Public Media Data for Public Health

Presenter:
Dr. Joe Smyser, PhD
CEO of the Public Goods ProjectsSmyser Headshot

Description:

This webinar explores new ways to use public media data to solve large, complex public health issues like opioid abuse and mental health. Dr. Joe Smyser explains how the Public Good Projects uses data from Facebook, Google, and designated market areas (DMAs) to create insights about a population’s health knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs in real time to inform public health media campaigns. Participants of this webinar will be exposed to case studies of how this data was used to create tailored messages for specific populations about opioids and mental health using digital marketing principles.

Course Objectives:

  1. Describe public media data available for disease surveillance
  2. Describe public media data available for audience segmentation
  3. Describe public media data available for message design and tailoring

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A2, 1A4, 1A5, 1A7, 1B4, 1C4, 2A5, 2A6, 2A12, 2B5, 5A2, 6A4, 6A5, 6B5, 8A2, 8B2

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Health Disparities in HIV: Supporting Adolescents through the Care Continuum

Presenter:Tanner_Headshot
Amanda Tanner
Associate Professor
University of North Carolina – Greensboro

Description:

This webinar explores the specific challenges associated with ensuring adolescents are able to access HIV screening and treatment. Dr. Amanda Tanner provides background on adolescent’s biological, cognitive, social, and legal changes as they progress to adulthood as well as the disparities of HIV diagnosis and care among adolescents, especially minority youth. This presentation continues with an overview of two studies that investigate care linkage and engagement for youth with newly diagnosed HIV as well as the HIV-related healthcare transition at adolescent clinics. Dr. Tanner provides recommendations for future interventions that will help adolescents know their HIV status, become linked with appropriate care, and maintain viral suppression.

Course Objectives:

  1. Define the adolescent specific HIV-related health disparities in the United States.
  2. Describe the individual and structural level factors impeding youth’s progress through the HIV Care Continuum.
  3. Identify potential individual and structural level intervention points to support the health of youth living with HIV.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1B1, 1C1, 5A2, 5A3, 6B4, 6C4, 8A3, 8A5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

The City Health Dashboard: A New Resource for Population Health Improvement

Presenter:Headshots_SLevine
Shoshanna Levine, MPH, DrPH
Program Director
City Health Dashboard

Description:

Over two-thirds of the U.S. population lives in cities. There is currently a shift for city governments to work with multi-level stakeholders to use a population health approach to target social determinants of health and improve the overall quality and health of the population. Dr. Soshanna Levine discusses the importance of using data as a cross-sectional, collaborative health improvement approach. The Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Medical Center and the Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service at NYU partnered with national networks to create the City Health Dashboard to help cities understand, compare, and take action to improve the health of their municipalities. The tool uses data from federal, state, and local agencies to present 36 measures linked to the health status across five domains (health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors, physical environment, health outcomes). The dashboard is a health improvement planning resource for 500 cities across the U.S. and will also provide evidence-based interventions and resources to city leadership, government, and stakeholders. Dr. Levine presents an overview of the dashboard and methods to engage local communities in data-driven health improvement activities.

Course Objectives:

  1. Describe the role of data in improving population health in urban areas
  2. Describe how data on health status and health determinants improve cross-sector collaboration and decision making around health
  3. Explain how the City Health Dashboard can be improved to be a more effective tool for health improvement

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A4, 1A6, 1A11, 1A12, 1B1, 1B4, 1B6, 1B11, 1B12, 1C1, 1C4, 1C6, 1C11, 1C12, 6A6, 6B7, 6C7

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

 

Addressing Unconscious Bias in our Language

Presenter:
Anne Marie Liebel, EdDAMLphoto
Founder and President
Health Communication Partners LLC

Description:

As health professionals, it is critical that we reflect and address unconscious bias in our language, especially when working with patient populations. Dr. Anne Marie Liebel discusses how uttering subtle microaggressions can have a cumulative negative effect on health and wellness. Dr. Liebel presents research on the linkages between microaggressions and health disparities. In particular, microaggressions from healthcare providers can negatively impact patient health related behaviors and utilization of health services. Thus, as we recognize our own microaggressions, Dr. Liebel provides individual and organizational strategies to examine, expand, and alter language to provide more equitable care and services.

