Addressing Unconscious Bias in our Language

Presenter:
Anne Marie Liebel, EdDAMLphoto
Founder and President
Health Communication Partners LLC

Description:

As health professionals, it is critical that we reflect and address unconscious bias in our language, especially when working with patient populations. Dr. Anne Marie Liebel discusses how uttering subtle microaggressions can have a cumulative negative effect on health and wellness. Dr. Liebel presents research on the linkages between microaggressions and health disparities. In particular, microaggressions from healthcare providers can negatively impact patient health related behaviors and utilization of health services. Thus, as we recognize our own microaggressions, Dr. Liebel provides individual and organizational strategies to examine, expand, and alter language to provide more equitable care and services.

Course Objectives:

  1. Evaluate your thoughts or behaviors for unconscious bias
  2. Explain ways that language use can intentionally or unintentionally contribute to health disparities
  3. Describe ways that your organization can work to examine, expand, and alter language regarding patients and clients to provide more equitable care and services

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A2, 3A3, 3A6, 3A7, 3B2, 3B3, 3B6, 3B7, 3C2, 3C3, 3C6, 3C7, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Data-Based Decision-Making Using Data to Intervene for Maternal and Child Health – Part Two in a Series

Course Description:

The purpose of this training is to inform public health professionals how to use data to shape needs assessments, develop public health programs, and provide a framework for program evaluation. In Part Two of this series, learners will take advantage of readily available data sources to explore interventions and programs to address public health issues in maternal and child health using Columbia County, NY as a case study.

Course Objectives:

  1.     Identify sources of evidence-based interventions/promising practices.
  2.     Define and develop SMART objectives, for outcome evaluation.
  3.     Use progress and outcome measures in program monitoring and evaluation.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

  • Competency Domains: Analytical/Assessment, Program Planning, Communication, Basic Public Health Sciences
  • Specific competencies:

1A1, 1A2, 1A4, 1A7, 1A9, 1A10, 1A12, 1A13, 1A14, 1B1, 1B2, 1B4, 1B7, 1B9, 1B10, 1B12, 1B14, 1C1, 1C2, 1C4, 1C7, 1C9, 1C10, 1C12, 1C14, 2A5, 2A6, 2A12, 2B5, 2B12, 3A5, 3B5, 3C5, 6A3, 6A4, 6A6, 6B3, 6B5, 6B7, 6C3, 6C5, 6C7

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Data-Based Decision-Making Using Data to Intervene for Maternal and Child Health – Part One in a Series

Course Description:

The purpose of this training is to inform public health professionals how to use data to shape needs assessments, develop public health programs, and provide a framework for program evaluation. In Part One of this series, learners will take advantage of readily available data sources to begin planning and implementing a successful health program related to issues in maternal and child health using Columbia County, NY as a case study.

Course Objectives:

  1. Identify and locate sources of Maternal and Child Health data in New York State, at state, county, and sub-county levels.
  2. Use descriptive epidemiology (person, place, and time) in needs assessment and program targeting.
  3. Use data to identify high-risk populations in population for program targeting.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

  • Competency Domains: Analytical/Assessment, Program Planning, Communication, Basic Public Health Sciences
  • Specific competencies:

1A1, 1A2, 1A4, 1A7, 1A9, 1A10, 1A12, 1A13, 1A14, 1B1, 1B2, 1B4, 1B7, 1B9, 1B10, 1B12, 1B14, 1C1, 1C2, 1C4, 1C7, 1C9, 1C10, 1C12, 1C14, 2A5, 2A6, 2A12, 2B5, 2B12, 3A5, 3B5, 3C5, 6A3, 6A4, 6A6, 6B3, 6B5, 6B7, 6C3, 6C5, 6C7

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

 

Engaging Across Sectors and Disciplines to Build Community and Capacity for Health Equity

Presenter:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCLRenata Pic
Founding President and Board of Director Member, Health Equity Initiative
Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Description:

Disparities in health and healthcare are connected to population health and affect the delivery, access and quality of care, especially for vulnerable populations. There are social determinants (i.e. housing, built environment, age) that can negatively affect health outcomes.  Dr. Renata Schiavo, Founding President of the Health Equity Initiative (HEI), discusses how professionals across sectors and disciplines can collaborate to build healthier communities. The term health equity is defined and framed as a human rights and social justice issue that will provide individuals with the same opportunities to stay healthy and cope with crises, regardless of socioeconomic factors and other social determinants. Regardless of status, Dr. Schiavo views health equity as a priority for all and uses case studies to exemplify how multi-sector partnerships can effectively mobilize communities to reduce health disparities and healthcare costs. By working with communities and using community engagement approaches, these multi-sector partnerships can foster community ownership and sustainability of health innovations. Dr. Schiavo also provides methods and strategies to bring multidisciplinary stakeholders together in order to develop sustainable, equitable solutions.

