Strategies to Advance Health Equity: How Health Departments Can Protect the Health of Immigrants

Content Experts:
Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH, MPH
Distinguished Professor
Faculty Director, CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute

Emily Franzosa, DrPH, MA
Senior Researcher, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy

Description:

This self-paced, interactive module prepares public health professionals working in state and local health departments to develop or support health care, social services, and public health programs to protect the health of immigrants. This session begins with an introduction to immigration policy and its relationship to health as well as local strategies to protect immigrant health. Next, learns will explore three case studies that highlight real policy changes governments have implemented to create more immigrant inclusive communities. During these case studies, learners will have time to reflect on ways their organization can partner with government agencies to support immigration health.

Course Objectives:

  1. Describe evidence documenting major health challenges facing immigrants in the United States
  2. Explain the pathways by which immigration policy can influence the health of immigrant populations
  3. Identify specific strategies that state and local health agencies can adopt to improve health for immigrant populations
  4. Describe at least three specific local or state initiatives designed to improve the health of immigrant populations that could be adapted to the participant’s community
  5. Explain how LHDs can leverage “upstream” strategies, including partnering with other agencies, social movements and community organizations, to design implement these initiative

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A11, 1A12, 1B1, 1B11, 1B12, 1C1, 1C11, 1C12, 2A2, 2A5, 2A6, 2A7, 2B2, 2B5, 2B6, 2B7, 2C2 , 2C5, 2C6, 3A3, 3A7, 3A8, 3B3, 3B7, 3B8, 3C3, 3C7, 3C8, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4B3, 4B4 , 4B5, 4B6, 4C3, 4C4, 4C5, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5B1, 5B3, 5B9, 5C1, 5C3, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8B2, 8B3, 8B10, 8C2, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Moviendo la práctica de la salud pública rio arriba para reducir las desigualdades en salud

Presentador: Nicholas Freudenberg, DrPH Profesor Distinguido de Salud Pública
Director de Facultad, Centro de Políticas de Comida de la Ciudad de Nueva York en Hunter College
Ciudad Universitaria de Nueva York Escuela de Salud Pública y Hunter College

Fecha: 1 de septiembre de 2015

Lectura pre-webinar recomendada: Freudenberg, N., Franzosa, E, Chisholm, J., Libman, K. (2015). Nuevo enfoque para moverse rio arriba: cómo los departamentos de salud estatales y locales pueden transformar la práctica para reducir las desigualdades en salud. Educación y comportamiento en salud 42 (IS), 46S-56S

Preguntas para reflexionar:
¿Por qué deberían los profesionales de la salud pública asumir más causas ascendentes de la mala salud con el fin de reducir mejor las desigualdades en salud?
¿Cómo pueden los profesionales de la salud pública en los departamentos de salud estatales y locales moverse rio arriba sin “caer en el río”, es decir, sin poner en riesgo sus puestos de trabajo o las comunidades que sirven?
¿Cómo pueden los profesionales de la salud pública aliarse con los movimientos sociales de hoy para avanzar en los esfuerzos por la equidad en salud?

Council on Linkages Competencias básicas para profesionales de la salud pública (versión 2014)

  • Dominio de Competencia Primaria: Liderazgo y Habilidades de Pensamiento en Sistemas
  • Compentecias especifcias: 1A1, 1A2, 1A7, 1A11, 1A13, 1B1, 1B2, 1B11, 1B13, 1B15, 1C1, 1C2, 1C11, 1C13, 1C15, 2A1, 2A3, 2A5, 2A6, 2A9, 2B3, 2B5, 2C3, 2C5, 2C6, 2C9, 3A1, 3A3, 3A4, 3A7, 3A8, 3B1, 3B3, 3B4, 3B7, 3B8, 3C1, 3C3, 3C4, 3C7, 3C8, 4A1-4A7, 4B1-4B8, 4C1-4C8, 5A1, 5A2, 5A5, 5A7, 5B1, 5B2, 5B5, 5B7, 5C1, 5C2, 5C5, 5C7, 5C11, 6A8, 6A9, 6B8, 6B9, 6C8, 6C9, 7A1, 7A2, 7A10, 7A11, 7B1, 7B2, 7C1, 7C2, 8A1-A4, 8A8, 8B1-B4, 8B8, 8B9, 8B10, 8C1-C4, 8C8, 8C9, 8C10

Tomar este entrenamiento

Responding to an Asthma Episode in the Medical Room

Description:

This module (part of a series) was developed with content experts in the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Office of School Health. This module covers three key factors in each response including assessing if the child is in respiratory distress, if they have a medication administration form on file, and if they have a documented asthma diagnosis.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the appropriate disposition of a student experiencing respiratory symptoms according to history and presentation;
  • Determine course of action whether child is in respiratory distress or not;
  • Administer treatment as per asthma medication administration form (MAF) on file.

