Strategies to Advance Health Equity: State and Local Health Departments’ Role in Improving Food Access among Immigrants

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

There are currently more than 40 million immigrants living in the US, contributing to our society as workers, taxpayers, caretakers, and neighbors. Many of these immigrants are more likely to be poor than US-born people because of cultural, language, and legal barriers that influence their living and working conditions and access to services. One consequence of this poverty is food insecurity, or not having enough healthy food, which has serious implications for health. As public health professionals, we work to prevent harm and reduce health inequities. When members of our communities struggle to access healthy food, they are at risk for health problems. But they are also limited in their ability to contribute meaningfully to society, which affects all of us. To meet our national health goals, local health departments must work to ensure that everyone in our communities has the opportunities and resources they need for good health – regardless of immigration status.

In this module, participants will:

  • Explore specific challenges immigrants may face in accessing healthy food at the individual, organizational, and policy levels
  • Consider real-world examples of how local health departments can partner with other agencies, community organizations, and activists to overcome these barriers and help immigrants access healthy, affordable food for themselves and their families
  • Strategize about how to adopt similar initiatives in their community and organization

Course Objectives:

  1. Explain the rationale for expanding public health practice to promote health and equity by supporting immigrant access to healthy, affordable food
  2. List the major public anti-hunger programs and summarize the eligibility rules that apply to different legal categories of immigrants
  3. Describe how individual beliefs, organizational practices, and policies contribute to inequitable access to healthy food and public food benefits between immigrant and US-born populations
  4. Explain at least two specific local or state Health Department initiatives designed to improve access to healthy food and food benefits among immigrant populations that could be adapted to the participant’s community
  5. Explain how local health departments can leverage “upstream” strategies, including partnering with other agencies, social movements and community organizations, to protect and expand immigrant access to food benefits and services

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

Primary Competency Domain:  Community Dimensions of Practice

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I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

 

Health Disparities in HIV: Supporting Adolescents through the Care Continuum

Presenter:Tanner_Headshot
Amanda Tanner
Associate Professor
University of North Carolina – Greensboro

Description:

This webinar explores the specific challenges associated with ensuring adolescents are able to access HIV screening and treatment. Dr. Amanda Tanner provides background on adolescent’s biological, cognitive, social, and legal changes as they progress to adulthood as well as the disparities of HIV diagnosis and care among adolescents, especially minority youth. This presentation continues with an overview of two studies that investigate care linkage and engagement for youth with newly diagnosed HIV as well as the HIV-related healthcare transition at adolescent clinics. Dr. Tanner provides recommendations for future interventions that will help adolescents know their HIV status, become linked with appropriate care, and maintain viral suppression.

Course Objectives:

  1. Define the adolescent specific HIV-related health disparities in the United States.
  2. Describe the individual and structural level factors impeding youth’s progress through the HIV Care Continuum.
  3. Identify potential individual and structural level intervention points to support the health of youth living with HIV.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1B1, 1C1, 5A2, 5A3, 6B4, 6C4, 8A3, 8A5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Addressing Unconscious Bias in our Language

Presenter:
Anne Marie Liebel, EdDAMLphoto
Founder and President
Health Communication Partners LLC

Description:

As health professionals, it is critical that we reflect and address unconscious bias in our language, especially when working with patient populations. Dr. Anne Marie Liebel discusses how uttering subtle microaggressions can have a cumulative negative effect on health and wellness. Dr. Liebel presents research on the linkages between microaggressions and health disparities. In particular, microaggressions from healthcare providers can negatively impact patient health related behaviors and utilization of health services. Thus, as we recognize our own microaggressions, Dr. Liebel provides individual and organizational strategies to examine, expand, and alter language to provide more equitable care and services.

Course Objectives:

  1. Evaluate your thoughts or behaviors for unconscious bias
  2. Explain ways that language use can intentionally or unintentionally contribute to health disparities
  3. Describe ways that your organization can work to examine, expand, and alter language regarding patients and clients to provide more equitable care and services

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A2, 3A3, 3A6, 3A7, 3B2, 3B3, 3B6, 3B7, 3C2, 3C3, 3C6, 3C7, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Grow a Healthy Public Food Sector

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support food policy changes in their communities to encourage healthy food systems. The session begins with a discussion of why the public sector should be involved in developing policies around food and how local health agencies can lead the charge. Next, learners will learn about food system goals that can promote health and how to achieve those goals. Finally, learners will explore case studies that demonstrate how public health agencies have planned and implemented changes to their food systems.