Course Objectives:

  1. Define community
  2. Engage in multi-sectoral partnerships and interventions for health equity
  3. Implement strategies within your organization to advance health equity

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A8, 3B8, 38C, 4A1, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4B1, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4C1, 4C3, 4C5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Grow a Healthy Public Food Sector

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support food policy changes in their communities to encourage healthy food systems. The session begins with a discussion of why the public sector should be involved in developing policies around food and how local health agencies can lead the charge. Next, learners will learn about food system goals that can promote health and how to achieve those goals. Finally, learners will explore case studies that demonstrate how public health agencies have planned and implemented changes to their food systems.

Course Objectives:

  1. Explain and define the scope of the public, the private (market) and the non-profit (civil society) sectors in making healthy food more available and affordable.
  2. Identify the various functions that the public sector plays in making healthy food available and affordable including: procurement, institutional food, taxation, enforcing  food safety standards, regulating retail food outlets and restaurants , and providing food benefits(e.g., SNAP,WIC and school food).
  3. Distinguish roles of local, state and federal governments in public sector food and identify food-related responsibilities of various government sectors including health, education, agriculture, environmental protection, economic development, zoning and land use, and consumer protection.
  4. Describe innovative practices, policies and programs of state and local health departments in supporting public sector initiatives to increase access to healthy affordable food and reduce racial/ethnic, socioeconomic and other inequalities in diet-related diseases.
  5. Describe governance mechanisms for engaging citizens, social movements, advocacy groups and others in using the public sector to shape healthier food environments.
  6. Assess the scope and strengths and weaknesses of their own health department’s food portfolio and identify ways their department could use existing resources and mandates to strengthen the public sector’s role in making healthy food more affordable and accessible.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A11, 1B1, 1C1, 2A2, 2A5, 2A6, 2A7, 2B2, 2B6, 2B7, 2B8, 2C2, 2C6, 3A8, 3B8, 3C8, 4A3, 4A4, 4A6, 4B3, 4C3, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5B1, 5B2, 5B3, 5C1, 5C2, 5C3

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Use Countermarketing to Address Tobacco, Alcohol and Unhealthy Food

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support the use of countermarketing strategies to reduce demand for tobacco, alcohol and processed foods high in sugar, salt and unhealthy fats. The session begins with a discussion of countermarketing as a public health strategy for reducing the use of tobacco, alcohol, and unhealthy food. Next, learners will explore the elements of countermarketing campaigns, and look at two health departments that have used them successfully. Finally, learners will apply these strategies to think through a hypothetical countermarketing campaign, and plan how you might use them in your own work.

Course Objectives:

  1. Summarize evidence on the impact of tobacco countermarketing on the initiation of smoking among young adults.
  2. Explain why lessons from evidence-based tobacco counter marketing could be effective for countermarketing alcohol and unhealthy food.
  3. Identify and describe at least five elements of effective tobacco countermarketing campaigns and explain their relevance to countermarketing unhealthy food and alcohol.
  4. Describe at least three roles that state and local health departments can play in countermarketing tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy food (e.g., creating and/or funding public countermarketing campaigns, funding community and youth groups to develop and launch campaigns, training on countermarketing strategies, convening organizations involved in countermarketing).
  5. Describe two specific local or state initiatives designed to support countermarketing of tobacco, alcohol or unhealthy food that have been used in other jurisdictions that could be applied in participant’s own setting.
  6. Explain how LHDs can leverage “upstream” strategies, including partnering with social movements and community organizations and expanding democratic participation, to support the design and implementation of these initiatives.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A7, 1A9, 1B1, 1C1, 2A2, 2A6, 2B2, 2B6, 2B8, 2C2, 3A3, 3A4, 3A5, 3A6, 3B3, 3B4, 3B5, 3B6, 3C5, 4A3, 4A5, 4B3, 5A2

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Protect the Health of Immigrants

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support health care, social services, and public health programs to protect the health of immigrants. This session begins with an introduction to immigration policy and its relationship to health as well as local strategies to protect immigrant health. Next, learns will explore three case studies that highlight real policy changes governments have implemented to create more immigrant inclusive communities. During these case studies, learners will have time to reflect on ways their organization can partner with government agencies to support immigration health.

