Engaging Across Sectors and Disciplines to Build Community and Capacity for Health Equity

Presenter:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCLRenata Pic
Founding President and Board of Director Member, Health Equity Initiative
Senior Lecturer, Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Description:

Disparities in health and healthcare are connected to population health and affect the delivery, access and quality of care, especially for vulnerable populations. There are social determinants (i.e. housing, built environment, age) that can negatively affect health outcomes.  Dr. Renata Schiavo, Founding President of the Health Equity Initiative (HEI), discusses how professionals across sectors and disciplines can collaborate to build healthier communities. The term health equity is defined and framed as a human rights and social justice issue that will provide individuals with the same opportunities to stay healthy and cope with crises, regardless of socioeconomic factors and other social determinants. Regardless of status, Dr. Schiavo views health equity as a priority for all and uses case studies to exemplify how multi-sector partnerships can effectively mobilize communities to reduce health disparities and healthcare costs. By working with communities and using community engagement approaches, these multi-sector partnerships can foster community ownership and sustainability of health innovations. Dr. Schiavo also provides methods and strategies to bring multidisciplinary stakeholders together in order to develop sustainable, equitable solutions.

Course Objectives:

  1. Define community
  2. Engage in multi-sectoral partnerships and interventions for health equity
  3. Implement strategies within your organization to advance health equity

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A8, 3B8, 38C, 4A1, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4B1, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4C1, 4C3, 4C5

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I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Grow a Healthy Public Food Sector

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support food policy changes in their communities to encourage healthy food systems. The session begins with a discussion of why the public sector should be involved in developing policies around food and how local health agencies can lead the charge. Next, learners will learn about food system goals that can promote health and how to achieve those goals. Finally, learners will explore case studies that demonstrate how public health agencies have planned and implemented changes to their food systems.

Course Objectives:

  1. Explain and define the scope of the public, the private (market) and the non-profit (civil society) sectors in making healthy food more available and affordable.
  2. Identify the various functions that the public sector plays in making healthy food available and affordable including: procurement, institutional food, taxation, enforcing  food safety standards, regulating retail food outlets and restaurants , and providing food benefits(e.g., SNAP,WIC and school food).
  3. Distinguish roles of local, state and federal governments in public sector food and identify food-related responsibilities of various government sectors including health, education, agriculture, environmental protection, economic development, zoning and land use, and consumer protection.
  4. Describe innovative practices, policies and programs of state and local health departments in supporting public sector initiatives to increase access to healthy affordable food and reduce racial/ethnic, socioeconomic and other inequalities in diet-related diseases.
  5. Describe governance mechanisms for engaging citizens, social movements, advocacy groups and others in using the public sector to shape healthier food environments.
  6. Assess the scope and strengths and weaknesses of their own health department’s food portfolio and identify ways their department could use existing resources and mandates to strengthen the public sector’s role in making healthy food more affordable and accessible.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A11, 1B1, 1C1, 2A2, 2A5, 2A6, 2A7, 2B2, 2B6, 2B7, 2B8, 2C2, 2C6, 3A8, 3B8, 3C8, 4A3, 4A4, 4A6, 4B3, 4C3, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5B1, 5B2, 5B3, 5C1, 5C2, 5C3

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Use Countermarketing to Address Tobacco, Alcohol and Unhealthy Food

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support the use of countermarketing strategies to reduce demand for tobacco, alcohol and processed foods high in sugar, salt and unhealthy fats. The session begins with a discussion of countermarketing as a public health strategy for reducing the use of tobacco, alcohol, and unhealthy food. Next, learners will explore the elements of countermarketing campaigns, and look at two health departments that have used them successfully. Finally, learners will apply these strategies to think through a hypothetical countermarketing campaign, and plan how you might use them in your own work.