Course Objectives:

  1. Evaluate your thoughts or behaviors for unconscious bias
  2. Explain ways that language use can intentionally or unintentionally contribute to health disparities
  3. Describe ways that your organization can work to examine, expand, and alter language regarding patients and clients to provide more equitable care and services

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A2, 3A3, 3A6, 3A7, 3B2, 3B3, 3B6, 3B7, 3C2, 3C3, 3C6, 3C7, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

#NYCHealthEquity – Advancing Racial and Social Justice

Presenter:KAM_StandardPhoto
Aletha Maybank, MD, MPH
Deputy Commissioner
NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Center for Health Equity

Description:

For one to have a true commitment to health equity, it is critical to engage with the political, social, and historical context of structural racism within our society. The history of slavery and segregation is deeply embedded within public policies which has fostered neighborhood underdevelopment, increased incarceration rates, and health disparities among minority and ethnic populations. Dr. Aletha Maybank, Deputy Commissioner and Founding Director of the Center for Health Equity at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) discusses the work of the Center for Health Equity to decrease health disparities and create an equitable and thriving city for all. The DOHMH and Center for Health Equity use a racial justice lense to build organizational capacity to advance racial equity through data visualization, community engagement, neighborhood investment, and public policy. Dr. Maybank discusses a neighborhood place-based approach which leverages past public health practices by implementing evidence-based interventions to provide coordinated health promotion services, clinical services, and community resources to increase community access to goods and services and close coverage gaps. Dr. Maybank discusses the importance of working with sister agencies to advance the health equity agenda and emphasizes the importance of multi-sectoral partnerships to promote community change.

Course Objectives:

  1. Describe the roles institutions have played in fostering, exacerbating and perpetuating racism and other forms of oppression
  2. List the ways institutions can work with neighborhoods and communities to amplify their inherent power to heal together
  3. Describe the role public health practitioners have in leveraging their power and privilege to embolden larger movements and coalitions seeking to name injustice and liberate oppressed groups

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

2A5, 2A6, 2A7, 2B5, 2B6, 2B7, 2C5, 2C6, 2B7, 2C10, 3A8, 3B8, 38C, 4A2, 4A5, 4A6, 4B2, 4B5, 4B6, 4C2, 4C5, 4C6, 8A4, 8B4, 8B10, 8C4, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Engaging Across Sectors and Disciplines to Build Community and Capacity for Health Equity

Presenter:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCLRenata Pic
Founding President and Board of Director Member, Health Equity Initiative
Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Description:

Disparities in health and healthcare are connected to population health and affect the delivery, access and quality of care, especially for vulnerable populations. There are social determinants (i.e. housing, built environment, age) that can negatively affect health outcomes.  Dr. Renata Schiavo, Founding President of the Health Equity Initiative (HEI), discusses how professionals across sectors and disciplines can collaborate to build healthier communities. The term health equity is defined and framed as a human rights and social justice issue that will provide individuals with the same opportunities to stay healthy and cope with crises, regardless of socioeconomic factors and other social determinants. Regardless of status, Dr. Schiavo views health equity as a priority for all and uses case studies to exemplify how multi-sector partnerships can effectively mobilize communities to reduce health disparities and healthcare costs. By working with communities and using community engagement approaches, these multi-sector partnerships can foster community ownership and sustainability of health innovations. Dr. Schiavo also provides methods and strategies to bring multidisciplinary stakeholders together in order to develop sustainable, equitable solutions.

Course Objectives:

  1. Define community
  2. Engage in multi-sectoral partnerships and interventions for health equity
  3. Implement strategies within your organization to advance health equity

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A8, 3B8, 38C, 4A1, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4B1, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4C1, 4C3, 4C5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Socio-structural factors, health disparities, and the uptake of biomedical HIV prevention for Black Men who have Sex with Men (MSM)

Presenter:mp3243
Morgan Philbin, PhD, MHS
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Description:

Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are at significantly higher risk of HIV. This is due to a complex interplay between socio-structural factors and their own intersectional identities. In this webinar, Dr Philbin describes her ethnographic study examining how factors at all levels of the social-ecological model shape healthcare behavior for black MSM and how they access PreP, as well as her sub-study about structural barriers to access. Some of these barriers included misunderstanding about PreP’s effectiveness and side-effects, concerns that it would decrease others’ condom use, distrust in the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare providers, precarious housing, the structure of the labor market, gendered healthcare systems, institutional and normative gender rules, and stigma. Dr Philbin highlights the importance of reducing barriers at all levels, particularly at the structural level in areas of stigma, employment, and housing. The implications include the need to eliminate the relationship between employment and access to healthcare, enacting policies that regulate shift work (scheduling and pay), creating clinical spaces that welcome all types of men, and expanding the PreP Assistance Program.

Course Objectives:

1) Describe how factors not directly related to biomedical HIV prevention (e.g., the labor market, law enforcement, gendered expectations) influence how Black MSM approach HIV prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis.

2) Give examples of how factors across multiple levels (e.g., structural, community, interpersonal) impact how Black MSM engage with biomedical HIV prevention.