Course Objectives:

  1. Describe evidence documenting major health challenges facing immigrants in the United States
  2. Explain the pathways by which immigration policy can influence the health of immigrant populations
  3. Identify specific strategies that state and local health agencies can adopt to improve health for immigrant populations
  4. Describe at least three specific local or state initiatives designed to improve the health of immigrant populations that could be adapted to the participant’s community
  5. Explain how LHDs can leverage “upstream” strategies, including partnering with other agencies, social movements and community organizations, to design implement these initiative

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A11, 1A12, 1B1, 1B11, 1B12, 1C1, 1C11, 1C12, 2A2, 2A5, 2A6, 2A7, 2B2, 2B5, 2B6, 2B7, 2C2 , 2C5, 2C6, 3A3, 3A7, 3A8, 3B3, 3B7, 3B8, 3C3, 3C7, 3C8, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4B3, 4B4 , 4B5, 4B6, 4C3, 4C4, 4C5, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5B1, 5B3, 5B9, 5C1, 5C3, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8B2, 8B3, 8B10, 8C2, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Syndemics y VIH entre hombres que tienen relaciones sexuales con hombres (HSH) en los Estados Unidos: Entendiendo el riesgo en el contexto

Presentador: Patrick Wilson, PhD, MA
Profesor Asociado, Ciencias Sociomédicas, Universidad de Columbia Mailman School of Public Health

Fecha: 5 de mayo de 2015

Descripción: Syndemics ofrece un marco útil a través del cual podemos potencialmente explicar el aumento del riesgo de VIH entre HSH en que describe la “agrupación” de diferentes epidemias fisiológicas y sociológicas por persona, lugar o tiempo. El Dr. Patrick Wilson discute el problema del VIH en nuestro propio país, donde la prevalencia del VIH en las comunidades afroamericanas y latinas es alta y donde la epidemia de VIH tiende a aumentar en HSH en los Estados Unidos. Este seminario web examina cómo observar y enfocar los factores conductuales, sociales y estructurales que influyen en las disparidades en la epidemia del VIH en HSH en blancos y negros, puede ayudar a abordar dichas disparidades en formas abiertas y desencolares.

 

Lectura pre-webinar recomendada:
Wilson, P.A., Nanin, J, Wallace, S., Cherenack, E.M., Fullilove, R. (2014). Uso de la teoría sindémica para entender la vulnerabilidad a la infección por el VIH entre hombres negros y latinos en la ciudad de Nueva York. Revista de Salud Urbana, 9 (5), 983-998. Artículo de Patrick Wilson

Preguntas de Reflexión: ¿Qué es un síndrome? ¿Cuáles son los conceptos claves del síndrome que afecta a los HSH negros y latinos en los Estados Unidos? ¿Cómo el concepto de syndemics aumenta nuestra capacidad de describir e intervenir sobre las disparidades en el VIH / SIDA que afectan a los HSH de color en los Estados Unidos?

Council on Linkages Competencias básicas para profesionales de la salud pública (versión 2014)

  • Dominio de Competencia Primaria: Habilidades de Comunicación
  • Competencias específicas: 1A1, 1B1, 1C1, 1A6, 1B6, 1C6, 2A7, 2B7, 2C7, 3A1, 3B1, 3C1, 3A5, 3B5, 3C5, 3A7, 3B7, 3C1, 3A8, 3B8, 3C8, 4A2, 4B2, 4C2, 4A3, 4B3, 4C3, 5A2, 5B2, 5C2, 5A7, 5B7, 5C7, 6A4, 6B5, 6C5, 6A5, 6B6, 6C6

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Think Cultural Health

Offers the latest resources, including free and accredited continuing education programs, and tools for providers to promote cultural and linguistic competency in health care. Developed by the Office of Minority Health.

This is also an additional resource listed for the New York New Jersey Public Health Training Center learning modules:

https://www.thinkculturalhealth.hhs.gov

CDC Tools for Cross-Cultural Communication and Language Access Can Help Organizations Address Health Literacy and Improve Communication Effectiveness

This site offers tools to support and develop health communication that recognizes and bridges cultural differences.

This is also an additional resource listed for the New York New Jersey Public Health Training Center learning modules:

http://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/culture.html