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A10, 7A3, 8A3, 8A9

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Assessment of Asthma

Description:

This module (part of a series) was developed with content experts in the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s Office of School Health. This learning module describes the five steps in conducting an effective asthma assessment.

Learning Objectives:

  • Perform an initial visual assessment and differentiate between normal and abnormal presentations;
  • Describe a focused history;
  • Perform respiratory auscultation assessment, describe various breath sounds and distinguish between normal and abnormal breath sounds;
  • Appraise respiratory status and recognize abnormal vital signs;
  • Identify asthma triggers;
  • Distinguish between controlled and not controlled asthma;
  • Determine appropriate clinical disposition.

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A2, 7A3, 8A1, 8A9

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Supportive Housing to Address Social Determinants: Cross-sector Collaborations and Funding Possibilities

Presenter:kristen-miller-photo

Kristin Miller
Director
Corporation for Supportive Housing

Description:

In this webinar, Kristen Miller, Director of Corporation for Supportive Housing, discusses housing as a social determinant of health, describes supportive housing models, and provides examples of how to use data to identify and target individuals in need of supportive housing.

By attending this webinar, participants will:

  • Gain a better understanding of housing as a key social determinant and the impact housing interventions have had in healthcare outcomes and costs
  • Learn about strategies to effectively understand, target and define frequent user population for population health interventions
  • Identify key stakeholders to implement a frequent user initiative including key lessons learned, challenges and best practices

Reflection questions:

  • What is supportive housing is and for whom should it be targeted?
  • How can health departments and public health professionals contribute to local initiatives to address housing needs affecting the health of their most vulnerable residents?
  • What are opportunities to expand resources available to address prevention and health care needs of residents with housing challenges?

Continuing Education: 1.0 CPH, 1.0 CHES

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1A4, 1A5, 1A6, 1A7, A8, 1A9, 1A10, 1A11, 1A12, 1A13, 1A14, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5A5, 5A6, 5A7, 5A8, 5A9, 5A10, 7A1, 7A2, 7A3, 7A4, 7A5, 7A6, 7A7, 7A8, 7A9, 7A10, 7A11, 7A12, 7A13, 7A14, 8A1, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8A5, 8A6, 8A7, 8A8, 8A9

1B1, 1B2, 1B3, 1B4, 1B5, 1B5, 1B6, 1B7, 1B8, 1B9, 1B10, 1B11, 1B12, 1B13, 1B14, 1B1, 55B1, 5B2, 5B3, 5B4, 5B5, 5B6, 5B7, 5B8, 5B9, 5B10, 5B11, 7B1, 7B2, 7B3, 7B4, 7B5, 7B6, 7B7, 7B8, 7B9, 7B10, 7B11, 7B12, 7B13, 7B14, 7B15, 7B16, 8B1, 8B2, 8B3, 8B4, 8B5, 8B6, 8B7, 8B8, 8B9, 8B10

1C1, 1C2, 1C3, 1C4, 1C5, 1C6, 1C7, 1C8, 1C9, 1C10, 1C11, 1C12, 1C13, 1C14, 1C15, 5C1, 5C2, 5C3, 5C4, 5C5, 5C6, 5C7, 5C8, 5C9, 5C10, 5C11, 7C1, 7C2, 7C3, 7C4, 7C5, 7C6, 7C7, 7C8, 7C9, 7C10, 7C11, 7C12, 7C13, 7C14, 7C15, 7C16, 8C1, 8C2, 8C3, 8C4, 8C5, 8C6, 8C7, 8C8, 8C9, 8C10

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Training Program – Advancing Public Health Leadership in Times of Crisis

COURSE DESCRIPTION

What does it mean to be a leader in a time of crisis? What have other leaders done in crisis to achieve positive public health outcomes? How can you identify your community’s needs and build on their strengths? Can the federal government contribute to supporting your projects? Is it possible to develop programs and initiatives that are sustainable? How can effective partnerships lead to better outcomes with fewer resources? What role can you play to secure the essential public health services?

