel discusses how uttering subtle microaggressions can have a cumulative negative effect on health and wellness. Dr. Liebel presents research on the linkages between microaggressions and health disparities. In particular, microaggressions from healthcare providers can negatively impact patient health related behaviors and utilization of health services. Thus, as we recognize our own microaggressions, Dr. Liebel provides individual and organizational strategies to examine, expand, and alter language to provide more equitable care and services.

Course Objectives:

  1. Evaluate your thoughts or behaviors for unconscious bias
  2. Explain ways that language use can intentionally or unintentionally contribute to health disparities
  3. Describe ways that your organization can work to examine, expand, and alter language regarding patients and clients to provide more equitable care and services

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A2, 3A3, 3A6, 3A7, 3B2, 3B3, 3B6, 3B7, 3C2, 3C3, 3C6, 3C7, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Engaging Across Sectors and Disciplines to Build Community and Capacity for Health Equity

Presenter:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCLRenata Pic
Founding President and Board of Director Member, Health Equity Initiative
Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Description:

Disparities in health and healthcare are connected to population health and affect the delivery, access and quality of care, especially for vulnerable populations. There are social determinants (i.e. housing, built environment, age) that can negatively affect health outcomes.  Dr. Renata Schiavo, Founding President of the Health Equity Initiative (HEI), discusses how professionals across sectors and disciplines can collaborate to build healthier communities. The term health equity is defined and framed as a human rights and social justice issue that will provide individuals with the same opportunities to stay healthy and cope with crises, regardless of socioeconomic factors and other social determinants. Regardless of status, Dr. Schiavo views health equity as a priority for all and uses case studies to exemplify how multi-sector partnerships can effectively mobilize communities to reduce health disparities and healthcare costs. By working with communities and using community engagement approaches, these multi-sector partnerships can foster community ownership and sustainability of health innovations. Dr. Schiavo also provides methods and strategies to bring multidisciplinary stakeholders together in order to develop sustainable, equitable solutions.

Course Objectives:

  1. Define community
  2. Engage in multi-sectoral partnerships and interventions for health equity
  3. Implement strategies within your organization to advance health equity

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A8, 3B8, 38C, 4A1, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4B1, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4C1, 4C3, 4C5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Understanding Depression Differences through a Dynamic Framework of Gender

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Presenter:jon platt image
Jonathan Platt, MPH, MPhil
Psychiatric Epidemiology Fellow
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University
Mailman School of Public Health

Description:

Currently, the literature indicates that women are much more likely than men to be diagnosed with depression. While there have been some who try to attribute this difference to various research flaws, there is good evidence to refute these rebuttals and there do in fact appear to be gender differences in mental health. In this webinar, Jonathan Platt, MPH, MPhil, discusses the epidemiology of depression and the various hypotheses that have been proposed to explain the “gender gap.” These include issues of genes and hormones, social stress, epigenetics, and others. He describes the dynamic perspectives of gender and the importance of intersectionality in research design and program planning.

Course Objectives:

  • To define the “gender gap” in depression
  • To identify the hypothesized biological reasons for the “gender gap” in depression
  • To identify the hypothesized social and environmental reasons for the “gender gap” in depression
  • To explain the differences in how depression manifests in males vs. females
  • To describe the research that refutes common objections to the “gender gap” in depression
  • To describe the dynamic perspectives of gender

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, 1A9, 1A10, 1A11, 1A14, 1B1, 1B3, 1B4, 1B5, 1B6, 1B9, 1B10, 1C1, 1C4, 1C5, 1C6, 1C9, 2A5, 2A7, 2A10, 3A2, 3A5, 3A8, 3B2, 3B5, 3C2, 3C5, 4A1, 4A2, 4A6, 4B1, 4B2, 4C1, 4C2, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A7, 5B3, 5B9, 5C3, 6A4, 6A5, 6A6, 6A7, 6A8, 6B5, 6B8, 6B9, 6C5, 6C6, 6C8, 6C9, 8A1, 8A2, 8A3, 8A5, 8B1, 8B2, 8B5, 8B10, 8C1, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

 

Health Disparity in the Transgender Community

Title:   Health Disparity within The Transgender Community

Date: January 21, 2016

Presenter:  Beck Gee-Cohen, MA LADC

Individuals who identify as transgender are at greater risk of health disparity. Understanding that gender is not binary is vital to helping clients receive appropriate services. Helping those who do not subscribe to the gender binary and those who are questioning gender is an important consideration for public health professionals in order to provide affirmative services to an underserved population. This webinar will help providers grasp concepts of gender outside the binary, allow providers to identify key elements in helping the Trans population, and create understanding the diversity of the Trans community in receiving health and wellness services.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify appropriate terminology as it pertains to sexual identity / gender identification
  • Recognize key services and resources providers can utilize to assist trans community

Continuing Education:

  • CHES/MCHES
  • NJ Public Health

 

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Critical Consciousness-based Health Promotion Interventions for Racial and Sexual Minority Populations

Presenter:pw2219_Wilson-Patrick_0

Patrick Wilson, PhD
Associate Professor
Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Description:

Critical Consciousness involves becoming aware of the broader social, political, and cultural forces that perpetuate oppression and inequality. Helping to raise individuals’ awareness and recognition of such forces in their daily lives can fuel empowerment, self-esteem, and other precursors to positive health behavior change. In this webinar, Dr. Patrick Wilson will discuss how critical consciousness can be used to support behavior change interventions for marginalized groups, such as black MSM youth.

