Critical Consciousness-based Health Promotion Interventions for Racial and Sexual Minority Populations

Presenter:pw2219_Wilson-Patrick_0

Patrick Wilson, PhD
Associate Professor
Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Description:

Critical Consciousness involves becoming aware of the broader social, political, and cultural forces that perpetuate oppression and inequality. Helping to raise individuals’ awareness and recognition of such forces in their daily lives can fuel empowerment, self-esteem, and other precursors to positive health behavior change. In this webinar, Dr. Patrick Wilson will discuss how critical consciousness can be used to support behavior change interventions for marginalized groups, such as black MSM youth.

After participating in this webinar, attendees will be able to:

  • Define Critical Consciousness
  • Describe the Mobilizing our Voices for Empowerment (MOVE) intervention for young Black gay/bisexual men living with HIV
  • Discuss current and future critical consciousness intervention research

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1A4, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, 1A11, 1A12, 1A13, 1A14, 1B1, 1B2, 1B3, 1B4, 1B5, 1B6, 1B7, 1B8, 1B9, 1B10, 1B11, 1B12, 1B13, 1B14, 4A1, 4A2, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4A7, 4B1, 4B2, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4B6, 4B7, 4B8, 5A10, 5B11, 8A1, 8A2, 8A4, 8A5, 8B1, 8B2, 8B4, 8B5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Supportive Housing to Address Social Determinants: Cross-sector Collaborations and Funding Possibilities

Presenter:kristen-miller-photo

Kristin Miller
Director
Corporation for Supportive Housing

Description:

In this webinar, Kristen Miller, Director of Corporation for Supportive Housing, discusses housing as a social determinant of health, describes supportive housing models, and provides examples of how to use data to identify and target individuals in need of supportive housing.

By attending this webinar, participants will:

  • Gain a better understanding of housing as a key social determinant and the impact housing interventions have had in healthcare outcomes and costs
  • Learn about strategies to effectively understand, target and define frequent user population for population health interventions
  • Identify key stakeholders to implement a frequent user initiative including key lessons learned, challenges and best practices

Reflection questions:

  • What is supportive housing is and for whom should it be targeted?
  • How can health departments and public health professionals contribute to local initiatives to address housing needs affecting the health of their most vulnerable residents?
  • What are opportunities to expand resources available to address prevention and health care needs of residents with housing challenges?

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1A4, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, A8, 1A9, 1A10, 1A11, 1A12, 1A13, 1A14, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5A5, 5A6, 5A7, 5A8, 5A9, 5A10, 7A1, 7A2, 7A3, 7A4, 7A5, 7A6, 7A7, 7A8, 7A9, 7A10, 7A11, 7A12, 7A13, 7A14, 8A1, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8A5, 8A6, 8A7, 8A8, 8A9

1B1, 1B2, 1B3, 1B4, 1B5, 1B5, 1B6, 1B7, 1B8, 1B9, 1B10, 1B11, 1B12, 1B13, 1B14, 1B1, 55B1, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5B6, 5B7, 5B8, 5B9, 5B10, 5B11, 7B1, 7B2, 7B3, 7B4, 7B5, 7B6, 7B7, 7B8, 7B9, 7B10, 7B11, 7B12, 7B13, 7B14, 7B15, 7B16, 8B1, 8B2, 8B3, 8B4, 8B5, 8B6, 8B7, 8B8, 8B9, 8B10

1C1, 1C2, 1C3, 1C4, 1C5, 1C6, 1C7, 1C8, 1C9, 1C10, 1C11, 1C12, 1C13, 1C14, 1C15, 5C1, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5, 5C6, 5C7, 5C8, 5C9, 5C10, 5C11, 7C1, 7C2, 7C3, 7C4, 7C5, 7C6, 7C7, 7C8, 7C9, 7C10, 7C11, 7C12, 7C13, 7C14, 7C15, 7C16, 8C1, 8C2, 8C3, 8C4, 8C5, 8C6, 8C7, 8C8, 8C9, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Promote Living Wages

Description:

The social determinants of health, or the structures and economic systems that shape patterns of wellness and illness, can be considered “upstream” causes of health that then influence downstream factors like obesity and teen pregnancy. Upstream factors are broad, deeply entrenched in our society, and can appear daunting to change. While public health often focuses on individual-level health behaviors, this approach requires a high level of effort from the targeted individual and has little influence on widespread population health. Health departments are increasingly moving upstream to tackle the core issues that affect the communities they serve. Income is one upstream factor that has a large impact on health and well-being. This training details how raising the minimum wage is a public health issue and provides a case study of one health department that used research, communication, and advocacy to influence an upstream factor of health.

By the end of this module participants will be able to:

  • Explain the rationale for expanding public health practice to change living conditions to promote health and equity;
  • Consider action on living conditions to be part of their scope of work;
  • Identify some of the conceptual and organizational obstacles state and local health departments face in addressing living conditions;
  • Explain how to apply the “upstream” strategies to define and achieve feasible goals in their own practice.