3) Describe what types of multi-level approaches might facilitate Black MSM’s uptake of PrEP. Describe how can we balance the development of more proximate interventions (e.g., education campaigns) with large scale interventions (e.g., expanding insurance access) that might have a larger impact.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

2B8, 3A8, 4A2, 4A3, 4A4, 4A6

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Engaging Communities in the Research Process to Enhance Outcomes and Sustainability: Practical Strategies for Researchers and Public Health Practitioners

Presenter:
Carly Hutchinson, MA, PhD
Lecturer, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
Director of Communications & Community Relations, Harlem Health Promotion Center

Description:

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a research method that equitably involves all community and academic partners in every step of designing and conducting research. CBPR allows community members to research a topic that is important to them and improves their health. This course provides practical strategies to help people engage in a more successful way with communities using CBPR. CBPR is successful because of the relevancy of a co-developed research project and greater community buy-in, both of which lead to better outcomes and sustainability.

Dr. Hutchinson describes the Community Engagement Continuum for the various ways in which researchers can involve communities in their research, and provides two case studies for how this has been done.  She gives further tips on how to get started trying CBPR and makes a strong case for its value.

Course Objectives:

  • Name the different levels of community engagement that researchers can participate in.
  • Describe the importance of understanding and involving the communities you are researching.
  • Define cultural humility.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A3, 3B3, 3C3, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4C3, 4C5, 5A3, 5A4, 5A10, 5B3, 5C3, 8A3

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Achieving Health Equity through Community Control of Budgets

Presenter:
Jennifer Godzeno, MSUP, MPH, AICPGodzeno Headshot
Deputy Director, Participatory Budgeting Project
Culture of Health Leader, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Description:

Participatory budgeting involves community members in deciding what to do with a given budget.  It is a powerful tool used globally to increase community engagement and shift from “indirect” to “direct” democracy. Its impacts include encouraging a more responsive government, giving voices to community members who otherwise may be ineligible to vote in standard elections, and has even been linked to a 30% reduction in under-5 mortality in communities in Brazil that adopted the practice. Jennifer Godenzo discusses how it applies to the “ladder of participation” by giving citizens control and is thus equitable, empowering, and focuses on the social determinants of health.  She explains the five steps of participatory budgeting: design a process with the community, brainstorm ideas, develop proposals, cast a vote, and fund winning projects.  She also gives examples of where participatory budgeting has been used, from high schools in Phoenix, AZ to citywide community garden projects in Vallejo, CA to within organizations, such as hospitals and foundations.

Course Objectives:

  • Name the characteristics of public engagement practices that offer community control to historically underrepresented and under-resourced communities
  • Describe how participatory budgeting has impacted health outcomes and social determinants of health in the US and internationally
  • Describe opportunities to integrate data-informed community engagement practices into the allocation of health-focused funds and/or budgets that influence the social determinants of health

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

2A2, 3A3, 3A8, 3B3, 4A4, 4A5, 4B4, 4C4, 5A3, 5A5, 5A6, 5A10, 5B8, 5C8, 7A5, 7A10, 7C5, 8A3, 8B3, 8C3

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Caring for Vulnerable Populations in School Health

Presenter:
Natalie Mathurin, MD, MPH
Medical Director at Student Health Services, School District of Philadelphia
&
Cheryl Lawrence, MD
Medical Director at the Office of School Health-Family & Child Health, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Description:

Dr. Mathurin and Dr. Lawrence describe the purpose and goals of programs developed to aid children that belong to vulnerable populations using the New York City Department of Health as a case study. The beginning of the presentation considers data about vulnerable populations in New York City and why it is important to address health of children in these populations. The presenters then present the mission, objectives, frameworks, and activities of programs to care for students in vulnerable populations.

Course Objectives:

  • Describe how vulnerable populations are identified in the school setting.
  • Give examples of the issues (medical, mental, social) commonly faced by students in vulnerable populations.
  • List methods to increase community and school involvement in the care of students in vulnerable populations.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1A4, 1A5, 1A9, 1A10, 1A11, 1B1, 1B3, 1B4, 1B10, 1B11, 1B12, 1B14, 1C1, 1C4, 1C10, 1C14, 2A2, 2A7, 2A8, 2B2, 2B6, 2B8, 2B9, 3A2, 3A4, 3A5, 3A6, 3A7, 3A8, 3B2, 3B4, 3B5, 3B6, 3B7, 3B8, 3C2, 3C5, 3C7, 3C8, 4A4, 4A6, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5A5, 5A6, 5A7, 5A8, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5B6, 5B7, 5B8, 5B9, 5B10, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5, 6A4, 6A6, 6A8, 6B4, 6B5, 6B7, 6B9, 6C5, 6C9, 7A2, 7A4, 7A13, 8A1, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8A6, 8B1, 8B2, 8B6, 8C1, 8C2

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).