 

Contrary to popular belief, in a time of crisis and uncertainty, there are many tools at the disposal of leaders who want to have a positive impact on the public’s health.

 

ADVANCING PUBLIC HEALTH LEADERSHIP IN TIMES OF CRISIS is a leadership development program for Senior and Middle Level Professionals at the Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDOH).  The purpose of this program is to significantly increase participant’ capacity to sustain the demands of leadership and to strengthen their ability to successfully exercise both leadership and authority.  The program draws on several disciplines including public health practice, leadership development, management, public policy and sociology to provide participants with deep exploration of these topics and a practical experience to enhance their effectiveness.

The program focuses on helping participants:

  • Improve their individual leadership skills.
  • Examine tools for the effective application of the essential public health services.
  • Enhance their ability to establish effective collaborations with diverse stakeholders
  • Apply their skills to institutionalized public health initiatives

 

Help us change the way healthcare is delivered in a constantly morphing healthcare system!

 

CLASS SESSIONS*
June 15, 2016 –             5:00 – 9:00PM

June 29, 2016 –           5:00 – 9:00PM

August 10, 2016 –       5:00 – 9:00PM

August 24, 2016 –       5:00 – 9:00PM

* Participation at all sessions is mandatory to receive certification.

 

INSTRUCTORS/PRINCIPAL RESEARCHERS

 

 murrman

Dr. Marita Murrman, EdD, MS

212-305-0096, mkm27@columbia.edu, Columbia University

 

 

 

capriles-quirosDr. Jose Capriles, BS, MD, MPH, MHSA

787-758-2525, jose.capriles@upr.edu, Medical Sciences Campus Puerto Rico

 

 

 

 

mariaMs. Maria Levis, MPH, MPA

787-993-1508, maria.levis@gmail.com, Impactivo.

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT US

The Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health has partnered with Rutgers School of Public Health, the University of Puerto Rico Graduate School of Public Health, the New York State Association of County Health Officials and the University of the Virgin Islands, and Lifelong Learning Center to develop the HRSA-funded Region 2 Public Health Training Center (PHTC).  The PHTC’s mission is to enhance the public health workforces’ ability to effectively deliver the Essential Public Health Services to the populations in its Region.  The PHTC is partnering with Impactivo, LLC to provide advanced leadership training for Senior Level Professionals at the Puerto Rico Department of Health.

impactivo

cropped-logo-final-color-horizontal-default.png

cumsph

rusph

upr uvicell

nysacho    

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR

ADVANCING PUBLIC HEALTH LEADERSHIP IN TIMES OF CRISIS is a program for Senior and Middle Level Professionals working with the Puerto Rico Department of Health who are interested in exercising leadership in Public Health.

 

APPLICATION PROCESS

All applicants MUST submit an online application by May 16, 2016.  The online application can be found at:  http://tinyurl.com/PRLeadershipApplication

Selected participants will be notified by May 25, 2016.

 

ADDITIONAL PARTICIPANT BENEFITS

  • Enhanced skills and knowledge to exercise public health leadership
  • Opportunity to meet top level health industry leaders
  • Certification from a HRSA-funded Regional Public Health Training Center, a collaboration of 3 CEPH-accredited schools of public health (Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and University of Puerto Rico Graduate School of Public Health, Rutgers University School of Public Health).
  • One year of access to Region 2 state-of the-art online training modules and other learning materials.
  • Materials that are included in the course, such as pens, folders, and mugs.
  • Peer learning and support
  • Continuing education credits

 

FUNDING STATEMENT

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP27878-01-00, Affordable Care Act (ACA) Public Health Training Centers. This information or content and conclusions are those of the authors and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

All participants are expected to arrive on time and attend all live sessions.  It is expected that participants will come to each session ready with their work completed and prepared to discuss required reading.

 

 

PROGRAM STRUCTURE

ADVANCING PUBLIC HEALTH LEADERSHIP IN TIMES OF CRISIS provides leadership training via an experiential learning process that includes four live sessions and access to online webinars.  Live sessions will include a variety of learning structures including a combination of lectures, seminars, individual and group work.

