Tag: communication

Navigating the path to a culture of healing: How trauma-informed care provides a blueprint for the well-being of public health professionals and the communities they serve
Navigating the path to a culture of healing: How trauma-informed care provides a blueprint for the well-being of public health professionals and the communities they serve. Carina Schmid, RN, MPH Lecturer, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Trauma-Informed Coach Resonant healing practitioner Livestreaming: October 3rd, 2023, 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Understand the increasing and universal need for trauma-informed care and communication
  • Identify the linkage between trauma and adverse health outcomes
  • Articulate the underlying principles of trauma-informed care

Date: October 3, 2023

Presenter:
Carina Schmid, MPH
Lecturer, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health
Trauma-informed coach and resonant healing practitioner


Ms. Schmid discusses how trauma-informed care provides a basis for public health professionals and the communities they serve. Trauma-informed care and communication have become increasingly crucial for public health professionals, driven by the substantial impact and prevalence of trauma within individuals, communities, and populations — including the professionals themselves. This webinar serves as an introduction to the realm of trauma-informed care, encompassing essential concepts, the intricate connection between trauma and adverse health outcomes, and the guiding principles of trauma-informed practice. Together, we get a taste of the journey that shifts our perspective from asking, “What is wrong with you?” (or me, or them) to understanding, “What happened to you?” (or me, or us).

Recruitment and Retention in Public Health

Course Objectives

  • List the six steps in the recruitment process
  • List tools you can use to prioritize the positions you need to fill
  • Describe how diversity, equity, and inclusion are part of each step of the recruitment and retention process
  • Explain the importance of a well-written job description, and how a description is different from a job posting or job advertisement
  • Describe the basics of recruitment marketing and employer branding
  • Identify at least three potential partners for developing recruitment partnerships
  • Explain how to improve communications with job candidates
  • List key elements of onboarding and retention

Date: July 1, 2023


In this self-paced module course, Dr. Heather Krasna, Associate Dean, Career Services and Professional Development at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, provides a crash course on recruitment and retention of new hires, from start to finish.

Confronting Barriers to Vaccine Acceptance: Create Effective Communication Using Behavioral Science

Course Objective

  • Describe vaccine hesitancy/vaccine confidence and why it is an important public health issue
  • Define behavioral science
  • Apply the Health Belief Model (HBM) to design vaccine messaging
  • Describe approaches to using behavioral science to combat misinformation about vaccines and build trust and confidence in vaccines and health care providers
  • Explain how these principles apply to current public health challenges that are described in case studies, including flu, COVID, and childhood vaccines

Date: June 30, 2023


This self-paced module course outlines how to confront barriers to vaccine acceptance by creating effective communication using behavioral science, health literacy, and techniques to combat misinformation. It provides an introduction to the key tools from each of those fields, then instructs on the five-step process of developing vaccine communications. It includes case studies to show how these principles have been applied in a real-world setting. This course is appropriate for anyone communicating about vaccination, from healthcare workers in one-on-one communications to public health promotion specialists developing full communication campaigns.

Communicate More Effectively: Psychological Principles to Change Behavior and Improve Outcomes

Course Objective

  • Describe what behavioral economics is, with examples of behavioral economics in action
  • Understand how to create messaging for disseminating public health data and information using behavioral economics principles
  • List and explain some key biases related to communicating information to influence behavior and improve health
  • Discuss some ethical considerations around the use of behavioral economics in communication

Date: June 30th, 2022

Presenter:
Suzanne Kirkendall, MPH
CEO, BVA Nudge Consulting North America


This course empowers public health professionals to communicate more effectively with the public. To do so, learners will discover the basics of behavioral economics, key psychological principles that are important in communications, and the five-step process for how to apply these principles to their communications ethically and effectively. This is illustrated with a case study on how these new skills could be applied to a real-life situation.