Course Objectives:

  1. Explain and define the scope of the public, the private (market) and the non-profit (civil society) sectors in making healthy food more available and affordable.
  2. Identify the various functions that the public sector plays in making healthy food available and affordable including: procurement, institutional food, taxation, enforcing  food safety standards, regulating retail food outlets and restaurants , and providing food benefits(e.g., SNAP,WIC and school food).
  3. Distinguish roles of local, state and federal governments in public sector food and identify food-related responsibilities of various government sectors including health, education, agriculture, environmental protection, economic development, zoning and land use, and consumer protection.
  4. Describe innovative practices, policies and programs of state and local health departments in supporting public sector initiatives to increase access to healthy affordable food and reduce racial/ethnic, socioeconomic and other inequalities in diet-related diseases.
  5. Describe governance mechanisms for engaging citizens, social movements, advocacy groups and others in using the public sector to shape healthier food environments.
  6. Assess the scope and strengths and weaknesses of their own health department’s food portfolio and identify ways their department could use existing resources and mandates to strengthen the public sector’s role in making healthy food more affordable and accessible.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A11, 1B1, 1C1, 2A2, 2A5, 2A6, 2A7, 2B2, 2B6, 2B7, 2B8, 2C2, 2C6, 3A8, 3B8, 3C8, 4A3, 4A4, 4A6, 4B3, 4C3, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5B1, 5B2, 5B3, 5C1, 5C2, 5C3

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Use Countermarketing to Address Tobacco, Alcohol and Unhealthy Food

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support the use of countermarketing strategies to reduce demand for tobacco, alcohol and processed foods high in sugar, salt and unhealthy fats. The session begins with a discussion of countermarketing as a public health strategy for reducing the use of tobacco, alcohol, and unhealthy food. Next, learners will explore the elements of countermarketing campaigns, and look at two health departments that have used them successfully. Finally, learners will apply these strategies to think through a hypothetical countermarketing campaign, and plan how you might use them in your own work.

Course Objectives:

  1. Summarize evidence on the impact of tobacco countermarketing on the initiation of smoking among young adults.
  2. Explain why lessons from evidence-based tobacco counter marketing could be effective for countermarketing alcohol and unhealthy food.
  3. Identify and describe at least five elements of effective tobacco countermarketing campaigns and explain their relevance to countermarketing unhealthy food and alcohol.
  4. Describe at least three roles that state and local health departments can play in countermarketing tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy food (e.g., creating and/or funding public countermarketing campaigns, funding community and youth groups to develop and launch campaigns, training on countermarketing strategies, convening organizations involved in countermarketing).
  5. Describe two specific local or state initiatives designed to support countermarketing of tobacco, alcohol or unhealthy food that have been used in other jurisdictions that could be applied in participant’s own setting.
  6. Explain how LHDs can leverage “upstream” strategies, including partnering with social movements and community organizations and expanding democratic participation, to support the design and implementation of these initiatives.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A7, 1A9, 1B1, 1C1, 2A2, 2A6, 2B2, 2B6, 2B8, 2C2, 3A3, 3A4, 3A5, 3A6, 3B3, 3B4, 3B5, 3B6, 3C5, 4A3, 4A5, 4B3, 5A2

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Protect the Health of Immigrants

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support health care, social services, and public health programs to protect the health of immigrants. This session begins with an introduction to immigration policy and its relationship to health as well as local strategies to protect immigrant health. Next, learns will explore three case studies that highlight real policy changes governments have implemented to create more immigrant inclusive communities. During these case studies, learners will have time to reflect on ways their organization can partner with government agencies to support immigration health.

Course Objectives:

  1. Describe evidence documenting major health challenges facing immigrants in the United States
  2. Explain the pathways by which immigration policy can influence the health of immigrant populations
  3. Identify specific strategies that state and local health agencies can adopt to improve health for immigrant populations
  4. Describe at least three specific local or state initiatives designed to improve the health of immigrant populations that could be adapted to the participant’s community
  5. Explain how LHDs can leverage “upstream” strategies, including partnering with other agencies, social movements and community organizations, to design implement these initiative

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A11, 1A12, 1B1, 1B11, 1B12, 1C1, 1C11, 1C12, 2A2, 2A5, 2A6, 2A7, 2B2, 2B5, 2B6, 2B7, 2C2 , 2C5, 2C6, 3A3, 3A7, 3A8, 3B3, 3B7, 3B8, 3C3, 3C7, 3C8, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4B3, 4B4 , 4B5, 4B6, 4C3, 4C4, 4C5, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5B1, 5B3, 5B9, 5C1, 5C3, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8B2, 8B3, 8B10, 8C2, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Engaging Communities in the Research Process to Enhance Outcomes and Sustainability: Practical Strategies for Researchers and Public Health Practitioners

Presenter:
Carly Hutchinson, MA, PhD
Lecturer, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
Director of Communications & Community Relations, Harlem Health Promotion Center

Description:

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a research method that equitably involves all community and academic partners in every step of designing and conducting research. CBPR allows community members to research a topic that is important to them and improves their health. This course provides practical strategies to help people engage in a more successful way with communities using CBPR. CBPR is successful because of the relevancy of a co-developed research project and greater community buy-in, both of which lead to better outcomes and sustainability.

Dr. Hutchinson describes the Community Engagement Continuum for the various ways in which researchers can involve communities in their research, and provides two case studies for how this has been done.  She gives further tips on how to get started trying CBPR and makes a strong case for its value.