 

LANGUAGE SUPPORT

In order to provide for the best learning experience for all participants, accommodations are available for students whose primary language is Spanish and are interested in receiving additional support.  The course is designed so that students can take advantage of the opportunity even if they do not speak English.

 

 

PROGRAM SCHEDULE

 

Session 1 – What does it mean to be a leader in a time of crisis?
June 15

 

Topics

  • Your Personal Brand
  • The role of public health in society, the effects of the PR crisis on their public health practice and the meaning of exercising leadership in public health.

 

Guest Panel

–          Past PR Secretaries of Health will respond to questions about their experience as Public Health Officials and lessons learned.

 

Networking Session

 

Session 2 – Leading your community
June 29

 

Topics

  • Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Personal Assessment and Profiles
  • The difference between leadership and authority, technical versus adaptive challenges, and how these relate to their experiences.
  • How to structure a Community Health Needs Assessment Process

 

Guest Panel Discussion

–          Community Groups Working in Public Health will answer questions about their roles, collaboration and the types of relationships with the PR Department of Health which would make their efforts more successful.

 

Networking Session

 

Session 3 – Leading with the power of the law
August 10

 

Topics

  • Strategic planning
  • Federal and local legal and regulatory structures for public health policy and program development

 

Guest Panel Discussion

–          Experts in Health Policy will answer questions about the work they have carried out in developing health policies across various scenarios and relationships with federal agencies.

 

Networking Session

Session 4 – Leading with others
August 24

 

Topics

  • Analysis of your professional network
  • Opportunities and structure for effective collaborations
  •  Roles and responsibilities of governmental and non-governmental organizations

 

Guest Panel Discussion

–          Private Sector Leaders will answer questions about their roles, collaboration and the types of relationships with the PR Department of Health which would make their efforts more successful.

 

Networking Session

 

Succession Planning for Local Health Departments: What it is and What should we do? (Part 1 of 3)

Succession planning in local health departments (LDHs) is the proactive attempt to ensure that leadership in LHDs will be continuous by identifying how these positions will be filled as both planned and unplanned departures occur. For many reasons, succession planning does not commonly take place in the LHD setting. In this first in a series of three introductory level webinars, Dr. Schmalzried addressed the following learning objectives: to understand the concept of succession planning; to appreciate the importance of creating a succession plan; to learn about motivating factors and key principles behind succession planning; and to understand why LHDs have not developed succession plans.

Dr. Schmalzried is a Professor of Public Health and Chair of the Department of Public and Allied Health at Bowling Green State University (BGSU). Prior to coming to BGSU as a fulltime faculty member in 2005, Dr. Schmalzried served for 18 years as Health Commissioner for two county health districts – Fulton County and Henry County, Ohio. While there, he led a staff of over 85 providing both traditional public health services and innovative programs including Home Health, Hospice, a regional dental center, and a mobile migrant medical services project. Prior to being a health commissioner, Dr. Schmalzried spent seven years with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, first as an Environmental Scientist and then as a Certified Environmental Engineer.

Speaker: Hans Schmalzried, PhD, Professor of Public Health and Chair of the Department of Public and Allied Health at Bowling Green State University
Date: Wednesday, November 20, 2013
Time: 1:00-2:00pm

 

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I DO NOT WORK FOR A STATE OR LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN NYS.


I DO WORK FOR A STATE OR A LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Succession Planning for Local Health Departments: An example of how to do it (Part 3 of 3)

Succession planning in local health departments (LHDs) is the proactive attempt to ensure that leadership in LHDs will be continuous by identifying how these positions will be filled as both planned and unplanned departures occur. For many reasons, succession planning does not commonly take place in the LHD setting. In this third presentation of a series of three introductory level webinars, Dr. Schmalzried addressed the following learning objectives: to learn from an example of succession planning for LHD management level positions and to learn from an example of developing a succession plan for a health department director/health commissioner.

Dr. Schmalzried is a Professor of Public Health and Chair of the Department of Public and Allied Health at Bowling Green State University (BGSU). Prior to coming to BGSU as a fulltime faculty member in 2005, Dr. Schmalzried served for 18 years as Health Commissioner for two county health districts – Fulton County and Henry County, Ohio. While there, he led a staff of over 85 providing both traditional public health services and innovative programs including Home Health, Hospice, a regional dental center, and a mobile migrant medical services project. Prior to being a health commissioner, Dr. Schmalzried spent seven years with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, first as an Environmental Scientist and then as a Certified Environmental Engineer.