Course Objectives:

  1. Summarize evidence on the impact of tobacco countermarketing on the initiation of smoking among young adults.
  2. Explain why lessons from evidence-based tobacco counter marketing could be effective for countermarketing alcohol and unhealthy food.
  3. Identify and describe at least five elements of effective tobacco countermarketing campaigns and explain their relevance to countermarketing unhealthy food and alcohol.
  4. Describe at least three roles that state and local health departments can play in countermarketing tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy food (e.g., creating and/or funding public countermarketing campaigns, funding community and youth groups to develop and launch campaigns, training on countermarketing strategies, convening organizations involved in countermarketing).
  5. Describe two specific local or state initiatives designed to support countermarketing of tobacco, alcohol or unhealthy food that have been used in other jurisdictions that could be applied in participant’s own setting.
  6. Explain how LHDs can leverage “upstream” strategies, including partnering with social movements and community organizations and expanding democratic participation, to support the design and implementation of these initiatives.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A7, 1A9, 1B1, 1C1, 2A2, 2A6, 2B2, 2B6, 2B8, 2C2, 3A3, 3A4, 3A5, 3A6, 3B3, 3B4, 3B5, 3B6, 3C5, 4A3, 4A5, 4B3, 5A2

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Protect the Health of Immigrants

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support health care, social services, and public health programs to protect the health of immigrants. This session begins with an introduction to immigration policy and its relationship to health as well as local strategies to protect immigrant health. Next, learns will explore three case studies that highlight real policy changes governments have implemented to create more immigrant inclusive communities. During these case studies, learners will have time to reflect on ways their organization can partner with government agencies to support immigration health.

Course Objectives:

  1. Describe evidence documenting major health challenges facing immigrants in the United States
  2. Explain the pathways by which immigration policy can influence the health of immigrant populations
  3. Identify specific strategies that state and local health agencies can adopt to improve health for immigrant populations
  4. Describe at least three specific local or state initiatives designed to improve the health of immigrant populations that could be adapted to the participant’s community
  5. Explain how LHDs can leverage “upstream” strategies, including partnering with other agencies, social movements and community organizations, to design implement these initiative

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A11, 1A12, 1B1, 1B11, 1B12, 1C1, 1C11, 1C12, 2A2, 2A5, 2A6, 2A7, 2B2, 2B5, 2B6, 2B7, 2C2 , 2C5, 2C6, 3A3, 3A7, 3A8, 3B3, 3B7, 3B8, 3C3, 3C7, 3C8, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4B3, 4B4 , 4B5, 4B6, 4C3, 4C4, 4C5, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5B1, 5B3, 5B9, 5C1, 5C3, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8B2, 8B3, 8B10, 8C2, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Socio-structural factors, health disparities, and the uptake of biomedical HIV prevention for Black Men who have Sex with Men (MSM)

Presenter:mp3243
Morgan Philbin, PhD, MHS
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Description:

Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are at significantly higher risk of HIV. This is due to a complex interplay between socio-structural factors and their own intersectional identities. In this webinar, Dr Philbin describes her ethnographic study examining how factors at all levels of the social-ecological model shape healthcare behavior for black MSM and how they access PreP, as well as her sub-study about structural barriers to access. Some of these barriers included misunderstanding about PreP’s effectiveness and side-effects, concerns that it would decrease others’ condom use, distrust in the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare providers, precarious housing, the structure of the labor market, gendered healthcare systems, institutional and normative gender rules, and stigma. Dr Philbin highlights the importance of reducing barriers at all levels, particularly at the structural level in areas of stigma, employment, and housing. The implications include the need to eliminate the relationship between employment and access to healthcare, enacting policies that regulate shift work (scheduling and pay), creating clinical spaces that welcome all types of men, and expanding the PreP Assistance Program.

Course Objectives:

1) Describe how factors not directly related to biomedical HIV prevention (e.g., the labor market, law enforcement, gendered expectations) influence how Black MSM approach HIV prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis.

2) Give examples of how factors across multiple levels (e.g., structural, community, interpersonal) impact how Black MSM engage with biomedical HIV prevention.

3) Describe what types of multi-level approaches might facilitate Black MSM’s uptake of PrEP. Describe how can we balance the development of more proximate interventions (e.g., education campaigns) with large scale interventions (e.g., expanding insurance access) that might have a larger impact.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

2B8, 3A8, 4A2, 4A3, 4A4, 4A6

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Housing as an Intermediary Determinant of Health and Points of Intervention to Reduce Disparities

Housing is where our economic, social, and personal lives come together. In this webinar, Dr. Angela Aidala and Dr. Robert Fullilove discuss housing as an intermediary social determinant of health and health equity. Fundamental determinants of health are macro-level cultural and economic policies, practices and dynamics that affect the socioeconomic position of individuals, groups and communities. These determinants operate directly on us through more proximal ‘intermediary’ determinants like housing to shape health outcomes. Housing links upstream fundamental determinants of health to the more immediate physical and social environments in which we live our lives.

