Supportive Housing to Address Social Determinants: Cross-sector Collaborations and Funding Possibilities

Presenter:kristen-miller-photo

Kristin Miller
Director
Corporation for Supportive Housing

Description:

In this webinar, Kristen Miller, Director of Corporation for Supportive Housing, discusses housing as a social determinant of health, describes supportive housing models, and provides examples of how to use data to identify and target individuals in need of supportive housing.

By attending this webinar, participants will:

  • Gain a better understanding of housing as a key social determinant and the impact housing interventions have had in healthcare outcomes and costs
  • Learn about strategies to effectively understand, target and define frequent user population for population health interventions
  • Identify key stakeholders to implement a frequent user initiative including key lessons learned, challenges and best practices

Reflection questions:

  • What is supportive housing is and for whom should it be targeted?
  • How can health departments and public health professionals contribute to local initiatives to address housing needs affecting the health of their most vulnerable residents?
  • What are opportunities to expand resources available to address prevention and health care needs of residents with housing challenges?

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1A4, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, A8, 1A9, 1A10, 1A11, 1A12, 1A13, 1A14, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5A5, 5A6, 5A7, 5A8, 5A9, 5A10, 7A1, 7A2, 7A3, 7A4, 7A5, 7A6, 7A7, 7A8, 7A9, 7A10, 7A11, 7A12, 7A13, 7A14, 8A1, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8A5, 8A6, 8A7, 8A8, 8A9

1B1, 1B2, 1B3, 1B4, 1B5, 1B5, 1B6, 1B7, 1B8, 1B9, 1B10, 1B11, 1B12, 1B13, 1B14, 1B1, 55B1, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5B6, 5B7, 5B8, 5B9, 5B10, 5B11, 7B1, 7B2, 7B3, 7B4, 7B5, 7B6, 7B7, 7B8, 7B9, 7B10, 7B11, 7B12, 7B13, 7B14, 7B15, 7B16, 8B1, 8B2, 8B3, 8B4, 8B5, 8B6, 8B7, 8B8, 8B9, 8B10

1C1, 1C2, 1C3, 1C4, 1C5, 1C6, 1C7, 1C8, 1C9, 1C10, 1C11, 1C12, 1C13, 1C14, 1C15, 5C1, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5, 5C6, 5C7, 5C8, 5C9, 5C10, 5C11, 7C1, 7C2, 7C3, 7C4, 7C5, 7C6, 7C7, 7C8, 7C9, 7C10, 7C11, 7C12, 7C13, 7C14, 7C15, 7C16, 8C1, 8C2, 8C3, 8C4, 8C5, 8C6, 8C7, 8C8, 8C9, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Housing as an Intermediary Determinant of Health and Points of Intervention to Reduce Disparities

Housing is where our economic, social, and personal lives come together. In this webinar, Dr. Angela Aidala and Dr. Robert Fullilove discuss housing as an intermediary social determinant of health and health equity. Fundamental determinants of health are macro-level cultural and economic policies, practices and dynamics that affect the socioeconomic position of individuals, groups and communities. These determinants operate directly on us through more proximal ‘intermediary’ determinants like housing to shape health outcomes. Housing links upstream fundamental determinants of health to the more immediate physical and social environments in which we live our lives.

By participating in this webinar, individuals will be able to:
• Understand the importance of housing and housing systems as intermediary determinants of health.
• Identify opportunities for public health policy and programmatic points of action in housing and housing systems to improve individual and community health.
• Learn from cross-sectoral initiatives involving local and state health departments that have targeted housing and residential environments as strategic points of intervention.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1B1, 1C1, 2A1, 2A2, 2A7, 2A9,  2B1, 2B2, 2B7, 2B9, 2C1, 2C2, 2C7, 2C9, 4A1, 4A2, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4B1, 4B2, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4B6, 4C1, 4C2, 4C3, 4C4, 4C5,4C6, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5B1, 5B2, 5B3,5C2, 5C3, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8A5, 8B2, 8B3, 8B4, 8B5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

The Effects of Exposure to Better Neighborhoods on Children: New Evidence from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment

The Effects of Exposure to Better Neighborhoods on Children: New Evidence from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment

 

Abstract:
The Moving to Opportunity (MTO) experiment offered randomly selected families living in high-poverty housing projects housing vouchers to move to lower-poverty neighborhoods. We present new evidence on the impacts of MTO on children’s long-term outcomes using administrative data from tax returns. We nd that moving to a lower-poverty neighborhood significantly improves college attendance rates and earnings for children who were young (below age 13) when their families moved. These children also live in better neighborhoods themselves as adults and are less likely to become single parents. The treatment effects are substantial: children whose families take up an experimental voucher to move to a lower-poverty area when they are less than 13 years old have an annual income that is $3,477 (31%) higher on average relative to a mean of $11,270 in the control group in their mid-twenties. In contrast, the same moves have, if anything, negative long-term impacts on children who are more than 13 years old when their
families move, perhaps because of disruption effects. The gains from moving fall with the age when children move, consistent with recent evidence that the duration of exposure to a better environment during childhood is a key determinant of an individual’s long-term outcomes. The findings imply that offering families with young children living in high-poverty housing projects vouchers to move to lower-poverty neighborhoods may reduce the intergenerational persistence of poverty and ultimately generate positive returns for taxpayers.

American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy

ACEEE is an nonprofit dedicated to advancing energy efficiency for economic prosperity and environmental protection. The ACEEE offers a variety of energy efficiency “portals” for visitors to peruse in order to learn about energy consumption and existing energy efficiency policies across multiple sectors in the US. News and blog articles, publications (research reports), and a calendar of events, focused on all things relating to clean energy, provide additional information on ways to promote energy security in the US.

http://aceee.org/

Association for Energy Affordability

An organization that aims to bring energy efficiency to new and existing buildings as a way to promote and maintain affordable and healthy housing and communities. This organization’s work is focused on engaging a range of educational, technical, and construction management activities and services to improve low-income housing and communities.

Programs offered include: “energy audits, modeling, project work scope and specification development, construction management, bench-marking and energy usage monitoring, and green building design services for high performance new construction.”

http://aea.us.org/