Speaker: Hans Schmalzried, PhD, Professor of Public Health and Chair of the Department of Public and Allied Health at Bowling Green State University
Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Time: 1:00-2:00pm

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I DO NOT WORK FOR A STATE OR LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN NYS.


I DO WORK FOR A STATE OR A LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

Succession Planning for Local Health Departments: How do we do it? (Part 2 of 3)

Succession planning in local health departments (LDHs) is the proactive attempt to ensure that leadership in LHDs will be continuous by identifying how these positions will be filled as both planned and unplanned departures occur. For many reasons, succession planning does not commonly take place in the LHD setting. In this second presentation of a series of three introductory level webinars, Dr. Schmalzried addressed the following learning objectives: Learn how the scope of succession planning can be determined for a local health department; Understand how gap analysis can be conducted in a local health department; Learn about various tools used for succession planning and workforce development; Know about the essential components needed to design a succession plan for a local health department; and Discuss succession planning strategies that could help overcome civil service and collective bargaining challenges at local health departments.

Dr. Schmalzried is a Professor of Public Health and Chair of the Department of Public and Allied Health at Bowling Green State University (BGSU). Prior to coming to BGSU as a fulltime faculty member in 2005, Dr. Schmalzried served for 18 years as Health Commissioner for two county health districts – Fulton County and Henry County, Ohio. While there, he led a staff of over 85 providing both traditional public health services and innovative programs including Home Health, Hospice, a regional dental center, and a mobile migrant medical services project. Prior to being a health commissioner, Dr. Schmalzried spent seven years with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, first as an Environmental Scientist and then as a Certified Environmental Engineer.

Speaker: Hans Schmalzried, PhD, Professor of Public Health and Chair of the Department of Public and Allied Health at Bowling Green State University
Date: Wednesday, December 11, 2013
Time: 1:00-2:00pm

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I DO NOT WORK FOR A STATE OR LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN NYS.


I DO WORK FOR A STATE OR A LOCAL HEALTH DEPARTMENT IN NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).

“School to Prison” to “School Again”: Preparing a New Workforce to Address Health Disparities

Presenter: Robert Fullilove, EdDRobert Fullilove

Professor of Sociomedical Sciences

Associate Dean, Community and Minority Affairs

Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

Date: January 5th, 2016

Description:

Mass incarceration is one of the leading contributors of health disparities, with a disproportionately large percentage of African American and Latino men experiencing incarceration during their lifetime.  Having ever served time makes finding a job, securing housing, and utilizing health care services significantly more difficult, if not impossible.  While the United States prison system is meant to “rehabilitate” inmates, many who are released have no education, no job, and no home, and are forced to resort to criminal activities, leading to high recidivism rates.  This webinar raises the importance of educational programs for inmates as an effective tool for improving outcomes after release and reducing recidivism. Dr. Fullilove discusses his experience with the Bard Prison Initiative and his vision for a public health prison education system that would educate and recruit inmates as community public health workers striving to improve health and reduce disparities within their own neighborhoods after their release.

 

Recommended Pre-Webinar Reading:

Reflection Questions:

  • Pell grants are about to be available for students taking college courses in prison. What is needed to develop a public health concentration for any new program that focuses on the education and training of inmates?
  • In what way can current ‘pipeline’ programs to increase the participation of underrepresented minority students be adjusted to create a pipeline for students in prison?
  • How might evaluation studies assist in the creation of programs designed to alter the tragic school-to-prison pipeline that engages all too many students of color in the US?

Council on Linkages Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals (2014 Version)

1A1, 1A11, 1B1, 1B11, 2A2, 2A5, 2A6, 2A7, 2B8, 3A3, 3A8, 3B3, 3B8, 4A3, 4A4, 4A5, 4A6, 4A7, 4B3, 4B4, 5A1, 5A2, 5A3, 5A4, 5A5, 5A7, 5B3, 6A9, 7A2, 7A6, 8A2, 8A3, 8A4, 8A6, 8B2, 8B3, 8B6

Click on the appropriate button to begin.

I do not work for a State or Local Health Department in NYS.


I do work for a State or a Local Health Department in NYS.

If you are employed by NYS or a local health department in NYS, we recommend that you register for this course through the NYS Department of Health Learning Management System (DOH LMS).