By participating in this webinar, individuals will be able to:
• Understand the importance of housing and housing systems as intermediary determinants of health.
• Identify opportunities for public health policy and programmatic points of action in housing and housing systems to improve individual and community health.
• Learn from cross-sectoral initiatives involving local and state health departments that have targeted housing and residential environments as strategic points of intervention.

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1B1, 1C1, 2A1, 2A2, 2A7, 2A9,  2B1, 2B2, 2B7, 2B9, 2C1, 2C2, 2C7, 2C9, 4A1, 4A2, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4B1, 4B2, 4B3, 4B4, 4B5, 4B6, 4C1, 4C2, 4C3, 4C4, 4C5,4C6, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5B1, 5B2, 5B3,5C2, 5C3, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8A5, 8B2, 8B3, 8B4, 8B5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Healthcare Review

Presenter:

Carolyn Daniels, D.H.Sc, M.Ed.

Executive Director

Office of Minority and Multicultural Health

New Jersey Department of Health

Date: June 7, 2016

Description: This webinar covers a brief history of the Cultural and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) Standards, the overview and importance of implementing CLAS, CLAS Standards, implementation strategies, the Title VI Civil Rights Act, and the relationship of Title VI to the CLAS Standards. CLAS is increasingly important as the communities we serve experience changes in demographics and increasing diversity, while health disparities and inequalities continue to plague the greater population. This webinar outlines the National CLAS Standards Blueprint, a condensed version of the full CLAS Standards that can be used as an implementation guide, created and released by the New Jersey Office of Minority Multicultural Health in 2014.

By the end of this webinar you should be able to:

  • Explain why CLAS standards are vital for advancing health equity, improving quality, and helping to eliminate healthcare disparities;
  • Consider ways your organization could work with community stakeholders to ensure community needs and assets data is being collected and responded to appropriately;
  • Identify implementation strategies that your organization could use to integrate various CLAS standards into policy and practice;
  • Identify challenges to implementing the CLAS standards at your organization.

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

3A1, 3A3, 3A4, 3A5, 3A8, 4A1, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4A7, 5A1, 5A5, 5A6, 5A9, 8A3, 8A4, 8A6, 2B8, 7B2, 7B3, 7B5


Click on the appropriate button to begin.I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Breast Cancer Screening and other Health Behaviors among Latinas

Presenter: Dr. Ana Abriado-Lanza_AO79392
Associate Professor
Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Description: In this webinar, Dr. Ana Abriado-Lanza gives an overview of the break down of the Latino population living in the United States, linking these statistics to breast cancer screening disparities between Latinas and non-Hispanic whites.  Through description of relevant evidence-based literature and her own research, Dr. Lanza identifies cultural and structural factors that impact screening rates and breast cancer morbidity and mortality.  She concludes by specifying rich areas for future research in addressing Latino health disparities related to cancer screening, smoking, and physical activity.

Date: March 1st, 2016

Recommended Pre-Webinar Reading:

Reflection Questions:

  • Why is it important to consider the heterogeneity of Latino groups in the United States?
  • What are some of challenges inherent in the concept of acculturation?
  • What are the controversies regarding fatalism and cancer screening?

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 2A5, 4A2, 4A5, 5A2, 8A4, 8A5

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Think Cultural Health

Offers the latest resources, including free and accredited continuing education programs, and tools for providers to promote cultural and linguistic competency in health care. Developed by the Office of Minority Health.

This is also an additional resource listed for the New York New Jersey Public Health Training Center learning modules:

https://www.thinkculturalhealth.hhs.gov

CDC Tools for Cross-Cultural Communication and Language Access Can Help Organizations Address Health Literacy and Improve Communication Effectiveness

This site offers tools to support and develop health communication that recognizes and bridges cultural differences.

This is also an additional resource listed for the New York New Jersey Public Health Training Center learning modules:

http://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/culture.html