Learners will be able to:

  1. Describe what behavioral economics is, with examples of behavioral economics in action
  2. Understand how to create messaging for disseminating public health data and information using behavioral economics principles
  3. List and explain some key biases related to communicating information to influence behavior and improve health
  4. Discuss some ethical considerations around the use of behavioral economics in communication
Strategic Storytelling: Using Data to Tell a Story and Telling Stories with Data
Strategic Storytelling: Using Data to Tell a Story and Telling Stories with Data Mark Dessauer, MA Vice President of Learning Spitfire Strategies Livestreaming February 2nd 2021 12-1pm ET

Course Objective

  • Describe how to find a story within a set of data points and how to use data effectively within a story. 
  • Summarize different ways to use data both ethically and effectively in a story.
  • Explain how to tell stories of structure change.
  • List Edward Tufte’s six guidelines for the visual display of information.

Date: February  2, 2021

Presenter:
Mark Dessauer, MA
Vice President of Learning
Spitfire Strategies


In the final webinar of our Strategic Storytelling series, Mark Dessauer, MA, shows us how public health practitioners can use data points to build a story and demonstrate impact. He walks us through the steps of finding a story in data and provides clear guidelines to ensure that the story we choose is engaging. He introduces the seven different types of data stories, while highlighting their strengths and weaknesses along the way. Mark emphasizes the most important dos and don’ts of using data in stories and shares vital infographic tips. After reviewing several examples of data stories, he explores how to tell stories about structural change and provides an overview of Tufte’s guidelines of the visual display of information. Finally, he shares a number of valuable resources to help enhance the use of data in creating effective stories.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how to find a story within a set of data points and how to use data effectively within a story. 
  2. Summarize different ways to use data both ethically and effectively in a story.
  3. Explain how to tell stories of structure change.
  4. List Edward Tufte’s six guidelines for the visual display of information.
Strategic Storytelling for Public Health
Strategic Storytelling for Public Health Mark Dessauer, MA Vice President of Learning Spitfire Strategies Livestreaming October 6th 2020 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Describe the value and power of using stories to engage audiences in a strategic manner
  • Identify six different types of stories to use when engaging audiences
  • Explain techniques for creating powerful stories, including both the process of telling stories and the content

Date: October 6th 2020

Presenter:
Mark Dessauer, MA
Vice President of Learning
Spitfire Strategies


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, Mark Dessauer, MA, discusses the power of storytelling and how to optimize it. He emphasizes the importance of using stories as a public health tool to engage diverse audiences. He talks about the impact stories can have on changing existing narratives and addressing cultural norms. During this time of uncertainty, Mark stresses the need to use stories to connect people by sharing emotions and experiences that reflect their communities. He reiterates the use of this strategy to shed light on untold stories and to encourage equitable visibility. He also makes use of a variety of examples to demonstrate the effective use of this strategy to influence changes in attitudes and behaviors. Lastly, Mark walks us through the “storyteller’s toolbox”, providing insights on the types of stories to share, what angles to take and how to best showcase them.

Participants will learn how to the following:

  1. Describe the value and power of using stories to engage audiences in a strategic manner
  2. Identify six different types of stories to use when engaging audiences
  3. Explain techniques for creating powerful stories, including both the process of telling stories and the content
COVID19: Using a Health Equity and Human Rights Lens to Protect Vulnerable Populations during this Pandemic and Beyond
COVID19: Using a Health Equity and Human Rights Lens to Protect Vulnerable Populations during this Pandemic and Beyond Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL Senior Lecturer, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health Department of Sociomedical Sciences Founder and President, Board of Directors, Health Equity Initiative Live on Zoom April 7th, 2020 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Discuss why COVID-19 is a health equity issue
  • Identify key principles of the health equity and human rights frameworks to protect vulnerable and marginalized populations during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond
  • Describe the role of community engagement and advocacy during this pandemic and beyond
  • List sample strategies for transformative and long-lasting change

Date: April 7th, 2020

Presenter:
Renata Schiavo, PhD, MA, CCL
Senior Lecturer, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Department of Sociomedical Sciences
Founder and President, Board of Directors, Health Equity Initiative


In this month’s Log-in2Learn Webinar Dr. Renata Schiavo discusses the challenges faced during COVID-19 through a health equity lens. Pandemics are complex circumstances that thrive on inequalities and weak health and social systems. Vulnerable populations are not able to adequately adhere to safety measures and bear the burden of pandemic impacts. The webinar explores how a Social Determinants of Health approach should be implemented to address inequalities during a pandemic.The course also highlights risk communication, community engagement and advocacy as key strategies to support this agenda.

