Roots of Health Inequity: A Web-Based Course for the Public Health Workforce

Organization that developed training: National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO)

Description: Roots of Health Inequity is an online learning collaborative and web-based course designed for the public health workforce. The site offers a starting place for those who want to address systemic differences in health and wellness that are actionable, unfair, and unjust. Based on a social justice framework, the course is an introduction to ground public health practitioners in concepts and strategies for taking action in everyday practice.

Each unit provides an in-depth look at a specific topic using various types of learning modalities — interactive maps and timelines, slideshows, geographic story-telling, resource libraries, video presentations, and interviews with practitioners.

Year Launched: 2012

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

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Resilience From Our Roots

Organization that developed training: Albany School of Public Health

Description: This archived webcast is one of four courses in the American Indian Series within the Advancing Cultural Competence Certificate Program.

Beverly Cook (Mohawk Nation), St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Council Chief and family nurse practitioner, discusses the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) scale and the impact of high ACES scores on adult health and wellbeing, advocating for a trauma-informed approach to care that involves administering ACE and resilience scales in clinics. She also describes important, culturally-based healing programs that are being implemented on the Akwesasne Reserve, including rites of passage and Centering Pregnancy.

Year Launched: 2015

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

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HIV/AIDS and Racial/Ethnic Disparities in the United States: Understanding the Context and Promising Approaches to Close the Gaps

Organization that developed training: Michigan Public Health Training Center

Description: This archived webcast features a presentation from the 26th Annual PHSAD Minority Health Conference on February 22, 2013 at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. The conference was entitled “Innovative Approaches to HIV & AIDS Prevention Among Youth.”

This session focuses on a review of the most recent epidemiologic data regarding the state of HIV/AIDS in the United States, with a particular focus on the severe and disproportionate impact on many African American communities. Dr. Sutton reviews what we know about the social and structural contexts as well as individual risk factors that may impact these disparities. Several HIV prevention interventions that show promising progress and policy implications are discussed. Dr. Sutton also reviews policy issues as they relate to HIV disparities.

Year Launched: 2013

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

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Healthy Food Access in Urban Areas: Barriers and Solutions

Organization that developed training: Johns Hopkins University

Description: This Grand Rounds presentation describes the availability of healthy food in urban areas and discusses barriers to finding healthy food available for purchase in urban areas. This archived webcast features two speakers: Holly Freishtat, CN, MS, the Food Policy Director at the Baltimore Office of Sustainability, and Anne Palmer, MA, the Program Director of Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.

Year Launched: 2012

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

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Health Equity: A Public Health Essential

Organization that developed training: Empire State Public Health Training Center

Description: How healthy we are when we are born, how likely we are to get sick as we age, and how long we can expect to live are all determined to a surprising extent by our place in society. Disparities in health among income, racial, and ethnic groups in the U.S. are significant and, by many measures, expanding. This course serves as a primer for illustrating the root causes that shape health and health disparities. In addition to describing the complex interplay of social conditions associated with health disparities, it also provides a framework for exploring public and community health frameworks for addressing health equity.

At the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Describe terms related to health equity.
  • Identify how historically major advances in health status resulted from broad-based social reforms.
  • Identify the health outcomes of affected populations.
  • Describe the social determinants of health and how they contribute to health disparities and inequities.
  • Describe the Healthy People 2020 approaches to address health inequity.
  • Illustrate the role of the public health workforce in addressing health inequity.
  • Describe evidenced-based approaches to addressing health equity

Year Launched: 2012

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

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Health and Society

Organization that developed training: HarvardX

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the major social variables—social class, race, gender, poverty, income distribution, social networks/support, community cohesion, the work and neighborhood environment—that affect population health. The course covers the theoretical underpinnings of each construct (e.g. “race” as a social category), and surveys the empirical research linking each to population health status. Methods are introduced to operationalize each construct for the purposes of empirical application in epidemiological research.

Year Launched: 2013

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

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Community-Based Participatory Research to Reduce Cancer Disparities: Promise & Pitfalls

Organization that developed training: Michigan Public Health Training Center

Description: This talk provides an in-depth discussion of lessons learned from community-based participatory research conducted by a 12-year academic-community partnership (Deep South Network for Cancer Control) to reduce cancer health disparities in Alabama and Mississippi. The talk is intended to generate discussion about both the advantages and challenges of conducting this work as we seek effective and sustainable solutions to ensure health equity.

Objectives:

  • Recognize linkages between institutional oppression and health inequalities
  • Explain the rationale for explicit attention to addressing underlying racism, sexism and classism to eliminate health inequities
  • Identify the potential for dialogue about issues related to oppression and social justice to increase health equity

Year Launched: 2012

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Heath Professionals

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Community Change in Public Health

Organization that developed training: Johns Hopkins University

Description: In bringing about behavior change in public health, we often focus on the individual mother, student, or farmer. We should not forget the community structure and norms constrain for encouraging individual health behaviors. This course examines the community context of the changes needed to promote the public’s health. We begin by examining the various definitions of ‘community’ and the processes by which we ‘diagnose’ or seek to understand the structure and characteristics of different types of communities. An appreciation of community similarities and differences is necessary lest we fall into the trap of designing one-size-fits-all interventions. We need to recognize that no matter that outsiders may view a community as poor or neglected, we can find strengths and capacities for improvement in each community. Identifying community capacities and resources is the first step in facilitating community change. Different practical and philosophical approaches to change and therefore, examined. Specific to the change process is our recognition of the need for communities to participate in the design, implementation and evaluation of any intervention. We examine the concept of participation in an effort to see how different levels of involvement may affect sustainability of community change efforts. Finally a case study of a community participatory approach to onchocerciasis control in Africa is presented. Community Directed Intervention has subsequently been successfully applied to providing other essential primary health care services by and in the community, such as insecticide treated bednets, malaria treatment, vitamin A distribution, deworming medicines, and pneumonia and diarrhea case management.

Year Launched: 2013

Recommended for: Public Health Foundation-defined Tier 1 Public Health Professionals

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