Continuing Education Available: 1.0 CHES, 1.0 CPH

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A9, 1B1, 1B14, 1B15, 2B6, 2B8, 3B8, 3B5, 4B6, 5B1, 5B3, 5B10, 6B7, 6C2, 8B2, 8B3, 8B5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Healthy Food Access in Urban Areas: Barriers and Solutions

Organization that developed training: Johns Hopkins University

Description: This Grand Rounds presentation describes the availability of healthy food in urban areas and discusses barriers to finding healthy food available for purchase in urban areas. This archived webcast features two speakers: Holly Freishtat, CN, MS, the Food Policy Director at the Baltimore Office of Sustainability, and Anne Palmer, MA, the Program Director of Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.

Year Launched: 2012

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

Take this training here

Health and Society

Organization that developed training: HarvardX

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the major social variables—social class, race, gender, poverty, income distribution, social networks/support, community cohesion, the work and neighborhood environment—that affect population health. The course covers the theoretical underpinnings of each construct (e.g. “race” as a social category), and surveys the empirical research linking each to population health status. Methods are introduced to operationalize each construct for the purposes of empirical application in epidemiological research.

Year Launched: 2013

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

Take this training here

Community Change in Public Health

Organization that developed training: Johns Hopkins University

Description: In bringing about behavior change in public health, we often focus on the individual mother, student, or farmer. We should not forget the community structure and norms constrain for encouraging individual health behaviors. This course examines the community context of the changes needed to promote the public’s health. We begin by examining the various definitions of ‘community’ and the processes by which we ‘diagnose’ or seek to understand the structure and characteristics of different types of communities. An appreciation of community similarities and differences is necessary lest we fall into the trap of designing one-size-fits-all interventions. We need to recognize that no matter that outsiders may view a community as poor or neglected, we can find strengths and capacities for improvement in each community. Identifying community capacities and resources is the first step in facilitating community change. Different practical and philosophical approaches to change and therefore, examined. Specific to the change process is our recognition of the need for communities to participate in the design, implementation and evaluation of any intervention. We examine the concept of participation in an effort to see how different levels of involvement may affect sustainability of community change efforts. Finally a case study of a community participatory approach to onchocerciasis control in Africa is presented. Community Directed Intervention has subsequently been successfully applied to providing other essential primary health care services by and in the community, such as insecticide treated bednets, malaria treatment, vitamin A distribution, deworming medicines, and pneumonia and diarrhea case management.

Year Launched: 2013

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

Take this training here

Promoting Health Equity : A Resource to Help Communities Address Social Determinants of Health

This workbook is for community-based organizations, public health practitioners, and community health partners seeking to create health equity by addressing the social determinants of health.  It was created to encourage and support the development of new, and the expansion of existing, initiatives and partnerships to address the social determinants of health inequities. Content is drawn from Social Determinants of Disparities in Health: Learning from Doing, a forum sponsored by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in October 2003. Forum participants included representatives from community organizations, academic settings, and public health practice who have experience developing, implementing, and evaluating interventions to address conditions contributing to health inequities. The workbook reflects the views of experts from multiple arenas, including local community knowledge, public health, medicine, social work, sociology, psychology, urban planning, community economic development, environmental sciences, and housing. It is designed for a wide range of users interested in developing initiatives to increase health equity in their communities. The workbook builds on existing resources and highlights lessons learned by communities working toward this end. Readers are provided with information and tools from these efforts to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that address social determinants of health equity.

Promoting Health Equity : A Resource to Help Communities Address Social Determinants of Health

THRIVE Advances a Shared Understanding of Social Determinants of Health: A Louisiana Case Example

Created by Prevention Institute (PI), THRIVE, a place-based and action-oriented tool and framework, engages community leaders, residents, public health practitioners and multiple sectors in a process of assessing, identifying and improving community conditions that can facilitate better health, safety and equity outcomes. As a regional manager for the Louisiana Public Health Institute, Jennifer’s new awareness of the social determinants of health created a fundamental shift in her approach to community- based health improvement.

LPHI THRIVE Case Example

CDC Community Health Improvement Navigator

The CDC Community Health Improvement Navigator (CHI Navigator) is a website for people who lead or participate in CHI work within hospitals and health systems, public health agencies, and other community organizations. It is a one-stop-shop that offers community stakeholders expert-vetted tools and resources for:

-Depicting visually the who, what, where, and how of improving community health
-Making the case for collaborative approaches to community health improvement
-Establishing and maintaining effective collaborations
-Finding interventions that work for the greatest impact on health and well-being for all

One of the four action areas by which you can seach the database is “Socioeconomic Factors.” This allows professionals to narrow down their search to better address social determinants of health.

http://www.cdc.gov/CHInav/

What Works For Health

This is a database that provides communities with information to help select and implement evidence-informed policies, programs, and system changes that will improve the variety of factors we know affect health. Included in the database are programs that address social and economic factors, such as education, employment, income, family and social support, and community safety — all of which are important in addressing social determinants of health.

http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/roadmaps/what-works-for-health