Course Objectives:

  • Name the different levels of community engagement that researchers can participate in.
  • Describe the importance of understanding and involving the communities you are researching.
  • Define cultural humility.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A3, 3B3, 3C3, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4C3, 4C5, 5A3, 5A4, 5A10, 5B3, 5C3, 8A3

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Achieving Health Equity through Community Control of Budgets

Presenter:
Jennifer Godzeno, MSUP, MPH, AICPGodzeno Headshot
Deputy Director, Participatory Budgeting Project
Culture of Health Leader, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Description:

Participatory budgeting involves community members in deciding what to do with a given budget.  It is a powerful tool used globally to increase community engagement and shift from “indirect” to “direct” democracy. Its impacts include encouraging a more responsive government, giving voices to community members who otherwise may be ineligible to vote in standard elections, and has even been linked to a 30% reduction in under-5 mortality in communities in Brazil that adopted the practice. Jennifer Godenzo discusses how it applies to the “ladder of participation” by giving citizens control and is thus equitable, empowering, and focuses on the social determinants of health.  She explains the five steps of participatory budgeting: design a process with the community, brainstorm ideas, develop proposals, cast a vote, and fund winning projects.  She also gives examples of where participatory budgeting has been used, from high schools in Phoenix, AZ to citywide community garden projects in Vallejo, CA to within organizations, such as hospitals and foundations.

Course Objectives:

  • Name the characteristics of public engagement practices that offer community control to historically underrepresented and under-resourced communities
  • Describe how participatory budgeting has impacted health outcomes and social determinants of health in the US and internationally
  • Describe opportunities to integrate data-informed community engagement practices into the allocation of health-focused funds and/or budgets that influence the social determinants of health

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

2A2, 3A3, 3A8, 3B3, 4A4, 4A5, 4B4, 4C4, 5A3, 5A5, 5A6, 5A10, 5B8, 5C8, 7A5, 7A10, 7C5, 8A3, 8B3, 8C3

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Case Management of Students with Asthma

Description:

This module (part of a series) was developed with content experts in the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Office of School Health. This learning module describes the four goals of case management and standards of care, when they should be intensified, how they can be applied to a school setting, and finally, how to build and maintain collaborations to improve health outcomes.

Learning Objectives:

  • Define nursing case management;
  • Explain the minimal standards of care for case managing all students with asthma;
  • Discuss criteria for intensifying case management in students with asthma;
  • Identify specific modifiable risk factors in asthma;
  • Describe specific interventions to modify risks and improve asthma mortality and morbidity.

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A11, 3A6, 3A8, 5A2, 5A3, 5A5, 8B4

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Supportive Housing to Address Social Determinants: Cross-sector Collaborations and Funding Possibilities

Presenter:kristen-miller-photo

Kristin Miller
Director
Corporation for Supportive Housing

Description:

In this webinar, Kristen Miller, Director of Corporation for Supportive Housing, discusses housing as a social determinant of health, describes supportive housing models, and provides examples of how to use data to identify and target individuals in need of supportive housing.

By attending this webinar, participants will:

  • Gain a better understanding of housing as a key social determinant and the impact housing interventions have had in healthcare outcomes and costs
  • Learn about strategies to effectively understand, target and define frequent user population for population health interventions
  • Identify key stakeholders to implement a frequent user initiative including key lessons learned, challenges and best practices

Reflection questions:

  • What is supportive housing is and for whom should it be targeted?
  • How can health departments and public health professionals contribute to local initiatives to address housing needs affecting the health of their most vulnerable residents?
  • What are opportunities to expand resources available to address prevention and health care needs of residents with housing challenges?

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1A4, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, A8, 1A9, 1A10, 1A11, 1A12, 1A13, 1A14, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5A5, 5A6, 5A7, 5A8, 5A9, 5A10, 7A1, 7A2, 7A3, 7A4, 7A5, 7A6, 7A7, 7A8, 7A9, 7A10, 7A11, 7A12, 7A13, 7A14, 8A1, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8A5, 8A6, 8A7, 8A8, 8A9

1B1, 1B2, 1B3, 1B4, 1B5, 1B5, 1B6, 1B7, 1B8, 1B9, 1B10, 1B11, 1B12, 1B13, 1B14, 1B1, 55B1, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5B6, 5B7, 5B8, 5B9, 5B10, 5B11, 7B1, 7B2, 7B3, 7B4, 7B5, 7B6, 7B7, 7B8, 7B9, 7B10, 7B11, 7B12, 7B13, 7B14, 7B15, 7B16, 8B1, 8B2, 8B3, 8B4, 8B5, 8B6, 8B7, 8B8, 8B9, 8B10

1C1, 1C2, 1C3, 1C4, 1C5, 1C6, 1C7, 1C8, 1C9, 1C10, 1C11, 1C12, 1C13, 1C14, 1C15, 5C1, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5, 5C6, 5C7, 5C8, 5C9, 5C10, 5C11, 7C1, 7C2, 7C3, 7C4, 7C5, 7C6, 7C7, 7C8, 7C9, 7C10, 7C11, 7C12, 7C13, 7C14, 7C15, 7C16, 8C1, 8C2, 8C3, 8C4, 8C5, 8C6, 8C7, 8C8, 8C9, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).