Participants will will be able to:

      1. Discuss why COVID-19 is a health equity issue
      2. Identify key principles of the health equity and human rights frameworks to protect vulnerable and marginalized populations during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond
      3. Describe the role of community engagement and advocacy during this pandemic and beyond
      4. List sample strategies for transformative and long-lasting change
Plain Language: What is it? Why does it matter to health? How can you use it to advance health equity?
Plain Language: What is it? Why does it matter to health? How can you use it to advance health equity? Gretchen Van Wye, PhD, MA Assistant Commissioner & Registrar Bureau of Vital Statistics NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Livestreaming January 7th, 2020 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Identify language that makes comprehension difficult for readers
  • Apply basic strategies to make communication more clear
  • Connect to additional resources to advance their understanding of plain language

Date: January 7th 2020

Presenter:
Gretchen Van Wye, PhD, MA
Assistant Commissioner and Registrar, Bureau of Vital Statistics, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


In this month’s Log-in2Learn, participants will learn the basics of plain language from Dr. Gretchen Van Wye, Assistant Commissioner and Registrar for the Bureau of Vital Statistics for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Gretchen walks participants through basic strategies of clear communication and discusses how plain language is essential to advance health equity.

Participants will learn about the following three lessons about public health communication:

  1. Identify language that makes comprehension difficult for readers
  2. Apply basic strategies to make communication more clear
  3. Connect to additional resources to advance their understanding of plain language
Writing for the Public : The Building BRIDGES Approach
Writing for the Public: The Building BRIDGES Approach Anne Marie Liebel, EdD President Health Communication Partners LLC Livestreaming December 3rd, 2019 12-1 pm ET

Course Objective

  • Describe the rhetorical triangle and its components, and how it can be used to analyze communication
  • Identify assumptions you have about your audience and how these influence your writing
  • Construct an empathy map to help focus your writing

Date: December 3rd, 2019

Presenter:
Anne Marie Liebel, EdD
President
Health Communication Partners LLC.


Public health professionals often construct or contribute to written materials about health topics, which are intended for a broad audience. This webinar explains concrete strategies for writing to the public, based in the building BRIDGES approach.

Drawing from both classical rhetoric and the New Literacy Studies, this webinar teaches ways to communicate effectively with the public. Using real-world examples, you’ll learn skills to break down various forms of communication, from pamphlets to websites. You’ll have a chance to explore your own assumptions about your audiences and see how empathy can enhance your writing. You’ll also learn a strategic way to maintain health literacy principles while getting your point across in oral, digital, and multimodal communications.

Participants will learn how to:

  1. Describe the rhetorical triangle and its components, and how it can be used to analyze communication
  2. Identify assumptions you have about your audience and how these influence your writing
  3. Construct an empathy map to help focus your writing
Strategic Skills Training Series: Introduction to Persuasive Communication

Course Objective

By the end of this module, you should know how to:

  • Identify the key theories of persuasion
  • Identify instances where key theories of persuasion can be applied in a public health context
  • Conduct an audience analysis assessment for a persuasive presentation in a public health setting
  • Describe how to assess elements of key theories of persuasion to create a persuasive argument

…and see how you can incorporate these concepts in your practice to address a major public health crisis.

The Strategic Skills Training Series developed by the Region 2 PHTC aims to help prepare public health leaders and the public health workforce to develop the practices and competencies associated with being a Chief Health Strategist. The modules in this series use the community health improvement planning process to introduce you to the basics of the following four strategic skills areas. The first set of modules have been developed at an introductory level; the next part of the series will build on these foundational modules.

To help you think about ways to leverage these skills in your journey as a Chief Health Strategist to address real world problems in your community, the modules will utilize a case study approach, set in the fictitious Tycho County.

Follow how the Tycho County Health Department could adopt a systems approach to inform its thinking and planning while developing a community health improvement plan focused on a familiar public health problem, opioid misuse.

In this module, you will learn some strategy-based communication principles you can use across different settings and audiences.

Region 2 Public Health Training Center