After participating in this webinar, attendees will be able to:

  • Define Critical Consciousness
  • Describe the Mobilizing our Voices for Empowerment (MOVE) intervention for young Black gay/bisexual men living with HIV
  • Discuss current and future critical consciousness intervention research

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1A4, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 1A11, 1A12, 1A13, 1A14, 1B1, 1B2, 1B3, 1B4, 1B5, 1B6, 1B7, 1B8, 1B9, 1B10, 1B11, 1B12, 1B13, 1B14, 4A1, 4A2, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4A7, 4B1, 4B2, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4B6, 4B7, 4B8, 5A10, 5B11, 8A1, 8A2, 8A4, 8A5, 8B1, 8B2, 8B4, 8B5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Supportive Housing to Address Social Determinants: Cross-sector Collaborations and Funding Possibilities

Presenter:kristen-miller-photo

Kristin Miller
Director
Corporation for Supportive Housing

Description:

In this webinar, Kristen Miller, Director of Corporation for Supportive Housing, discusses housing as a social determinant of health, describes supportive housing models, and provides examples of how to use data to identify and target individuals in need of supportive housing.

By attending this webinar, participants will:

  • Gain a better understanding of housing as a key social determinant and the impact housing interventions have had in healthcare outcomes and costs
  • Learn about strategies to effectively understand, target and define frequent user population for population health interventions
  • Identify key stakeholders to implement a frequent user initiative including key lessons learned, challenges and best practices

Reflection questions:

  • What is supportive housing is and for whom should it be targeted?
  • How can health departments and public health professionals contribute to local initiatives to address housing needs affecting the health of their most vulnerable residents?
  • What are opportunities to expand resources available to address prevention and health care needs of residents with housing challenges?

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1A4, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, A8, 1A9, 1A10, 1A11, 1A12, 1A13, 1A14, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5A5, 5A6, 5A7, 5A8, 5A9, 5A10, 7A1, 7A2, 7A3, 7A4, 7A5, 7A6, 7A7, 7A8, 7A9, 7A10, 7A11, 7A12, 7A13, 7A14, 8A1, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8A5, 8A6, 8A7, 8A8, 8A9

1B1, 1B2, 1B3, 1B4, 1B5, 1B5, 1B6, 1B7, 1B8, 1B9, 1B10, 1B11, 1B12, 1B13, 1B14, 1B1, 55B1, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5B6, 5B7, 5B8, 5B9, 5B10, 5B11, 7B1, 7B2, 7B3, 7B4, 7B5, 7B6, 7B7, 7B8, 7B9, 7B10, 7B11, 7B12, 7B13, 7B14, 7B15, 7B16, 8B1, 8B2, 8B3, 8B4, 8B5, 8B6, 8B7, 8B8, 8B9, 8B10

1C1, 1C2, 1C3, 1C4, 1C5, 1C6, 1C7, 1C8, 1C9, 1C10, 1C11, 1C12, 1C13, 1C14, 1C15, 5C1, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5, 5C6, 5C7, 5C8, 5C9, 5C10, 5C11, 7C1, 7C2, 7C3, 7C4, 7C5, 7C6, 7C7, 7C8, 7C9, 7C10, 7C11, 7C12, 7C13, 7C14, 7C15, 7C16, 8C1, 8C2, 8C3, 8C4, 8C5, 8C6, 8C7, 8C8, 8C9, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Sex Differences in the Relation Between Social Stressors and Obesity

sfs2150_3_Shakira F Suglia_0Presenter: Shakira F. Suglia, ScD, MS

Associate Professor
Epidemiology
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Date: April 5th, 2016

Description: In this webinar, Dr. Suglia provides an overview of the physiological responses to stressors and their relationship to obesity.  Stressors have a significant impact on mental and physical health, with high levels of stress associated with eating disorders and obesity.  There is also a sociodemographic gradient within this relationship, meaning that individuals with low SES experience a greater number of social risk factors and suffer more frequently from obesity.  This disparity is also seen between genders, with girls and women experiencing more stress than their male counterparts.

 

Recommended pre-webinar reading: Suglia, SF, Clark CJ, Gary-Webb TL. (2013) Adolescent obesity, change in weight status, and hypertension: racial/ethnic variations. Hypertension 61(2) pp 290-295.

Reflection Questions: What are the challenges in defining social stressors across the life course? Why is it important to examine sex differences when examining the effect of social stressors? What are some potential mechanisms by which social stressors impact obesity?

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 2A5, 4A3, 5A2, 8A4

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Public Health Live / T2B2: Confronting Health Disparities: Obesity and Prevention in African American Communities

Organization that developed training: University of Albany School of Public Health

Description: More than one-third of U.S. adults (over 72 million people) and 17% of U.S. children are obese; substantial differences exist in obesity prevalence by race/ethnicity, and these differences vary by sex and age. The prevalence of obesity among adults from 2007-2010 was largest among African American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups. Obesity increases the risk of many preventable health conditions, including heart disease, stroke and diabetes. African Americans live sicker and die younger than any other ethnic group in the nation. African Americans have the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations.

This program focuses on the reality of African-American health disparity–why it exists and the impact of environment, income and other determinants of health on the incidence of diabetes, obesity and heart disease within African American communities, and what can be done about it.

Year Launched: 2015

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

Take this training here

Planning and Implementing Evidenced-Based HIV Outreach and Prevention Strategies for MSM and Transgender People: Model Programs and Tools

Organization that developed training: National LGBT Health Education Center, The Fenway Institute

Description: This session focuses on best and promising practices in reaching transgender women and black men who have sex with men. The presenters will share preliminary findings from research studies that are being implemented by the Fenway Institute and their own experiences on how to engage high risk transgender women and black MSM in HIV prevention and treatment.

Year Launched: 2013

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 2 Public Health Professionals

Take this training here